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10

It's probably time to hang up a shingle and promote yourself as a freelancer, at least for the time being. Acquent is one good place to start. Make yourself a fantastic-looking business card, carry everywhere and give out freely. Although you can always poke around for pro bono work for local charitable or religious organizations, these aren't the best for ...


9

Common sense would indicate that: if you are going for an "adult entertainment" related job, then do include such works in your portfolio and in your resume if you are going for a non-adult job, then don't include such works in your portfolio or your resume. If you regularly go for both types then by all means have two separate portfolios and resumes. ...


9

You can put tutorial work in your portfolio provided you explain that it is tutorial work. Alas, I don't know if that would gain you much in an interview. The fact that you can finish a tutorial doesn't necessarily translate into design and problem solving skills which is what the person looking at your portfolio wants to see.


7

Your position is unusual but not that unusual, and you're lucky that, more than in other trades, good design recruiters are usually more interested in the quality of your portfolio and what it shows of your aesthetic sense, creativity and ability to meet a brief than they are in doing a box-ticking exercise on your resume. (but not all recruiters are good ...


7

Well there are several things you can do but I think personally a site is best viewed at its desired state, which is a site. If you own your own domain with hosting I really don't see why you couldn't sub-domain your sites (such as clientproject.emilie.com) if you are worried that the finished project to the client will be altered. Just add a basic ...


7

In your case, this CAN be two separate things. Your work for a client and work in your portfolio. Let me explain: I have tons of work that I've done for certain clients that I hate because of their feedback. I still have to deliver the product, so I sucked it up and completed according to their specifications. BUT I also save the version that I liked. This ...


6

I was recently involved in helping to recruit a new designer and I was asked to design the part of the interview that would test for the right kind of practical creative thinking. What I went with - which seemed to work quite well and got very useful results - was to give each candidate a plausible very basic brief (everyone gets the same one, naturally) ...


6

Should designers put ALL of their works in their portfolio? My answer is NO. A portfolio is a collection of your best work. Not EVERYTHING you've done since kindergarten. However, I DO feel that a portfolio should be tailored for who you are showing it to just like a resume. If you are presenting to a client that wants you to do their website, then ...


5

A portfolio should sum up the work you have done and the impression you are trying to give. Generally speaking ,if you are a web designer, a portfolio fo print work would be less relevant than your web design work so you would promote your web design work over your print work. Think of it like a colourful CV/resume. You would taylor it to the job you are ...


5

A portfolio is a collection of your work. It's used to demonstrate your capabilities, usually as part of a job-seeking process. It should have your best work from whatever it is you do. The rest is left as an exercise for the student.


5

Definite No. It is tough to know where to draw the line though, particularly if you have a lot of pieces that you look at as similar quality. You should ask peers what is your best work(s), but more importantly, what is/are the worst. If you get a consistent answer for that, you are hurting yourself, even if it does establish diversity/range. I think the ...


5

If your work consists of posters, brochures, business cards that were produced and used, then you should have the paper quality that the client got. Basically you should have in your portfolio some examples of stuff you have done. If you only have your work digitally, I would simply go for the best paper possible, the most expensive and/or best fitted to ...


5

Look, you're a designer just starting out, and it sounds like you've shown enough talent to be noticed by a reputable client. You're off to a good start. Let's look at your career path from a long term perspective. As a free-lance designer, you're going to start out not making very much cash, and working hard to advance to bigger and better (and higher ...


5

Disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer, so I can't take responsbility, yadda yadda yadda. No. 'Changing' a work 'a bit to make it mine' is a so-called derivative work, for which the original author explicitly owns the copyright. Besides, taking someone else's work, changing it a bit, and presenting it as completely your own, wouldn't that be deception or fraud, or ...


4

I'd absolutely never include anything from the adult entertainment industry in any portfolio unless I was applying for another position in the adult entertainment industry. And I don't say that because it would offend me. I say that because you never know who it will offend.


