Hot answers tagged

40

Yes, simply use "Nearest neighbour" as the resample algorithm in the "image size" dialog (image -> image size) Edit: @CAI gives a nice tip - "It's also worth mentioning, if you don't want any distortion at all, multiply the scale by whole multipliers (so 2x, 3x, 4x or 200%, 300%, 400% etc.)"


28

Just think of pixel like an atom. The atom is a smallest particle of matter. Where as a pixel is a smallest particle of digital image. An atom has neutron, proton & electron whereas a pixel has red, green & blue values :) The number of pixels per inches or centimeter (cm) etc. is called the "resolution". A higher resolution means more pixels per ...


20

File > Save for Web and then enter the pixel dimensions by clicking the Image Size tab on the right of the Save for Web window. Or am I not understanding you correctly?


12

If a client of mine asked for a 1920x1080px image, the first thing I need to know the intended use. Is it for the web, print, or both? In the print world, a pixel (or picture element - [pict-el]) has no meaning or definition. Pixels can not be measured in any way. They have no predefined size or unit in order to calculate their size. Therefore are not a ...


11

In the top right corner fly out menu of the transform panel, you can select or deselect "Align New Objects To Pixel Grid" globally for all future objects/paths (see below image) For each already created path/object use the checkbox in the transform panel itself The paths within the symbol might be set to "Align To Pixel Grid". Disabling it for the specific ...


11

Using File → Save for Web and entering the dimensions will do what you're after. Also, Illustrator uses vector scaling, so the results are better than if you tried the same thing in Photoshop — entering dimensions that don't match the document in Photoshop means the image will be bitmap scaled. Please note that you have to click Apply after changing the ...


11

Pixel fonts aren't terribly different from tiny print fonts when you get right down to it*. The one big exception is that you know what the medium will do with pixel fonts -- a very big advantage. There really isn't an ideal pixel grid, per se. Obviously a larger grid gives you more room to work. The smallest types I've seen work successfully are 7px ...


10

As people have commented, coding would yield the best solution. You can get a good approximation using Image > Adjustments > Gradient Map... Fill a canvas with 400% noise: Filter using Pixelate > Mosaic... Increase the saturation: And re-tone the image with Gradient Map: Result:


9

There is a very fast and efficient method to remove single pixel noise from a transparent background shown in this example picture: Use the fuzzy select tool to select the fully transparent background with following settings: Select Antialiasing Select Feather Edges Adjust feather radius to include the size of all noize pixels. Tick Select transparent ...


9

As of GIMP 2.8, the way to paint with a 1 pixel brush using the pencil tool is setting the brush size to "1" in the Pencil tool options, when painting, regardless of Brush's shape or native size. In previous GIMP versions, the "pixel" Brush which was an image one pixel in size was available in the UI. It is currently hidden, and available only for scripts ...


8

Joe Gillespie did some great micro screen font work under the MiniFonts moniker. These are still available via MyFonts. Silkscreen is a related design by Jason Kottke.


8

It depends on what results you want. If you want it to look "blocky" (i.e. each pixel in the original becomes a square in the result) then MrMerrick's answer is correct. If you don't want it to look either blurry or blocky then you need a dedicated pixel art scaling algorithm. I'm not sure if such algorithsm are available for photoshop, I did find a plugin ...


8

Another possibility, here; try drawing your images using vector shapes. There is a little time investment, but the potential afterwards could pay dividends. Start by setting your grid size (say grid line every 10 pixels, with only 1 subdivision). Turn on grid snap. Using the pen tool draw your shape. For any parts of the shape that are separated (i.e. on a ...


7

Short answer: One pixel can contain one color (and one value for opacity, but that's not relevant here). The different letters/number you see in your color code are the values that constitute it. HTML colors are defined using a hexadecimal notation (HEX), those are the letters/numbers you see, and they are the combination of Red, Green, and Blue color ...


