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19

This is most probably a Gradient Map. Here's a quick how-to: Open your source image Set your foreground and background colours in the toolbox: the background colour should be lighter than the forground colour Add a Gradient Map adjustment layer (Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Gradient Map... or use the black/white circle icon in the Layers palette) This ...


16

Another option is to drop the saturation to 0 using Image > Adjustments > Hue/Saturation.... Next fiddle with the levels until you're satisfied ( Image > Adjustments > Levels... ). Some elaboration from Joonas' comment: First move the gray arrow as far to the left as you can without washing out all the blacks (It will do most of the work). Then move the ...


14

That’s a halftone. Halftone is the reprographic technique that simulates continuous tone imagery through the use of dots, varying either in size, in shape or in spacing, thus generating a gradient like effect. It can be achieved in Photoshop by choosing Filter → Pixelate → Color Halftone. The example you posted looks like the halftone version of the ...


12

How about a light box? They are cubes made of some sort of semi-translucent fabric that diffuses the light. You can probably find something like that in your local photography equipment store. Here is one: http://www.ezcube.com/ I made my own, though, out of cardboard and velum paper. And I used plain 100W lights instead of professional ones. Here is a ...


11

I'd agree with Dominic, the route I would go with is to take a better picture. However, I understand that's not always feasible. There's a filter in Photoshop that can help; it's appropriately called "Dust & Scratches". To apply it to an image, you can find it in Filter → Noise → Dust & Scratches.... You'll have to play with the Radius and ...


10

Here are some results I got: The steps for black ink are as follows: In Photoshop, put the bottle image onto a layer, and duplicate this layer. To do this, you can select the layer in the Layers panel and press Ctrl+J on Windows or Cmd+J on Mac. We will work with this duplicate layer only, which must be above the original. Use your favorite method to ...


9

I just started a new blog, so i decided to make a little tutorial on this. Here is the result: How it is done: Put the logo layer on the background and set blending mode to overlay or multiply (depends on the logo). Now hit CTRL+T or go to Edit > Free transform Adjust the anchorpoints as shown in the image below: You could play a little with the ...


9

Easiest way to blur stuff in photoshop is Blur Tool (R) Just take Blur Tool and select Soft Round Brush (The brush that is round and has 0 hardness) Then use various size(s), ones that are fitting to the area(s) that you want to blur of course. Then blur away. (You might want to make a copy of the image layer (Ctrl+J) before blurring. ) Original image (I ...


9

No need for a script (yet), I found a simple way. Hope it helps someone else too. If you want all the cutouts / slices to be of same size and cover whole image, resize or crop base image accordingly. Create one big slice, containing the whole image. Right click on the slice icon in the top left corner. Choose Divide Slice and define into how many slices do ...


9

Choose a nice image Colorize image with color you want with Color blending options Mute it down over your colored layer with transparency and Normal blending option. Or with Multiply blending options.


8

Looks like a radial blur. In photoshop you'd select Filter > Blur > Radial Blur and select the "Spin" option (as opposed to "Zoom").


8

In general, enlarge the image using Bicubic interpolation (sometimes, depending on the image, "Bicubic Smoother" works better, but usually straight Bicubic is more satisfactory), then either use Smart Sharpen to bring back the edge contrast, or copy the layer, set the blend mode of the copy to Overlay, and run Filter > Other > High Pass. Sometimes you ...


8

You might be able to achieve this using filters, but I would actually consider redrawing the photo entirely using Illustrator a similar vector tool. You can do this using the Pen Tool. To make things easier, start by pasting the photo you want to convert, and maybe turning it into B&W and increasing the contrast. That will give you a nice base to work ...


8

It's called posterization (as it was a technique to allow for making posters easier via screen printing, block printing, or lithography). The most common ways to achieve it: use the 'posterize' filter in your raster image editor of choice (photoshop, pixelmator, GIMP, etc.) use a vector tracing tool (as previously mentioned)


8

I found a quickish method! You had almost all of the workflow, and the 'cutout' part that you had, is what I was missing when trying at first. Starting with this image, because I couldn't find the one you're using: The longest part for me was masking out the background. You may also need to add a Black & White adjustment layer after step 2 if you're ...


