Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

No answer provides a more accurate result as conveniently as this one; and the source code for the soluton is provided. This will be a complementary answer about other directions you could take. First a filter based approximation of the pattern - like a crystalize effect as suggested by another contributor - like so: a fill color for the canvas (yellow ...


4

Here's an awesome tool that will generate the pattern for you: Flat Surface Shader for rendering lit triangles to a number of contexts including WebGL, Canvas 2D and SVG using Lambertian reflectance (see project details). Released under the MIT license. Perfect for web use, since it exports to svg.


0

You can use the burn tool to make the bottom part darker. I would use the Image you cropped out here to make the "burn" to fit and then crop it a use it. Does it make sense?


0

This question's vague, but if you're using Photoshop the Color Sampler Tool may be what you need. Accessible underneath the eyedropper tool, it looks like this: You can click specific points on your document, like say the blobs on your example image: And in the info panel the point's color values will be displayed: Hope that helps!


1

The fill tool doesn't add seams, it simply repeats the pattern putting it as adjacent tiles. The problem could be into the way you have resized your original image. When you scale a bitmap image, you create a new image with a different number of points, and the information used for the values of the pixels of the new image is obtained using an algorithm (in ...


0

Start with this: Create a new layer in 50% gray, then use Add Noise (about 3%, Gaussian) to make your flat gray layer grainy. Set it to Linear Light blend mode. Use the eraser / mask out the parts of the layer you don't want grain on, like the hill and sky: Now add a gradient map from teal at 0%, to beige at 60%, to white at 100%. Optional: Save ...


3

Let's say you have a layer. This layer has two fills. Your primary fill is blue. Your secondary fill is a gradient, with the angle somewhere between 85 and 60 degrees, from white (or black) 100% to white(or black) 100%. Your secondary fill sits on top of the primary. Apply film grain (or grain, depends on how you'd like your final graphic to look like) on ...


0

you can achieve a look that is similar by filtering a gradient with the "crystalize" filter you might not get the 3d effect you are looking for but it's quick and easy.



Top 50 recent answers are included