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6

I made this in about 3 minutes using the circle tool, direct selection tool and live paint. I don't know if there's a faster way, but this was pretty quick. Basically, draw a circle and a smaller circle inside that circle. Draw a new circle that is the exact width between the left anchor point of the inner circle and the right anchor point of the outer ...


6

Select both circles and click the Divide button on the Pathfinder Panel. This will create 3 separate shapes. You can also simply grab the Live Paint Bucket Tool and click once on the circles to create a Live Paint Group, then continue clicking areas to fill them with color. When done click the Expand button on the control bar across the top of the ...


5

You can simply draw a line and use Effect > Distort & Transform > Roughen to create a jagged line. Then copy the line, select both the "rough" lines and choose Object > Expand Appearance. Then select the end points and join them via Object > Path > Join. It's important to draw a separate line and apply the effect to just a line if you ...


4

When exploring things like this it is best to use very rudimentary objects so you can see the differences. I started with the red circle and black rectangle. I then added a green/yellow stroke after the pathfinder operation so you can see edges better. As you'll notice each operation results in different artwork. The only two which are similar are Trim ...


4

Quick and easy: Put your figure in the back. Set your text in the front. Turn your text into outlines. Select both. Pathfinder→Divide. This breaks the text into pieces using the back figure as the slice point. Use the white arrow to select the pieces of the text which overlay the figure. Color at will.


4

One quick and easy way to do this is with a Clipping Mask: I've got two text layers, one for green and one for purple. I duplicated the silhouette path and used it as a Clipping Mask for the purple text Another way is to use Blending Modes: The top silhouette is filled with blue and the Blending Mode is set to Overlay. Under that is a duplicate of ...


3

This doesn't answer your question specifically (no "cutting" involved), but another less-permanent way to do this is with a clipping mask. Duplicate the circle and make sure it is above the art you want to remove. Then, select both the circle and the art, and do Object → Clipping Mask → Make. This will just "hide" the portion that you don't want to appear ...


2

The Pathfinder Toolset is very good for some tasks, but it's not the only boolean operator in Illustrator. The Shape Builder Tool (Shift+M by default) is what I would recommend in this case. If you hold down Shift, you can delete the sections of lines that are between intersections of selected Items.


1

Assuming the yellow needs to be removed from the mountain. Select the yellow and choose Object > Expand from the menu. This converts the strokes to shapes. Pathfinder doesn't work well with strokes, it needs shapes. Once the strokes are expanded you should be able to use Pathfinder to subtract the yellow shapes from the mountain (or anything else).


1

I post an answer instead of comment because I use pictures. If I had the picture as you and needed to create the picture you need I'd do the follows: Select the upper shape and click Object->Path->Divide Objects Below I've got this picture - After I join the two selected triangles in pathfinder by pressing Join button and this is the final image ...


1

If I understand correctly..... Do this on a copy of the file in case I don't understand correctly. Select all (Select > Select All) Convert Type to Outlines (Type > Convert to Outline) Select All (Select > Select All) Expand strokes (Object > Expand appearance [if available], then Object > Expand) Select All (Select > Select All) Click ...


1

It is simply not possible to use any Pathfinder operation if an object contains a mesh. You may be able to use a clipping mask or opacity mask to hide a portion of your teardrop rather than trying to remove a portion.


1

You can only create your Figure B with shapes via Pathfinder. Strokes won't work. Simply overlap the two rectangles and choose Object > Expand. Then Pathfinder > Merge. This will give you Figure B. However, the black will not be a live stroke. You will end up with a black shape and two white shapes. If you need live strokes, simply draw a rectangle and ...


1

Draw your box filled with your pattern over the artwork. From here you have a couple options: This assumes your pattern has "holes" in it and is not a solid-filled pattern. Select all and click the Make Mask on the Transparency Panel. You may need to uncheck the Clip option on the panel or check the Invert option on the panel. Select the pattern box and ...



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