8

As per my comment, this effect can easily be made with a gradient. Below is an image that has had a Gradient Map applied (purple & orange) and had the blending mode set to Screen. The potency of the effect is determined by the colors as well as the opacity. Playing around with different blending modes may also lead to some other cool results.


7

This looks like they applied the tilt shift effect to a photo of a monitor (or maybe they skewed a screenshot)


7

Actually, I have a better idea: if you start with a white T-shirt and set its layer mode to "Multiply", you can put the logo on a lower layer and it will automatically be shaded as if it was printed on the T-shirt. Better yet, you can also change the color of the shirt itself by putting a solid color layer below the logo. Let me demonstrate this technique. ...


7

I have had some luck "hacking Ikea" for similar projects. For greenscreen-effects, they even have bright green tables :D. This is but one alternative, and you find instructions here, at IkeaHackers With the use of two hampers, this is the result: But here is the real crux: succeeding with this, lighting is alpha and omega. You will need at least three ...


7

I'd suggest using the Multiply blend mode, with the image in front of the color layer. (Technically, with Multiply, the layer order doesn't matter, but having the image layer in front lets you adjust its opacity instead of having to tweak its color levels directly.) For example, here's my quick attempt to recreate the NYC image. I don't have Photoshop so ...


7

Open image in Photoshop Go to Filters > Other > Offset Adjust vertical offset so that the image seam is in the middle of the image Use the liquify tool to seamlessly connect the ribbons together Fail miserably Consider trimming all excess whitespace, and use background-size: contain instead More info on the background-size property


7

In GNU Image Manipulation Program (GIMP), you can halftone a photo with Filters > Distorts > Newsprint. On deviantART, istarlome provided a tutorial for halftoning in GIMP. Here's the gist: Create an image. Either open an existing photo or create a new canvas and apply a gradient. If the image has fine detail, use Filters > Blur > Gaussian Blur to hide ...


7

Nice question. Actually, I have a couple of tips for cropping a portrait (human figure) in a square shape. the eyes' position must be in the top 1/3 of the square. that means you can crop off the top of the head. show the background from a part of the cropped image. try to avoid that the head appears too big.


6

You can use the "slice" tool (looks like an x-acto knife, below the wand): select the rectangular area you wish to save using the slice tool. go to "save for web" use the "slice selection" tool to pick the slice(s) you wish to export, set your options and then save. in the save dialog, pick "selected slices" from the "slices" drop down at the bottom of the ...


6

This is called defringing, and Photoshop has a Defringe tool right under Layer > Matting. However, you might not even need that tool in most cases if you're using the Quick Select with Refine Edge in CS5, or the Extract filter in earlier versions.


6

This kind of composite requires two steps: a) get the perspective and form correct, and b) use blend modes and/or opacity adjustments to make it look real. Perspective and Form Use the Free Transform tool for simple perspective adjustments. Use the Vanishing Point filter for trickier situations, or where it has to look exactly right based on the ...


6

The way I deal with glass is to cut out the glass section using the polygonal select tool and remove it to its own layer. From there I drop the opacity in layers panel to 20% and bump up the exposure buy a little, drop the offset by quite a lot and increase gamma correction quite a bit too. This give a nice transparent effect which isn't perfect but is ...


6

Would this be better? What I did, was actually adding a Curves adjustment layer and then edited curve for each individual colour channel. This could also be a starting point to add other obivous elements to the image itself, to correct it as much as possible (like those different tint bars at top)... Outcome So if you're after one step process, then ...


6

Knew this style looked familiar. Took me whole day to remember what plugin it was. ( Not 100% sure the same plugin was used in your example image, but it's at least very similar ) Fractalius filter plugin Fractalius plugin creates unusual, eccentric artworks in a single step. The effects are based on extraction of so-called hidden fractal texture of ...


6

It doesn't look "bad". But the reason the expression isn't conveyed very well is the lack of subtle definition. The expression on Steve's face is a subtle grin or smirk. This is primarily expressed through the shadows on his face, not the existing hard edges. The shadows under the eyes, on the right side of his face, and under the nose are what defines his ...



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