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7

Your position is unusual but not that unusual, and you're lucky that, more than in other trades, good design recruiters are usually more interested in the quality of your portfolio and what it shows of your aesthetic sense, creativity and ability to meet a brief than they are in doing a box-ticking exercise on your resume. (but not all recruiters are good ...


6

Common sense would indicate that: if you are going for an "adult entertainment" related job, then do include such works in your portfolio and in your resume if you are going for a non-adult job, then don't include such works in your portfolio or your resume. If you regularly go for both types then by all means have two separate portfolios and resumes. ...


6

Should designers put ALL of their works in their portfolio? My answer is NO. A portfolio is a collection of your best work. Not EVERYTHING you've done since kindergarten. However, I DO feel that a portfolio should be tailored for who you are showing it to just like a resume. If you are presenting to a client that wants you to do their website, then ...


5

A portfolio should sum up the work you have done and the impression you are trying to give. Generally speaking ,if you are a web designer, a portfolio fo print work would be less relevant than your web design work so you would promote your web design work over your print work. Think of it like a colourful CV/resume. You would taylor it to the job you are ...


5

If your work consists of posters, brochures, business cards that were produced and used, then you should have the paper quality that the client got. Basically you should have in your portfolio some examples of stuff you have done. If you only have your work digitally, I would simply go for the best paper possible, the most expensive and/or best fitted to ...


5

Definite No. It is tough to know where to draw the line though, particularly if you have a lot of pieces that you look at as similar quality. You should ask peers what is your best work(s), but more importantly, what is/are the worst. If you get a consistent answer for that, you are hurting yourself, even if it does establish diversity/range. I think the ...


4

Look, you're a designer just starting out, and it sounds like you've shown enough talent to be noticed by a reputable client. You're off to a good start. Let's look at your career path from a long term perspective. As a free-lance designer, you're going to start out not making very much cash, and working hard to advance to bigger and better (and higher ...


3

I think in general the answer depends on where in your career you are. Early in your career, (good) recruiters may be even more interested in the process than the end results: your skills will improve quickly on the job, but if you don't know how to go about developing ideas, understanding client's needs and making it all work, that's much harder to learn ...


3

In my experience, a good portfolio is (almost) all you need. Experience is of course very, very valuable, but if you have been freelancing and you can showcase your work, everything else will come second. If I have to hire another designer, I don't care about their training. Now, of course, I am not a company or a studio. For them, having experience in the ...


3

Write a really good cover letter Your prospective employer, if they're worth working for, wants to know where your passions lie and that you can communicate well. Depending on what kind of org you want to work in, show a little personality and skip the overly formal accountant-type letter. Make sure your work samples rock Once you have their interest, ...


3

What I'd suggest is first check if there are any open positions that fit your skills, and then maybe also write cold applications (they may not be very likely to get you a job, but you never know). Write a short letter explaining why you are valuable (as usual) and add a portfolio with your best pieces. As it was said before, I also think it counts a lot ...


3

Here my two cents... Typically, there's some sort of agreement or contract laid out. If there is no contract, legally, I don't believe there's anything the client can say or do. I mean, there's nothing to prove anything. Often times an artist may also specify that they may use the work as part of their portfolio. Other times a client may buy exclusive ...


3

There is really no definitive answer to this question. It's generally best to shoot for around 10 give or take one or two. But, there is no rule. While I don't really know what content you are referring to with "is it ok to borrow content from websites or other work" - it is generally unacceptable to "borrow" anything for a portfolio. The purpose of a ...


3

I was wondering on what kind of paper should I take the print outs of my work? The kind of paper depends on what you are printing. If you are printing stationary then actually get it printed the card stock they recommend. If you are printing brochures then actually get the printer to fold it for you. Actual demos of your portfolio work gives a ...


3

Like coding, graphic design is really about creative thinking and problem solving. Also like coding, any test you could give likely emphasizes implementation skills more so than creative thinking. IMHO, these types of tests check for the understanding of particular code syntax or a particular piece of software...both skills that are easy to learn, so ...