4

Before I decided that I wanted to go to school for graphic design, I was pretty heavily into math and science. During my junior year, I toured colleges and learned that one that I was interested in would require a portfolio for admission. So, for my senior year I ended up taking six art classes (and no science, and more of a blowoff English class) - 3 the ...


4

Like coding, graphic design is really about creative thinking and problem solving. Also like coding, any test you could give likely emphasizes implementation skills more so than creative thinking. IMHO, these types of tests check for the understanding of particular code syntax or a particular piece of software...both skills that are easy to learn, so ...


3

In my experience, a good portfolio is (almost) all you need. Experience is of course very, very valuable, but if you have been freelancing and you can showcase your work, everything else will come second. If I have to hire another designer, I don't care about their training. Now, of course, I am not a company or a studio. For them, having experience in the ...


3

I think in general the answer depends on where in your career you are. Early in your career, (good) recruiters may be even more interested in the process than the end results: your skills will improve quickly on the job, but if you don't know how to go about developing ideas, understanding client's needs and making it all work, that's much harder to learn ...


3

Here my two cents... Typically, there's some sort of agreement or contract laid out. If there is no contract, legally, I don't believe there's anything the client can say or do. I mean, there's nothing to prove anything. Often times an artist may also specify that they may use the work as part of their portfolio. Other times a client may buy exclusive ...


3

What I'd suggest is first check if there are any open positions that fit your skills, and then maybe also write cold applications (they may not be very likely to get you a job, but you never know). Write a short letter explaining why you are valuable (as usual) and add a portfolio with your best pieces. As it was said before, I also think it counts a lot ...


3

Write a really good cover letter Your prospective employer, if they're worth working for, wants to know where your passions lie and that you can communicate well. Depending on what kind of org you want to work in, show a little personality and skip the overly formal accountant-type letter. Make sure your work samples rock Once you have their interest, ...


3

There is really no definitive answer to this question. It's generally best to shoot for around 10 give or take one or two. But, there is no rule. While I don't really know what content you are referring to with "is it ok to borrow content from websites or other work" - it is generally unacceptable to "borrow" anything for a portfolio. The purpose of a ...


3

If this is for an interview I would suggest tailoring the best 10 pieces you have for that company and putting it in a portfolio. We do have a similar question that might also be useful to you: "What type of paper should I use for print outs for a physical portfolio?" You could always re-iterate that you have more work, if they would like to see it, on ...


3

I was wondering on what kind of paper should I take the print outs of my work? The kind of paper depends on what you are printing. If you are printing stationary then actually get it printed the card stock they recommend. If you are printing brochures then actually get the printer to fold it for you. Actual demos of your portfolio work gives a ...


3

Copyright is copyright. Whether you are making money off it or not is irrelevant (though, note that you ARE making money off of it as you're using it for promotional purposes). For use in an in-class project? Likely no big deal in the grand scheme of things. But as part of your online portfolio? That could (even if unlikely) cause you some issues. I'd redo ...


3

All my work on my portfolio site would be work I created at my day job. Does this look bad to a client? It won't really be a problem if the work is solid and there is enough variety to the projects/pieces. If looking for freelance web design and you only have 10 pages from the same company site to show, it won't look that favorable. ...


3

When presenting to fellow designers (for job interviews and the like) all that matters is that your designs are appropriate for the client. When presenting to clients, however, as you hint at, ideally your work reflects the type of work they are looking for. It's certainly fine/common to have many versions of your portfolio. In fact, you may want to ...


3

I see no reason why not. The entire world is not so contract-obsessed as the US, so unless you have a massively complicated contract that mentions this (and that to me would be wildly bizarre), go ahead. You should also be able to put the logos that are in use in your portfolio too. That is kinda what a portfolio is. And fictional logos? Absolutely. It is ...


3

For a recent job opening, we were looking for a web designer. A lot of resumes we were seeing were print focused, lots of Adobe experience, and maybe they took a web class a year ago. The test I created was to ask candidates to live write a simple product prototype. Header, nav bar, 25% left column with secondary nav. I didn't care what tools or frameworks ...



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