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First question. Print where? 1) If you are printing from home use the same aplication you are working in. 2) To print photos. The first option is to print from the original jpg extracted from your camera. If you are shooting in raw, do your processing you need and generate your jpg, the less compression you put, the less the artifacts will show. That also ...


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It depends a lot on where you print, what printer will be used for the task and what you need to do with the files. You might want to stay away from anything JPG because of the compression, that's a start. It can work for huge formats but they are used more as a last option; for example, if you cannot upload a banner of 300mb for printing, you might ...


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Totally depends on print house. Usually they take raw/psd/ai/eps files, pdf is also an option to convert all of those. Each print bureau have their own standards e.g. transparency flattened, pdf below 1.4 version etc. Among tiff, jpeg, jpeg2000, bmp, png - those are rarely used in real print houses. However tiff and bmp have no loss and therefore ...


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PDF, EPS, TIFF or native application files (.ai, .psd, .indd). If they are strictly photos... .tiff or .psd For Indesign files, .pdf For Illustrator .ai or .eps or .pdf, but in some cases .tiff works better.


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I use Dropbox for these situations. I upload, for example 500 images in new folder, then share it with my client and then he adds comments on each image, pretty much the same idea as already in first answer, but take a look, maybe helps: Dropbox - manage files


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I'm not sure if this will be good enough to handle that huge quantity of pictures, but it's a very nice collaborative tool for designers and get comments on pictures. I like to use HightailSpaces for that kind of thing. You can create "Space" that are like folders that you share with your client, and upload your pictures there. On each Space, you can have ...


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OK, You have a 20Mpx image. Lets do some math. 18" at 300 ppi 54" at 100 ppi 108" at 50 ppi 50 ppi is TOTALLY FINE for a photo that big. That is a pixel arround of half a milimeter. If you are really paranoid Xo) you could double the resolution with a bicubic Sharper option on Photoshop. I mean 200% (Not 123.456% or anithing else) Perhaphs you can ...


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Whether it's "worth it" is entirely subjective and will depend on the particular design you have, the particular design of the booth itself, and the needs of the audience looking at it. In general, no, it's rarely worth it--if ever, as these are just background images that no one is going to be looking at from 2' away with any real scrutiny. As for a ...


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It is possible to compose a bigger image from tiles. Best should prefeerably be done with a tripod, that has a panoramic head. But a normal tripod, works quite well. Sometimes even a free hand photo works ok. Obviously the backdrop needs to be semi static for this to work out. You should probably run this over on phptography.se for best tools (or search ...


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The name for this type of layout is called knolling. This term originated in 1987 though I believe the popularity of this sort of style blew up due to the Things Organized Neatly blog.



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