New answers tagged

-1

There seems to be no current way to upload images to use as a profile picture or to your photo album which Facebook will not convert to a lower quality of JPEG.


0

I have been using CS5 for a number of years and don't recall ever running into this problem before. The part of my design that is "streaking" with the small random white lines is a simple silhouette I used live trace on. It was not occurring on any of the other objects in my design. A simple web search brought me here and I tried a few of the suggestions ...


-1

If you use an old version of Photoshop, like me, you can choose 'save for web' and choose PNG24. If you require a smaller file, you can use tinyPNG. This will give you the same result as the PS CC export. :-)


4

You need to save you image as a 32 bit PNG. When saving your PNG from Photoshop, make sure you select 'PNG-24' with transparency checked (the missing 8 bits from the 32 bit PNG you need). PNG-8 (in Photoshop) only supports 1-bit transparency, which means every pixel is either transparent or not, which is why you get the jagged edges. According to this ...


0

Oh. Do not save your png as 8 bit image, save it as 32 bit image. That uses a alpha channel to make the transparency smooth. The option you choose (just 8 bit) makes thoose jaggy borders.


2

From the Inkscape wiki FAQ: There is a limitation in the way Inkscape imports raster/bitmap images (e.g JPEG, PNG, TIFF images): it cannot read the image resolution. Inkscape assumes a 1-to-1 relation at 90dpi, so any imported image with a different resolution will appear to be scaled. That explains the difference in size you are seeing: 600px at ...


0

I don't believe this is possible the way you are describing it. You could make a version with a color background, save it, and make the content of the second file the thumbnail for the original. What operating system are you using? Here's a tutorial for OSX: http://apple.co/1Wu27K0 Here's a tutorial for Windows 8: http://bit.ly/247Uy1J Let me know if you ...


0

From illustrator. I normally save as SVG then it will look sharp on a a screen and will re size nicely on gadgets. Then you dont need to worry about screen resolution


5

Traditionally, screen resolution has been 72dpi, though newer high-res monitors like Apple's Retina displays can go up to 400dpi. That said, when saving images for the web, image resolution doesn't really matter. Most people will export at 72dpi, but the most important thing to do is to export at the pixel dimensions at which the image will be displayed. ...


-1

72 dpi is best for web or 92 dpi for retina displays. 300 dpi is generally only for print. Using it for the web will just make a bulkier file.



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