3

I was recently involved in helping to recruit a new designer and I was asked to design the part of the interview that would test for the right kind of practical creative thinking. What I went with - which seemed to work quite well and got very useful results - was to give each candidate a plausible very basic brief (everyone gets the same one, naturally) ...


3

If this is for an interview I would suggest tailoring the best 10 pieces you have for that company and putting it in a portfolio. We do have a similar question that might also be useful to you: "What type of paper should I use for print outs for a physical portfolio?" You could always re-iterate that you have more work, if they would like to see it, on ...


3

Copyright is copyright. Whether you are making money off it or not is irrelevant (though, note that you ARE making money off of it as you're using it for promotional purposes). For use in an in-class project? Likely no big deal in the grand scheme of things. But as part of your online portfolio? That could (even if unlikely) cause you some issues. I'd redo ...


2

Speaking generally, the copyright belongs to the artist unless they "give" their rights away (contractually or otherwise) or they produce the work as a "work for hire". The term "work for hire" has a very specific meaning in the US. Here's the AIGA's take on copyright ownership.


2

Follow e100's advice. Here's why: you have (or your client has) a budget, and the difference between the cost of a standard job and a custom job is substantial. The cut lines in a template are called die lines. They are your guides to where the cuts will be made. Your folder will be made from card stock which will be cut after it's printed using a cutting ...


2

Ryan, SlideRoom is a flexible system that can be used by schools in a number of ways. Since there is no single correct way to prepare a portfolio, it is critical that you read the school's instructions. These will often be posted on their main website, or on the Media step within their SlideRoom portal. As a rule of thumb, you should use individual jpgs ...


2

I'd absolutely never include anything from the adult entertainment industry in any portfolio unless I was applying for another position in the adult entertainment industry. And I don't say that because it would offend me. I say that because you never know who it will offend.


2

I wouldn't give the satisfaction of a link. Pick a few of your best pieces and put it into a well designed PDF along with your résumé. Include that as well as the separate résumé file. Be wary of resolution to memory balance, you don't want it to be too large because different companies will have different limits on their email. State in the cover letter / ...


2

I am not a designer, but I thought it was pretty good looking. Honestly I felt i am viewing a site might be its is designed for any ipad or big mobile phone not for my desktop at all. this design is boring and probably shouldn't be shown to prospect employers its is good looking coz there is nothing much,like on what basis you can decide that it's ...


2

Get / create a damn good website that effortlessly shows off your work and your diversity. Link to other places people might find you like a Behance or Dribbble profile. For digital design show any interactive or coding work you've done (link to GitHub etc); just make it easy for people to look at your work. C.V.s are made to be ignored. Seriously they are ...


2

I think it's the perspective which is inconsistent in your link, not the screenshots specifically. This seems more prevalent in the lower 3/4 screenshot. There's no attention to the existing iMac perspective, only the top edge angle. Vanishing point would certainly help this. There are many tutorials for Vanishing Point. And the entire point of the ...


2

How many is an impossible question to answer: you should have your best work there, it should represent a cross-section of the work you do or hope to do. Posters, flyers etc are of course easy, the tricky part is websites. Images only? Links to live sites, customers? I cannot stress this enough: keep your best work in your portfolio. It is better with few ...


2

Another opinion: Do what makes sense to you. The key is that your work looks as good as you can make it. Personally, I'm not a fan of the big portfolios with work mounted on matte board anymore. From a designer's perspective, they are expensive, time consuming, and a bit of a pain to lug around. From an interviewee's perspective, they are cumbersome. ...


1

Always show process. As much as you can/feel appropriate. For a portfolio to work for a design firm--they'll absolutely want to know about your process. For a portfolio for getting clients, they may not be specifically looking for your process, but in showing it, you will help communicate your broad skill sets and what you are actually providing the client ...


1

In your actual portfolio, I would suggest almost never showing the process. A portfolio itself should be about final, completed works in as simple and elegant manner as possible. What many designers and agencies have done, quite successfully, is merge the concept of a portfolio and of a case studies in one. If you have the time, and a collection of clients ...



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