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1

Deep Navy Blues are known to be difficult to achieve in CMYK. Things tent to get purple rather than deep blue. Cyan ink is just not strong enough to achieve it.


1

Use a Pantones chart as first reference; often the CMYK corresponding recipe is written on them for the process chart. It's never going to be the exact same match but these are the recipes that Pantones itself recommends. Maybe you can even get these equivalent online. All you'll need to do is check what is the recommended CMYK recipe for the Pantones 662 ...


1

You may not get an exact match, but you can get close assuming is from the solid coated book. Here is work around I've used before. In InDesign, create a new swatch, select your PMS number from the appropriate book, then switch back to CMYK in the drop down. That will give you an approximation. Print a test and manually adjust the values until you get as ...


3

The technical solution would be: Get a color profile of your printer. You can make it using special hardware. There is a chance the manufacturer provides one too. Or make a color chart as DA01 recomended. I would make a more methodical one than a random one like the one you posted. I would make a CM K chart. Cyan on X axis, Magenta on Y axis and ...


3

There's a few factors you need to deal with here: Not all Pantone colors are reproducable via CMYK. (in fact, that's one of the reasons people use Pantone colors...to print in colors they normally can't with CMYK) The Dye Sublimation may print CMYK colors differently than what you might see on a offset press. The solution is likely going to be you ...


1

You can get rid of this popup by always using the same exact name for your swatches that have the same color recipe UNLESS you're using a different color or a modified Pantones. It's a good practice to keep your swatch names well identified anyway if you do a print job and also for future reference. If you use Pantones as spot colors, try to always select ...


2

You don't really "get rid" of that message. You decide what you want to do. It is not an error message, it's a workflow message asking you how you want to handle the issue... a decision must be made and Illustrator will not make it for you (thankfully). The conflict means you have 2 swatches with identical names -- one in the document already and one ...


1

Open the photo then go to Image After clicking Image choose Adjust color After that Adjust Hue/Saturation In the corner of the pop up click the colorize box Then change the hue and adjust saturation and lighting to get the blue effect that you want.


0

The letter at the end of the pantone number U and C are just artificial rendering of the metallic ink on coated and uncoated paper for your display. Your printer will use the same can of pantone 877 ink no matter the 877U or 877C you chose for your design! So if you want to know and see how the final result will look like once printed, you should look at ...


0

Yes it's normal. At version CS6 of the Adobe application the Pantone+ libraries were included. Pantone+ Libraries only have LAB definitions. Prior to CS6 and Pantone+ the Pantone Libraries had both CMYK and LAB definitions. You can still use old Pantone libraries in newer versions of Adobe software if you'd prefer. You can review the Adobe documents ...


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It is normal. CC has been using LAB to define PANTONE swatches for the last few versions.


2

The difference in the formula guides is how that color will appear when that ink is applied to a coated or uncoated stock. In general terms, ink on uncoated stock looks a bit less saturated than on coated stock. But be aware the Pantone Formula Guides are references stock (paper) not other substrates such as metal or plastic. Pantone Formula Guides may be ...



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