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37

It's closest to a view called a three-quarters view, in between a side view and top down one. It's "[a] method of portraying three dimensional space in a two-dimensional plane ... [very] popular during the 16-bit era for JRPGs." - TVTropes definition page. It's still used in games today because of the high performance and artistic draw. The style is ...


19

This is another method to do the job using illustrator Create a circle and select it go to Object>Pattern>Make adjust the spacing between circles in the pattern options panel and press Done Draw a rectangle and fill it with the pattern that we have just made; you may need to scale the pattern a little by choosing effects>distort & ...


15

It's not an easy task if you are seeking to be precise. Illustrator won't do this easily. You'd have to manually draw the overall shapes and adjust perspective, size, and value for each element. A mesh in Illustrator fails because it's very difficult to get hard edge conversion areas, in addition, meshes distort the underlying objects based on position of ...


13

I would consider just skewing the ramp 1 or 2 degrees and giving it a little dropshadow. It may not be real, but it gives the illusion of depth. Key is that your global illumination stays the same. This means that you let shadows cast the same way and that your light source is directed the same way. Otherwise it feels out of place Here is a simple ...


13

It's not truly perspective. It's an artistic interpretation of a 3D element, but not adhering to any mathematical perspective grid. The closest to a true type perspective would be one point perspective. It could also be considered foreshortening outside of the perspective context.


11

I don't think this illustration follows any of the strict formal Cartesian perspective models. If you try to find a vanishing point using edges that would have been parallel in the "real world" you will notice that there is none. The front of the car seems to follow, loosely, a one point perspective model. The rest of the car, though, follows an ...


11

Disclaimer: I don't own any of these images. I just found them using Google. Please don't sue me. I am poor. I would say, if you want to go for the classic Disney or realistic look, then use perspective for sure. And a bit more than what you should for a portrait. Take a look at these Mickey mouse heads and the placement of the eyes. They are definitely in ...


11

You can actually do this in Illustrator (as per request). The trick is to make sure that once you use mesh tool you drag the along handles back to 1/3 of the way along the edge otherwise it squeezes the image along*. In addition it can help to keep rotating the are back and forth, for easier selection. Image 1: doing the scruple. What i actually do is ...


11

hsawires' answer with envelope distort > make with mesh is the best answer, but there are some additional tricks you can use that make it easier to get the "the perspective effect in sharp folds" described (also, four very good answers clearly isn't enough :-D): Prepare your dots, any way you like... the great thing about Envelope Distort is, you can apply ...


10

As an alternative to @Scott's answer you could use Puppet Warp in Photoshop (Edit → Puppet Warp). If you try this, I would suggest a selecting Mode:Rigid and Density:Fewer Points in the options at the top in order to make the surface less pliable, like in your example. Just add pins and move them around until you achieve the desired displacement. ...


7

I would use a Mesh Envelope Distort. The easiest way to ensure that the text follows the same contours as the sticker is to recreate the sticker shape. In this case, it's very easy since the un-warped dotted-line "shadow" of the sticker will give us a good base line. Step 1: Re-create the Surrounding shape and Group it with Your Text Step 2: Create a ...


6

It's an animation combining two separate images that you'd typically see with a Stereoscopic drawing In this particular example, it's likely one source image that was modified to create the second image by shifting things around a bit. Things that you want to appear further out in space would shift further than those that you don't.


6

I'm thinking Google SketchUp might be perfect for that. [PRO] Export PDF and EPS: 2D vector images With the Pro version of Google SketchUp, you can export views of your models in PDF and EPS format, allowing you to continue to work on them in vector editing programs like Illustrator and Freehand. For 2D images that need to be ...


6

Layers Magazine had a good article on this a long time ago when I wondered the same question. Step 1 Begin with the Product Art For this tutorial, we created the artwork for the box in Photoshop that we’ll apply to a 3D object in Illustrator. The art consists of three separate flattened PSD files that we’ll place in Illustrator. The file for the front ...


