Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

Press-ready PDF files are almost always much larger in terms of file size due to flattening and expanding of objects. Note InDesign merely links to external images. However, a press-ready PDF must embed those links for proper reproduction.


2

This is known as the 'dreaded white-box' problem. It was fairly common about 10 years ago (less so now) and has to do with transparency issues when the artwork is flattened. Adobe have a fairly comprehensive trouble-shooting page about it here: https://helpx.adobe.com/creative-suite/kb/white-box-or-color-wash.html


2

I don't know for sure if there's a way to export a PDF from Numbers without keep all document information (background included)... My guess is that there is not. However, if you just need the numerical data from the Numbers doc, why not save it as an .xlsx file? You definitely CAN import that doc type into InDesign, the same way you'd import/place a photo ...


2

Export your file from InDesign as single pages. Then in Acrobat under File > Properties > Initial Display, set that to display as two-up with cover. Save if you want this to be the default PDF view. Close and reopen the PDF after setting the Initial View or in the View menu, choose Page Display > Two Page view to adjust the current open PDF This ...


1

In the pages panel, select the cover page thumbnail. Right-click it and select "Numbering & Section Options" In the Numbering & Section Options dialog, change the Page Numbering style to something like A, B, C or i, ii, iii and click OK. This will number the entire document in this style, and that's OK. Next, select the thumbnail for the page you ...


1

You are assuming that the client has illustrator and understands how to use it. It depends on what the files are used for, too. If I was sending a PDF to a printer, I leave it editable, in case the printer needs to adjust something before running the job. If you are really concerned about your client adjusting your files afterwards, you can send as EPS, or ...


1

When you send a PDF of your Illustrator file, make sure that the option to keep it editable is deactivated (by default, Illustrator adds the .ai information to the PDF, so that you can open it again and it works properly). If the purpose of sending the file to the client is to get comments or/and approval, you might also simply rasterize it (for example ...


1

Check your PDF save settings to ensure it is saving at 100% scale, and that the document bleed is not being included. Might be worth checking print settings to to ensure no bordering is being added, or that it is set too.


1

As far as I remember, InDesign does not produce a proper PDF with active elements; it involves (yuck!) Flash. A radical but reliable way would be to not include the active elements in InDesign, but add them in Acrobat. There you might add Checkboxes. To create a set of mutually exclusive checkboxes (behaving like radiobuttons, but allow to be unchecked), ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible