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7

That's not something you can do with regular paragraphs of arbitrary length, but it's easily done using a two-column table. Set up the table so that the text offset top and bottom is exactly half your normal paragraph spacing. The right column will contain your text. The left column will the Paragraph Style for your guillemet, with the cell style set to ...


7

First set Left Indent to where you'd like the text to start from and then set First Line Indent minus that amount.


6

I think the best way of doing so is coloring the text box, set the paddings and then create an object style. In the object style you can configure the default paragraph style to use.


6

They covered this in my last User's Group meeting. First, you have to set up your paragraph style's Next Style. If you want the paras to go Style A -> B -> A -> B etc, you have to have paragraph A's next style be Paragraph B, and Paragraph B's next style must be style A. Your styles must create a loop. You can do this with any number of styles. Select ALL ...


5

I found it shortly after I posted the question. Here's the GREP ^(Community.+?\r|CN:.+?\r)


4

This is done using GREP Styles, a feature of Paragraph Styles (CS4+). You can assign a Character Style to a specific word or abstractly described string of characters. ('GREP' is originally a UNIX command for programmers to search large source code files for specific code patterns.) Use the online help for details.


4

Alright here we go: Check the export Tags Panel Then go ahead and Export HTML, then open the idGeneratedStyles.css file in your preferred editor: For the second part of your question one possible solution would be to make a Master Stylesheet using XML and import it into the different parts of your book. Though if you did the Master Stylesheet ...


4

It seems counter-intuitive, but you are not trying to format the text itself. The formatting needs to be applied to the text box that the pull quote is in, so the solution is to use Object Styles rather than paragraph styles. Access the dialogue box via Window > Styles > Object Styles. As you would with Paragraph or Character styles create a new style and ...


4

Your plain text style may be based on your heading style. As long as the derived style has exactly the same setting as its parent, changes in the parent are applied to the derived style as well.


3

Yes. Simply set up and configure Paragraph or Character Styles (or table, cell, etc) with no document open. The new styles will then be available in any new document. But they won't be added to any existing documents. You could also configure a template file - .indt - which contains your styles, then start each new document by opening that template. ...


3

Todays Adobe CC Update (2015) brought the solution to this problem. You can now enable paragraph shading to add a background to paragraph styles.


3

The column part is in the Rules section, not in the Underline Section. I'm not sure the Underline option will achieve what you are looking for if the paragraphs you are styling are going to have different line counts/heights. It would however work really well if you are going to use it for headers with one or two lines. You can just set up specific ...


3

If you choose No Style for the Based On field all references to other styles get removed. However all formatting will be retained. Based upon your question, I believe you can set the Based On to No Style and be set. This way all the original "Word (Entry)" style formatting will still be applied to "Main". However, if you change the "Word (Entry)" style, ...


3

Assuming that the numbers are a part of the text and can be styled as a paragraph you can set up a paragraph style that uses Rules as faux backgrounds. Create a new paragraph style and set Character Color → [Paper]. Set a Rule Above with a weight as high as you want the background and a negative Offset so that it is vertically centered on your number. Make ...


2

As of InDesign CC2015 a new feature was released called Paragraph Shading to address this very topic. For basic usage you can click the Shading button on your Paragraph Formatting area: You can also have some control over this through Paragraph Styles:


2

I can't say why for sure, smells like a bug, but there is a way to stop it. Just tested it out (CS6) and it does seem to always add a left-align override to paragraph styles in new columns. But, if you give your table cells a cell style that is set to use your centre-aligned paragraph style, then in new columns with that cell style, the paragraph style's ...


2

A DA01 posts, there is no "standard". It really comes down to what visually separates the paragraphs enough to allow easy flow without creating a "hiccup" in the motion of reading. You do not want the reader to have to stop, find the next paragraph, and continue reading. Even if that takes a millisecond, it can get distracting and unconsciously make the ...


2

is it recommendable to use both indentation and paragraph space It's redundant. So most graphic designers would say it's not recommended--pretty much because there's no need. As for how much space to put between the paragraphs, there is no right answer to this other than put enough space but not too much.


2

Why is leading always set to 120% in applications? Some value needs to be used and the most common denominator is probably the best option from an app development standpoint. It's generally understood that defaults are defaults and should/will be changed. If you're dealing with HTML, that's what CSS reset libraries are for - to remove defaults forcing you ...


2

There's nothing built into InDesign that will automatically insert a newline (or extra space before or space after) only to the first and last paragraphs of a given style. If this is something you will be doing a lot, it could certainly be done with a script that was either set up to start with InDesign or invoked manually. The best place to ask about ...


2

Numbering seems to be less intuitive then thought. There is a lengthy discussion on creating numbered captions here, but to cut a long story short: If you place multiple frames on one page and apply the same numbering style, InDesign will count not be placement but order of creation. That is the reason why I get this weird order on the picture above. If ...


2

You could create outlines of the Guillemet, converting it to art rather than type, then use bulleted lists with an anchored art object. And anchor it to the first line of the text. This will allow the guillemet to travel with its anchored text. However, you'd have to take care with the initial placement.


2

First create a Window > Styles > Character Style that defines how you want the drop caps to look. Name it whatever you want. Then create a Window > Styles > Paragraph Style. In the Drop Caps and Nested Styles section, click New Nested Style, and then set the style pull down to the Character Style you created earlier, and (should be the default) ...


2

The closest I think you could get is with cell styling, but it does have its problems. If you wanted to try it though, it is simple enough to put in place, simply Table > Insert Table a 1x1 table in your text frame. Put whatever paragraph you want to have a fill/stroke inside that cell, then open your Window > Styles > Cell Styles panel, and create ...


2

You have to highlight the text and adjust the stroke properties of the text itself and not of the text frame. Say I have a text frame with several paragraphs, as shown below: You can highlight the paragraph that you want stroked (giggity) and then adjust its stroke the same way you would anything else: You can do this for any selection of text; ...


2

Well, you can import external objects into InDesign in a easy way. If I remember correctly, you can do it with the shortcut Ctrl+D (Cmd + D on Mac). When you do that, there is a window with options for the Import features where you can customize the way you do it. There are options for tables, where you can keep the original format, or use plain text, or ...


2

This varies enormously depending on the document and the workflow. Brochure, where each page is a thought independent of the next page: break up each headline and text box so they aren't linked to anything else. Brochure, where each spread is a thought: headline gets a box, all the text boxes on that spread are linked, but don't link it to the next spread. ...


2

This would be easy, first you have to apply bullets to the paragraphs you have, you can achieve this from multiple places, for now you can go to the Main Menu and then under Type you can find Bullets and Numbering from there chose Apply Bullets. This will give you the desire effects using predefined numbers, you can then change those numbers under the ...


2

There's an option to link an element to specific text. Anchored objects are items, such as images or text boxes, that are attached—or anchored—to specific text. The anchored object travels with the text containing the anchor as the text reflows. Use anchored objects for all objects that you want associated with a particular line or block of text, ...


2

I’ve found there is a way using para and character styles though this means creating as many as there are lines you want indented. I typed in a guillemot (at the start of a two-line paragraph followed by an indent to here character. I then used a negative base-line shift to centre the guillemot on the two lines. I made this into a character style calling it ...



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