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19

It's due to the Index Color mode. GIF and PNG8 use a locked color palette, therefore the layer gets locked to prevent unsupported changes. It's also why the layer is titled Index. To unlock it choose Image > Mode > RGB from the menu.


9

As people have commented, coding would yield the best solution. You can get a good approximation using Image > Adjustments > Gradient Map... Fill a canvas with 400% noise: Filter using Pixelate > Mosaic... Increase the saturation: And re-tone the image with Gradient Map: Result:


7

It's going to largely depend on the original size. Photoshop is many things, but it's not magic. It can do some fairly impressive things with pixel interpolation but there's a limit. I would suggest using "Image" -> "Image Size..." and scaling it that way - at least it will scale consistently. I am not quite sure how exact you need to be when you say "any" ...


6

You should be exporting directly to the pixel dimensions you need from the original Illustrator file. You'll probably do just fine altering the size in the save for web dialog rather than creating a scaled vector version for every instance.


6

I'm sure there are other (better?) alternatives, but S-Spline interpolation creates pretty good-looking images. A quick Google search revealed this tool: PhotoZoom Pro. Also, here's a lengthy comparison of different interpolation techniques and tools: Digital Photo Interpolation - what is the best image resizing / resampling method?


4

Grid is not a vector object, therefore you can't fill it. The best way to do what you want is drawing the shape you want to fill using the Bezier line tool with "snap to grid" option on. (As I can see on your screenshot this option is enabled for you). Then your drawing will fit the grid as you place points. The final step: fill your shape with the color ...


4

The best way is to start with a 16x16 file and hand tweak each pixel.


4

You can't, at least practically speaking. An image only has so many pixels. To enlarge the photo, you either need to make the individual pixels bigger (it will be noticeably pixelated) or you need to make up extra pixels in between (it will typically be noticeably blurry). For slight enlarging, the latter is usually acceptable--especially with some careful ...


3

You should rasterize it in the right pixel dimensions directly from Illustrator whenever possible, but when you're resizing things in Photosohop there is a choice of resampling modes: Nearest Neighbor - This is the simplest form of resampling, if you can even call it that, where the original pixels are just expanded to the next full pixel to fill the new ...


3

Voxels are by definition 3 dimensional elements but your graphic has no 3 dimensional information to it. You will need to somehow define 3D information for your shapes. One simple approach would be to import your vector image into a 3D tool (3ds max, Maya, Blender, etc.) and extrude the shape. However the 3D model generated this way may not look like what ...


3

I think the usual trick is to scale down so that you lose resolution and then scale up to magnify the low-res image. So with Imagemagick, something like this: convert -scale 10% -scale 1000% original.jpg pixelated.jpg UPDATE: if you just want to be able to specify a single "pixelation amount" value, then the above command can be wrapped in a shell script ...


3

There are good plugins for that: onOne Perfect Resize (formerly known as Genuine Fractals) AKVIS Magnifier I prefer onOne's one. You can try them for some period of time before buying.


3

I think the main features you're after are: Being able to paint with a non-antialiased pencil or brush. Nearest neighbour scaling (keep blocky things blocky when you scale). Non-antialiased selections. Layers. Being able to export the formats you'll need (PNG? GIF?). Based on that criteria, I'd highly recommend Photoshop, predominately using the Pencil ...


2

With this particular image, I'd scale it up with Image Size at 200%, using bicubic interpolation, and then correct the issues. The only areas where pixelation will be noticeable will be: the arrow symbol. Was that based on a dingbat font symbol? If so, should be easy to recreate. the right hand angled outline. Copy a rectangular area from just left of the ...


2

171x100 pixels gives you an image that is slightly more than 1/2 inch wide at 300 pixels per inch. I'm taking a guess that this is not the size you specified in the Illustrator document, which is why your output was pixellated, and when you worked in inches inside Photoshop you then got a correct result in Illustrator. A 2 inch image at 300 ppi is 600 ...


