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0

How about doing it manually? You could print out dotted array in appropriate aspect ratio, manually fold printout to desired effect, photograph under well-lit conditions, threshold it in Photoshop & get paths via magic wand selection & import to Illustator & use pathfinder to isolate / colour.


11

hsawires' answer with envelope distort > make with mesh is the best answer, but there are some additional tricks you can use that make it easier to get the "the perspective effect in sharp folds" described (also, four very good answers clearly isn't enough :-D): Prepare your dots, any way you like... the great thing about Envelope Distort is, you can apply ...


19

This is another method to do the job using illustrator Create a circle and select it go to Object>Pattern>Make adjust the spacing between circles in the pattern options panel and press Done Draw a rectangle and fill it with the pattern that we have just made; you may need to scale the pattern a little by choosing effects>distort & ...


11

You can actually do this in Illustrator (as per request). The trick is to make sure that once you use mesh tool you drag the along handles back to 1/3 of the way along the edge otherwise it squeezes the image along*. In addition it can help to keep rotating the are back and forth, for easier selection. Image 1: doing the scruple. What i actually do is ...


10

As an alternative to @Scott's answer you could use Puppet Warp in Photoshop (Edit → Puppet Warp). If you try this, I would suggest a selecting Mode:Rigid and Density:Fewer Points in the options at the top in order to make the surface less pliable, like in your example. Just add pins and move them around until you achieve the desired displacement. ...


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It's not an easy task if you are seeking to be precise. Illustrator won't do this easily. You'd have to manually draw the overall shapes and adjust perspective, size, and value for each element. A mesh in Illustrator fails because it's very difficult to get hard edge conversion areas, in addition, meshes distort the underlying objects based on position of ...


0

As in the comments its not really an exact style. 8bit ish, Voxel ish, basically its hipster :) To go about making these, espescially for a game of any scale. I would use a pipeline of Illustrator (or Inkscape) and then import into Blender or another 3D program. While you could get away with making these in a 2D program. It'll be hard to maintain ...


5

Distortion happens. :) Escher made a career out of playing with the natural distortion which happens in perspective. Based on question title -- No. Based on question in your post --- Yes (they are opposite questions :) ) For a natural appearance in 2 point perspective all items must fall between the 2 vanishing points. Any object which falls outside either ...


0

What I found worked best was to have your pattern filling a normal square, then place your perspective shape on top of that, select them both and go to: Object> Envelope Distort > Make with Top Object


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I think the answer to your 1st question is "yes." As the viewer rotates, any arbitrary vanishing point is going to be a line from the center of the view to the horizon. This isn't a limitation, but rather a mere fact of reality. n-point perspective is always going to look synthetic. Artistically, playing with this in the manner you illustrate might give ...



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