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9

On the Brush Palette click on the arrow to load Square Brushes. See image below, might look a bit different if you're on CS6, I'm not too sure:


7

Joe Gillespie did some great micro screen font work under the MiniFonts moniker. These are still available via MyFonts. Silkscreen is a related design by Jason Kottke.


7

Per Philip's request, I'll turn this into an answer: The only real solution is to pick the pencil tool and get to redrawing/touching-up by hand. Alas, there's no magic filter for this. JPG/MPG is lossy compression. By definition you've lost image data that you're not going to get back. Others have suggested some automated ways that could help, for sure, ...


6

You can set up a a Grid in the Preferences to have a grid line every .5pt (same as px in AI). Then turn on Snap to Grid in the View Menu. This will allow you to snap to .5px increments. However, it is not going to matter. While you can place an object at a 1/2 pixel (or 1/2pt in Illustrator), upon output everything is adjusted (anti-aliased) to full pixels. ...


5

Inkscape This powerful vector graphics application is free, cross-platform, and Open Source. It comes with an inbuilt function to trace vector graphics from bitmaps. These are the steps involved: File - Import...: choose to "embed" the bitmap. Select the embedded bitmap. Choose Path -Trace Bitmap.... This will open the following dialog: Make the ...


4

You haven't been very clear about your exact goal. I think you want to do two things: clean up the compression artifacts, then downscale the image while maintaining crispness. For the compression artifacts, there are lots of JPEG recovery utilities that produce pretty good results, though not perfect, and I don't know how well they work with pixel art. If ...


4

Lots of great pixel fonts at FontsForFlash.com


4

Double-headed arrow. 16px version: 100px version for clarity: Different style, 16px: 100px:


4

No you should not use anti-aliasing for pixel art You can draw by hand or on the computer but in the end you need to use the pencil tool for the majority of the work you do on the computer, that's the whole idea behind "pixel art." I have no idea what you mean by the rest of your question, are you trying to do anti-aliasing by hand? That doesn't really ...


3

I'm not proficient in the program, but it can be done in Inkscape. I'm sure someone will swoop in and explain it in inkscape. One thing I noticed when I zoomed in on the image is that there is an impreciseness with those squares in your image. Whoever made this image used alternating row width of 7 pixels and 8 pixels which makes it slightly more involved of ...


3

If you have Photoshop extended (with 3D) you can do the following steps. I am not trying to make an exact replica here, just showing roughly the steps you can take to create something like this within Photoshop. Open a new project, here I'm using 800x600 pixels From the 3D menu, select: Then rotate your cube in the position you want (or camera which can ...


2

I would build a segment by hand and then apply it as a pattern. You could also build the segment in Illustrator and create a pattern brush with it.


2

I was able to achieve something similar, try the following: Click the screenshots for full resolution Create a new document with relatively small dimensions. Select the Pen tool, change the size to 1px Edit the Brush settings (Window → Brush) for Spacing I set Spacing at 750% Edit the Brush settings for Scattering I set Scatter at 1000% and ...


2

The commonality between the units in this case is that they are normally both defined over a scale. Short distances are measured with a ruler, that has a scale from one end to the other Large distances with a scale on a map Thermometers have a scale on them too. I would therefore show some kind of graduated scale.


2

Vectors might change the rules a bit in some specific cases, but generally speaking, there is no 0.5px increment. (Unless we're talking CSS px on retina devices, but that's a whole different topic) A pixel is the smallest unit on a monitor. In the above image, each set of one red, one green, and one blue light is a single pixel. The device tells the ...


1

In the case the character's legs are just vertical triangles, I can imagine the walk only by "scissors" movement, i.e. horizontal shift of lower vertices one to another. Your picture is very blurred, it is difficult to realise what is happening there. Probably, it is worths to create more complicated character. - if you open this image in gif-editor, ...


1

Flash > Preferences > PSD File Importer > Compression > Lossy / Lossless Does that help at all? There are also other settings for import there. You would have to check with whatever flash you are using, as you did not state, this is the location of lossy/lossless import in CS5.


1

I don't have a direct answer, since I think you are asking the wrong question. You are correct that "baked-in" lighting effects look good only from specific angles and are a problem when you have no control over the light source and the viewport (aka camera angle). The main way to cheaply specify "local shading" on a 3d object is through the use of bump ...


1

You can download some good pixel fonts from FontsBase.com


1

For t you can combine all three symbols in one icon, or alternatively create 3 icons - each one is activated when proper scale is chosen: Probably it is better to separate t and l to two different icon/options


1

There is a Photoshop plugin for creating grids that it is called GuideGuide


1

To change the grid to a specific size go to: Edit > Preferences > Guides, Grid & Slices There you have the option to change the default values of Gridline Every x number of pixels/centimeters etc.. To use the gird: Go to: View > Show Grid. Note: Make sure the option "Snap to grid" is checked: View > Snap > Snap to Grid On topic, ...


1

Most pixel artists who work with a reference image are content to work with those images after they have been resized to the target resolution. You can then duplicate that on a layer, adjust the transparency, and lock it on top; letting you easily compare your pixel rendition to what the automated version produced. I suppose one could imagine some detail ...


1

I'm not sure if this answers your question, but have you tried scaling it in photoshop using Image Size with Nearest Neighbour (preserve hard edges) selected in the Resampling dropdown? That gives you a lossless size increase...


1

It is possible, what you need here is to have a vanishing point. Instead of having a 'horizon' vanishing point though, on this poster it's a (more or less) random point on the canvas. The image below may help you visualize the idea of vanishing point use. To make life easier, Photoshop has a tool that helps you with vanishing points (I believe it's also ...



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