2

There is many ways to accomplish that dept of field effect you are looking for, so I'll just link you to some of the tutorials I found: http://www.ephotozine.com/article/creating-shallow-depth-of-field-using-gimp-9722 http://tutorialgeek.blogspot.com.ar/2011/02/fake-depth-of-field-in-gimp-dof.html http://gimpguru.org/tutorials/simulateddof/ ...


2

If you have ruby installed this might be a possible option for you. See this gist https://gist.github.com/71598aeb1d823c9229ac It uses chunky_png to pixellate the image, so you may need to adapt the code slightly if you want to produce other file formats. For more information about it see this link ...


2

For screen or print? For screen, the resolution setting is ignored. What matters is the number of pixels you are using and the resolution of the screen itself. An Apple retina screen is going to look a lot smoother than a non retina screen, as it has a lot more pixels per inch, for example. In addition, there's the issue of anti-aliasing, which is where ...


2

Take a look at Sketch. It has made big strides toward being your next favorite UI tool. It's vector based but supports raster export. It supports a pixel preview mode similar to Illustrator but I think it does a better job with the vector to pixel output conversion overall.


2

I would build a segment by hand and then apply it as a pattern. You could also build the segment in Illustrator and create a pattern brush with it.


2

I was able to achieve something similar, try the following: Click the screenshots for full resolution Create a new document with relatively small dimensions. Select the Pen tool, change the size to 1px Edit the Brush settings (Window → Brush) for Spacing I set Spacing at 750% Edit the Brush settings for Scattering I set Scatter at 1000% and ...


2

There is no way for an algorithm to know exactly how you'd like an aliased edge to look when resized. The program doesn't know what you're trying to draw. So if you try to resize a shape with absolutely no anti-aliasing whatsoever, you may get unwanted results. This problem has been somewhat curbed with the latest content-aware updates to PS, but it has not ...


2

When evaluating graphics software for pixel art this is the kind of tools I'm looking for: The most well known software that is also great for pixel art is Photoshop. If you don't have access to it and are looking for the next best alternative, look at GIMP. I've been happily using it on Macs since around 2010 and it has everything you need for pixel ...


1

There's a whole category "grain scan" products that are created for just this type of effect. They're produced by companies that actually scan exposed and developed films expressly for the purpose of capturing the grain pattern to replicate the effect of that specific film with a digital image. Most of these products are geared toward video production and ...


1

Contrast+Blur+Saturation+Grain Select your background copy layer and apply a blur – Filter>Blur>Motion Blur Increase Contrast – Layer>New Adjustment Layer>Brightness and Contrast Increase Saturation – Layer>New Adjustment Layer>Hue and Saturation Create some grain by re-selecting your Background copy layer then do the following – ...


1

When scaling in Photoshop, make sure to select "Bicubic Smoother" (best for enlargements). Then you can always run the Unsharp Mask filter over the image to sharpen it up (it will still come out a little blurry). But honestly if you want to get the best enlargements you can, try the Genuine Fractals plugin (apparently now called "Perfect Resize") from OnOne ...


1

Select the item and do Modify > Transform > Remove Transform (Command + Shift + Z). It will restore it to the original size. Also, if you turn on check ‘Allow Smoothing’ in the properties for the PNG it will not look so pixelated when you scale it down or rotate it.


1

If you're trying to communicate the message that the encrypted image is unrecognisable as the original image, with a 'before' and 'after' pair, then at least part of the 'after' image has to be unrecognisable as the original. Assuming it has to be both unrecognizable, and immediately recognisable, that sounds impossible... but one way to do it would be ...


1

Blender will let you import a path or create a path that you can extrude into 3D. Once you have the model you should be able to use the link you posted to voxelize your object.


1

The Liquid Rescale plugin for GIMP resizes (smaller, larger, different aspect ratios) images using seam carving which is able to find the least significant lines of a photo and add or remove those lines. Since I don't understand the algorithm very well, I can't explain it, but it essentially lets you resize and/or rescale images without loosing quality.



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