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7

Create the circle shape. Remove the fill. Give it a stroke that is as thick as the width you want. Go to Object → Expand.. in the top horizontal menu. Create a rectangle that's as thick as you want the gaps to be. While you still have the rectangle selected, hold Shift and select the circle. Use the alignment options to center it horizontally and ...


7

This is most effectively achieved by offsetting the path of the front shape, and subtracting the resulting shape from all the shapes in the back, using the Pathfinder. As an example, say I'd like to do the outlining with the blue shape as my front shape: Select the blue shape with the Move tool (V); Choose Object > Path > Offset Path...; Key in an ...


6

I made this in about 3 minutes using the circle tool, direct selection tool and live paint. I don't know if there's a faster way, but this was pretty quick. Basically, draw a circle and a smaller circle inside that circle. Draw a new circle that is the exact width between the left anchor point of the inner circle and the right anchor point of the outer ...


6

Select both circles and click the Divide button on the Pathfinder Panel. This will create 3 separate shapes. You can also simply grab the Live Paint Bucket Tool and click once on the circles to create a Live Paint Group, then continue clicking areas to fill them with color. When done click the Expand button on the control bar across the top of the ...


6

When exploring things like this it is best to use very rudimentary objects so you can see the differences. I started with the red circle and black rectangle. I then added a green/yellow stroke after the pathfinder operation so you can see edges better. As you'll notice each operation results in different artwork. The only two which are similar are Trim ...


5

You can simply draw a line and use Effect > Distort & Transform > Roughen to create a jagged line. Then copy the line, select both the "rough" lines and choose Object > Expand Appearance. Then select the end points and join them via Object > Path > Join. It's important to draw a separate line and apply the effect to just a line if you ...


5

It's an extremely simple shape. Why not just draw two rectangles and a triangle, arrange them accordingly and assign them a stroke with “rounded joints”. Then select them all and use Pathfinder's “Add” operation. That's it! This way, you can easily adjust the stroke thickness as required:


5

Quick and easy: Put your figure in the back. Set your text in the front. Turn your text into outlines. Select both. Pathfinder→Divide. This breaks the text into pieces using the back figure as the slice point. Use the white arrow to select the pieces of the text which overlay the figure. Color at will.


5

One quick and easy way to do this is with a Clipping Mask: I've got two text layers, one for green and one for purple. I duplicated the silhouette path and used it as a Clipping Mask for the purple text Another way is to use Blending Modes: The top silhouette is filled with blue and the Blending Mode is set to Overlay. Under that is a duplicate of ...


5

In Illustrator... Select it all, Pathfinder > Merge, click the red, hit delete. Or Select it all, grab the Shape Builder Tool, Hold down the Option/Alt and click-drag starting below the rings, to the center ring covered by red.


5

Notice on the tooltip that pathfinder minus says "minus front". It can subtract many things from one thing - out of everything you have in a selection the one thing in the back is what it subtracts everything that's in front of it. When I say "one thing", groups don't count. When you expanded the text you got a group, and expand text puts the first letter ...


5

By selecting both shapes and hitting Subtract on the Pathfinder Palette:


4

There's no trick or filter to making all-monochrome versions of your logo like this. I guess this designer simply drew the white contours so they would suggest the corresponding shapes in the colour version. Monochromising a logo can be quite an art.


4

This doesn't answer your question specifically (no "cutting" involved), but another less-permanent way to do this is with a clipping mask. Duplicate the circle and make sure it is above the art you want to remove. Then, select both the circle and the art, and do Object → Clipping Mask → Make. This will just "hide" the portion that you don't want to appear ...


4

If you want extremely fast solution, grab Ellipse tool and select options as on the picture: If you want perfect solution you should use Pathfinder panel cutting the circle with a cross.


4

I give you another answer, but there are a lot of options. Create a circle (Elliple tool->Shift+Click+Drag) and make desired stroke (i.e. 23 points) Next, press Object->Expand Next grab Type tool and type "+", then press Object->expand and resize and locate the cross along the circle. Then select all the shapes and press Minus front on pathfinder ...


4

Another way... Add an odd colored stroke to the primary object Choose Object > Expand Appearance (if available) and Object > Expand Select the primary object and all objects to be "trimmed". Hit the Merge Button on the Pathfinder Panel Click the odd colored stroke (which is now a shape) and hit delete the blue rectangle is locked in this ...


3

If the path is just a stroke, you merely need to delete a section and add the new section making certain the anchors are connected. Stroke rounding will be retained.


3

The reason why you are getting the weird shape cutout in your last image, is because the circle only has a stroke applied to it. Expand the circle with the stroke first, which will turn it into a fill. (Or you could go to "outline stroke"). From there, follow the steps and you will see it cookie cuts quite nicely.


3

Draw a shape which covers the area you want to remove. Select the new path and the continent. On the Pathfinder Panel (Window > Pathfinder), click the Minus Front button.


3

For a clipping mask, grab the circle and bring it to the front, select it and the 4, right click and choose create clipping mask.


3

This answer addresses if the above has THREE shapes and not two. Vincent's answer is correct if there are two shapes. I would take your designs as so: In this instance I would select ONLY the Polygons: Navigate to Object -> Compound Path -> Make or cmd+8: If I select everything: and do Pathfinder with an option of Minus Front on a design ...


2

Zooming is only a preview inside Illustrator. What counts is how it prints or how it displays in the final use (web, app, ...). My best guess for the effect that you are seeing is that Illustrator calculates the preview for strokes and for surfaces differently.


2

The Pathfinder Toolset is very good for some tasks, but it's not the only boolean operator in Illustrator. The Shape Builder Tool (Shift+M by default) is what I would recommend in this case. If you hold down Shift, you can delete the sections of lines that are between intersections of selected Items.


2

You can use Unite in the Pathfinder panel or you could use the shape Builder tool They work differently unite would be easier for this task. select the objects and click the unite button in the pathfinder panel. (window > pathfinder) to use shapebuilder first select the objects then drag the tool over the parts you want to combined (conversely ...


2

Make a copy of this file, just in case this is not the answer you seek. I would group the background first. Make a copy of it, paste it in place and lock it. Then, I would copy the light green circle. I would then use the light green circle to create a Clipping Mask so that you get all the knitted pattern inside the circle. You can then "paste in place" the ...


1

You can do it also with the scissors tool. Invoke it from the tools panel or just by pressing 'C'. With it you can click any path or shape and Illustrator will split it in two as you would do with your scissors. One good option to do that would be to draw the circle, divide with the scissors on top of the four anchor points to create the four quarters and ...


1

Sounds to me like your background object(s) are inheriting appearance attributes from the foreground object after you've applied the pathfinder operation. For example, when you use the 'Intersect' pathfinder operation, the intersecting area is retained - but also inherits the stroke and fill from the foreground item. It looks to me like your 'grain' has ...


1

Holding down the Option/Alt behavior changed at roughly CS4 (if I'm remembering versions correctly). I don't know if Adobe corrected or updated the help files accordingly (they often do not). The difference is in how the Pathfinder operation is applied and whether or not results are expanded. In Illustrator CS6, the default behavior of the Pathfinder Panel ...


1

Assuming the yellow needs to be removed from the mountain. Select the yellow and choose Object > Expand from the menu. This converts the strokes to shapes. Pathfinder doesn't work well with strokes, it needs shapes. Once the strokes are expanded you should be able to use Pathfinder to subtract the yellow shapes from the mountain (or anything else).



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