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If you only care about the outside corners, you could use the round corner in stroke settings. This one is in Illustrator: And this one is in Photoshop: Like I said though, this will only make the outer corners round. The inner corners will still be sharp. The round corners stylize effect in illustrator is more versatile and controllable.


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You can make circles, and place them on all the corners of the shape. Then edit the original path so that the corners don't show up anymore. Here's a quick little diagram of what I mean: I don't find this a very reliable way to do it, however. What you need to use is Illustrator, or another vector based program. This is best for drawing shapes and symbols ...


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Those specific ornaments are part of Bickham Script Pro, which either came with your copy of InDesign (if you have a perpetual license version) or can be installed from Typekit (if you're on Creative Cloud). Many OpenType typefaces include ornaments. To find them, use the Glyphs panel (Type > Glyphs) and use the dropdown selector to view "Ornaments" and ...


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I'd hazard a guess that in 99.5% of uses such as this those flourishes are not drawn or created. Rather they are decorative glyphs found in any number of fonts. Here's one such font: http://www.myfonts.com/search/fleurons/fonts/ Simply pick the glyph you want and set it like you would any type character. If you really want to draw your own, it simply ...


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Create a closed shape with the Pen Tool. Add your vector stroke to it. Add a layer Mask (raster or vector) to your vector layer and mask away the section of the path you do not want visible. Unlike actual vector applications, Photoshop is not designed to create open vector paths. This is merely one of the shortcomings of Photoshop vector tools. You have ...



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