6

There is a computer science paper (really, fun memo) titled, "A pixel is not a little square" by Alvoy Ray Smith. A pixel is a point sample. It exists only at a point. For a color picture, a pixel might actually contain three samples, one for each primary color contributing to the picture at the sampling point. We can still think of this as a point ...


6

As you put it, vectorizing every pixel makes no sense. Imagine you vectorize every pixel and then resize it. You simply have bigger squares. The exact same thing happens if you change the ppi on an output, you have bigger pixels. You do not need to resample it. You want to get rid of the blurriness. That is a totally different issue. That happens when ...


5

Ok turns out that the 'Hardness' setting of 1 was the problem... I thought that hardness would affect antialiasing of the edge of the brush, and that a one pixel brush would need to have a hard edge or it would be invisible. It seems that the edge is not within the brush width, but around it, so that a one pixel brush with an edge is three pixels wide ...


5

After a few minutes more of poking around in Gimp I finally noticed that the selection tool had an anti-aliasing option, that was turned on. If this is not selected you get hard edged fills.


4

No you should not use anti-aliasing for pixel art You can draw by hand or on the computer but in the end you need to use the pencil tool for the majority of the work you do on the computer, that's the whole idea behind "pixel art." I have no idea what you mean by the rest of your question, are you trying to do anti-aliasing by hand? That doesn't really ...


4

Lots of great pixel fonts at FontsForFlash.com


4

In the Image Size option menu, you will not have pixel as a unit in the "Document Size" pane. But the pane above it, "Pixel Dimensions" you have a choice of using px or % as units.


4

you're probably best to do this when setting up a new document in the document set up dialogue box. i think you can also turn it off in the preferences which would be a good idea because in my experience it does nothing but cause trouble!


4

If you are planning to use photoshop for making your logo, here is how, I think, you can go for it: 1) create a new blank document, with your desired dimension. 2) Use any bold(thick) font and type "SBS". 3) Add stroke to the text, by double clicking the text layer, via Layer Styles. 4) Create a rectangular box (U), and duplicate it as many times as you ...


4

Sadly, menu Extensions -> Render -> Grids > Grid... does only take pixels as the measurement. So I am pretty sure conversion is the way to do it. I find the easiest, most accurate way to do conversion calculations for Inkscape is to do it in Inkscape. Use the rectangle tool to draw a rectangle on the canvas, then in the tools control bar for the rectangle ...


4

The term "pixel" is short for "picture element". An image has consists of pixels, which are just colored dots in a rectangle, with no size. To show the image, we use a screen that can show colored dots, and need to decide which dots we want to show where. Looking at the details, the image consists of separate dots, each with a separate color. Like when ...


4

One more confusion to complete the discussion: In website design and layout, one "CSS pixel" is always equal to 1/96th of a "CSS inch", regardless of screen resolution. This was done because so many early websites used pixel-based measurements for layout assumed a standard screen resolution. In order that the actual size of text and other content ...


4

"Pixel Hinting" is a bit of a contrived term by the author of that article. Nothing wrong with it, but the term is typically reserved for type design. Traditionally, font hinting was the process of manually creating raster images of each vector glyph for each particular screen size deemed necessary. So, for example, at 9px on screen, the default vectors may ...


4

The confusion begins when you think you need to adjust how you work simply because you are working on a retina display. You do not. Treat your machine as you always have. Don't adjust your workflow due to the hardware you are using. Basically forget you are working on a retina display. Now, to support retina display in projects, you need 2 images - one ...


4

By using the INFO panel You can find the some details such as pixel coordinates, color parameters in the pixel where the cursor. To get the INFO panel, go to Windows>Info or press F8 key. If you want to change the unit, do as below image. To find the size(Width & Height) of particular region, use Marque tool and select the region. It will show the ...


4

That is called a subpixel. A) A pixel you see on your screen is in reality a group of 3 pixels of the primary colors R+G+B B) We can have any shape of one color above other. Black shape over a white background. C) We have the concept of aliasing, which is making pixels not entirely of one color, but smoothing into the surrounding color, this makes the ...



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