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9

If your image looks as it should when you zoom in there is nothing wrong with your image. OpenOffice may be resampling or compressing your image, but if it looks as it should at a higher zoom level then I assume that's not the problem. The problem is how Adobe Reader is rendering your image. It's physically impossible for any image to render perfectly at ...


6

Short answer: Never trust a .pdf viewer. Long answer: .pdf viewers are fallible. The PDF standard is very broad and has many applications. It displays files on-screen, and also creates print-ready files. Because of this broad application of the file type, there is no single .pdf viewer that can render all kinds of files acceptably all of the time. You ...


5

If you have Acrobat Pro, yes you can. I don't believe Acrobat Reader has this function. (These instructions may vary depending on which version of Acrobat you use. I'm using Adobe CC 2015) Open the PDF in Acrobat Pro. Under the "Tools" menu (top left), choose "Print Production", which is under the "Protect and Standardize" section: From the list on ...


2

This is caused because you've saved your PDF in the CMYK color space (I've seen this a lot before). Open your PDF, convert it's color mode to RGB, and then save it again. That will solve your problem.


2

None of these suggestions work or worked for me - I need something simple and bulletproof, and the final suggestion ("Checking this option: "Create Acrobat Layers from Top-Level Layers" worked for me. I also chose the Acrobat version 8") DIDN'T work, and still exported all the layers for me. I found the solution in that dialog box setting the eps file save ...


1

You could start in InDesign, export your text and a few different page layout options, and then customize for iOS. I've found that getting the interactivity to work using the prescribed Adobe methods is a pain, and the only place the interactive documents will really function anywhere close to 100% is when you export them to the Adobe Server. With the ...


1

Besides the answer DLev provided, you can open the pdf in other programs like Ilustrator and Corel Draw and use the normal eye droper. But there is a chance the pdf you have is not a production pdf. Sometimes an agency sends for a low resolution RGB file. RGB because it compresses better than CMYK on the embeded images. Your best witness are the flayers ...


1

This is a bit of a guess, but it's possible that the 140% ratio relates to the difference between 96dpi (which I think is the default DPI of OpenOffice) and 72dpi (the default DPI of Photoshop). Which is a ratio of 1.333. If you haven't already, try changing the DPI of your original image to 96. Don't resample it, just change its resolution. Go to Image-...


1

Inkscape cannot embed CMYK color profiles, sorry. Scribus can, though. Here's a workflow that I have successfully used to get a print-production-ready PDF (with the "ISO Coated v2 300% (ECI)" color profile properly embedded). It is taken from a more detailed article on my blog. A word of warning: The workflow involves converting colors manually, so if ...



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