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31

Another common issue is, that by posting their content on Behance in your name, their brand is on a platform they can't control. It may be difficult (even borderline Quixotic) in our age, but many organisations try hard to keep complete control of all uses of their brand. Worries can include: They might simply have unspecified concerns about a comms ...


23

As someone who looked over résumés, I would be more impressed by a résumé which was elegant and a little different but readable than something with enormous graphics, fancy fonts, or blinking text. Or glitter. Remember that the readers are going over dozens of résumés in every batch. They need to look for keywords, ...


18

Before you put yourself through the trial that is creating your own website (and it is, just in the amount of time it takes), you have to ask yourself what reason you represent yourself online. Do you really just need a portfolio for potential employers? Then worry not, because having your work on those major sites is enough for employers to get a feel for ...


15

It's not normal, but not uncommon. There can be many reasons for it. Often it is simply a strong-armed legal department that insists on NDA-type relations with all vendors. I typically leave a line in my contracts that states I reserve the right to showcase the work in my portfolio. If this raises a red flag for the client, then it's a topic we can ...


14

In these kinds of cases, I publish the design that I made. I am not always the developer of my own designs, and as you pointed out, sometimes the client is determined to have something their way, without really caring about the loss of aesthetics that goes with it. I don't think there's any harm in publishing original designs, non-approved designs, or ...


11

You are kind of comparing apples to oranges. Development is not design. A portfolio is almost always more important for a design position. Employers are interested in a designer's aesthetics, their style, their creativity. None of that can be deduced from a resume/CV. Even a designer with zero creativity or a horrible aesthetic sense can be employed. A ...


10

It's probably time to hang up a shingle and promote yourself as a freelancer, at least for the time being. Acquent is one good place to start. Make yourself a fantastic-looking business card, carry everywhere and give out freely. Although you can always poke around for pro bono work for local charitable or religious organizations, these aren't the best for ...


10

I was recently involved in helping to recruit a new designer and I was asked to design the part of the interview that would test for the right kind of practical creative thinking. "Interpret this brief" tests What I went with - which seemed to work quite well and got very useful results - was to: Give each candidate a plausible, basic design brief ...


10

You can put tutorial work in your portfolio provided you explain that it is tutorial work. Alas, I don't know if that would gain you much in an interview. The fact that you can finish a tutorial doesn't necessarily translate into design and problem solving skills which is what the person looking at your portfolio wants to see.


10

Some companies are very snobby about who does work for them and for others. And therefore may not want (with respect) a new, unknown freelancer laying claim to their (potentially big) brand. Lets say for example IBM had a new logo and brand designed, you would expect them to go to a big, expensive design house in New York. But if it became apparent that ...


9

Common sense would indicate that: if you are going for an "adult entertainment" related job, then do include such works in your portfolio and in your resume if you are going for a non-adult job, then don't include such works in your portfolio or your resume. If you regularly go for both types then by all means have two separate portfolios and resumes. ...


8

I like resumés with a bit of flair. However, you should keep in mind form vs. function. If a resumé goes too far into form and loses function it's pretty worthless. I'd suggest using the necessary items and making them graphical in nature with nice headlines, use of font faces, etc. I would never put a photo on a resumé, ever. And I'd be hesitant to use any ...


8

You should probably consider several different versions of your resume - possibly one that's very traditional / sedate and one that's a little edgier. You should be doing a little research on any company you go to work for; it should quickly become clear which resume will be appropriate (just as you should be prepping for the interview by asking "khakis or ...


8

Well there are several things you can do but I think personally a site is best viewed at its desired state, which is a site. If you own your own domain with hosting I really don't see why you couldn't sub-domain your sites (such as clientproject.emilie.com) if you are worried that the finished project to the client will be altered. Just add a basic ...


8

In your case, this CAN be two separate things. Your work for a client and work in your portfolio. Let me explain: I have tons of work that I've done for certain clients that I hate because of their feedback. I still have to deliver the product, so I sucked it up and completed according to their specifications. BUT I also save the version that I liked. This ...


8

I don't understand what you are calling "Persona". Is that like an avatar or a pet? In spanish that just mean people. But I'm posting some diagrams. When you make some creative work you have this 3 elements. As we are in the Graphic design industry the artist is "Me". In some cases a person can be 2 elements at once, for example a portrait photography ...


7

Your position is unusual but not that unusual, and you're lucky that, more than in other trades, good design recruiters are usually more interested in the quality of your portfolio and what it shows of your aesthetic sense, creativity and ability to meet a brief than they are in doing a box-ticking exercise on your resume. (but not all recruiters are good ...


7

Should designers put ALL of their works in their portfolio? My answer is NO. A portfolio is a collection of your best work. Not EVERYTHING you've done since kindergarten. However, I DO feel that a portfolio should be tailored for who you are showing it to just like a resume. If you are presenting to a client that wants you to do their website, then ...


7

I suggest that you contribute to an open source project.


6

A portfolio should sum up the work you have done and the impression you are trying to give. Generally speaking ,if you are a web designer, a portfolio fo print work would be less relevant than your web design work so you would promote your web design work over your print work. Think of it like a colourful CV/resume. You would taylor it to the job you are ...


6

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer, so I can't take responsbility, yadda yadda yadda. No. 'Changing' a work 'a bit to make it mine' is a so-called derivative work, for which the original author explicitly owns the copyright. Besides, taking someone else's work, changing it a bit, and presenting it as completely your own, wouldn't that be deception or fraud, or ...


6

Have you tried offering your services to your community? Places always in need of graphic designers include: Religious communities (churches) Community centres Amateur theatre groups Support groups (i.e. AA) Schools Immigration welcoming groups Senior communities Condominiums By the way, you can always do these things without saying explicitly "hey, I am ...


5

A portfolio is a collection of your work. It's used to demonstrate your capabilities, usually as part of a job-seeking process. It should have your best work from whatever it is you do. The rest is left as an exercise for the student.


5

How many is an impossible question to answer: you should have your best work there, it should represent a cross-section of the work you do or hope to do. Posters, flyers etc are of course easy, the tricky part is websites. Images only? Links to live sites, customers? I cannot stress this enough: keep your best work in your portfolio. It is better with few ...


5

There is really no definitive answer to this question. It's generally best to shoot for around 10 give or take one or two. But, there is no rule. While I don't really know what content you are referring to with "is it ok to borrow content from websites or other work" - it is generally unacceptable to "borrow" anything for a portfolio. The purpose of a ...


5

If your work consists of posters, brochures, business cards that were produced and used, then you should have the paper quality that the client got. Basically you should have in your portfolio some examples of stuff you have done. If you only have your work digitally, I would simply go for the best paper possible, the most expensive and/or best fitted to ...


5

Like coding, graphic design is really about creative thinking and problem solving. Also like coding, any test you could give likely emphasizes implementation skills more so than creative thinking. IMHO, these types of tests check for the understanding of particular code syntax or a particular piece of software...both skills that are easy to learn, so ...


5

Definite No. It is tough to know where to draw the line though, particularly if you have a lot of pieces that you look at as similar quality. You should ask peers what is your best work(s), but more importantly, what is/are the worst. If you get a consistent answer for that, you are hurting yourself, even if it does establish diversity/range. I think the ...


5

If this is for an interview I would suggest tailoring the best 10 pieces you have for that company and putting it in a portfolio. We do have a similar question that might also be useful to you: "What type of paper should I use for print outs for a physical portfolio?" You could always re-iterate that you have more work, if they would like to see it, on ...



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