6

I'm unclear if [a] includes the entire side or just the top path of that side. Reflect [a] on a vertical axis, from the left side, this provides [b]. Rotate [a] (or [b]) to a 90° vertical, this provides [c] Then simply duplicate, move, and align these segments to form the cube. Let's assume that [a] includes that entire side and not a single path. ...


5

You are doing wrong, That's why its not going the way you want to. you have to group/link both to get the desired effect What you have to do is : You have to write your code in your layer which you want to skew. After that link both text(you can rasterize text layer its not necessary when using skew) and background layer (select both layer and press link ...


5

An easy way is to redraw your arrow and use Illustrators 3D-Tools to do the perspective parts. You start by redrawing your arrow in 2D like this: Next up, apply your brick pattern to your arrow. Then you use Effect > 3D > Rotate Check the preview box and adjust the settings to your liking. (To bring in the perspective you need to adjust the ...


5

Distortion happens. :) Escher made a career out of playing with the natural distortion which happens in perspective. Based on question title -- No. Based on question in your post --- Yes (they are opposite questions :) ) For a natural appearance in 2 point perspective all items must fall between the 2 vanishing points. Any object which falls outside either ...


4

What you can use instead of Perspective is some skew on the right side (pardon my image, if you do it more carefully you will get a better result!): What you do is paste your image in a new layer, go to Edit > Transform > Skew, grab the right side (not the top or bottom points, the middle of the whole side) and move it down a little. Then, make ...


4

Roberto's image is good enough, but what I feel would add to the effect is if you use trapezoids instead of rectangles, with the wider end signifying the end which is 'up'. I guess that would complete the effect satisfactorily.


4

I'm not yet entirely clear about the question, but if I understand you correctly, here are the steps: 1: Create the curve as a path. 2: Use the "Type on a Path" tool to create the text. 3: Convert to a Smart Object. 4: Edit > Transform > Perspective. Since you're trying to overlay this on an existing image, you may have to add: 0: Trace the curve in ...


4

I'm no graphic designer, but have you thought about using gradients? For example: This could be your standard ramp. This could be your speed bump. Obviously, they'd have to look a little nicer than this. :P


4

boxshot.com Boxshot is dead simple. All you need is a flat image for each side of the package. It's not free though. It allows for complete 3D environment controls with reflections shadows and specular lighting. Will save, to most raster formats. It will not create vector formats. Price tag is worth it here, but may not be for others.


4

To draw a sphere inside a cube, you first need to find its center. This is indeed quite simple: just draw a straight line from each corner of the cube to the opposite corner. The point where the lines intersect is the midpoint of the cube, and thus also the center of the sphere drawn inside the cube: (If these lines don't all intersect at the same ...


3

This seem to be a pretty well explained article on the subject: Three Point Perspective At this point it's customary to explore the capabilities of 2PP in a variety of specific drawing problems. I want to keep the momentum and look at three point perspective, which allows you to construct a form in any orientation (from any viewpoint). ...


3

Providing that you already have a base plane with the right perspective (you can use a photo or make a quick render in Blender). Use the free transform tools (ctrl-click on the points to change the perspective) and make the points match the template picture you did before. Do this in one step to prevent the image to be re-interpolated further. Tip: ...


3

Try increasing the pixel count: if your image is 450px wide, double it to 900 and then downsample at the time of export. This will give you more pixels to work with when describing the curves and diagonals. As an aside, in computer graphics--especially games--you may have encountered anti aliasing methods such as "2x FSAA" What this means is that the ...


2

Well you have two problems with persepctive. One is that your 'paper' is not in perspective. The other is that you didn't make your code match the paper.... or be in perspective. See to put your paper in perspective using what you've already done you should still have two sides be parallel which you don't. Here is what I mean - you should have either the ...


2

I'd use the Warp Text>Arc Tool in this particular case. Here's an image showing the results:


2

How far away from perpendicular do you mean? Here's a generic "angle" that is basically pushing the upper right corner forward and down a little, but things like this is hard to describe in words so its probably best if you laid down a sketch of what exactly you mean. I also agree this would probably be better over at graphic design.



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