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12

I can't remember a single academic poster, from my 'scientific years', that was (at all) well designed. All I can think of are walls and walls full of text (usually in the same font), and me not reading even 10% of them. But to be honest, most teams wouldn't have the budget for (or the tradition of) hiring designers to do them. Posters usually need to ...


9

I think the only real con is your limited color space. And that isn't necessarily a huge con... Some great designers have embraced the photocopier. One that comes to mind is Art Chantry who, IMHO, is just as responsible for the Seattle Grunge scene as Nirvana was: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Chantry Granted, that's a particular aesthetic that may ...


8

That actually looks to be about a 7° angle (although it's not exactly 7°. It's like 7.1° or 7.2°). There are no hard and fast rules on angles I'm aware of. But generally, I try to stick to 5° increments. The real key to using angles which are aesthetically pleasing is to use them repeatedly in the same piece. One element at an angle will almost always ...


7

That question is hard to answer in general. I think it depends on your location and what you want do with it. I have found this link, which is about lyrics quoted in books, but I think you can transfer it to your question: Quoting Lyrics and Dodging Copyright Issues by Grant Piercy As suggestet, here are some quotes from the article: Let me make this ...


7

If you'll be going to a digital print shop to make the posters (which would be usual for a small run for a local event), you'll be fine at 150 ppi, and for a background image you probably wouldn't be in trouble at 100 ppi, particularly since it likely won't contain a lot of high-frequency detail that would conflict with your text. An 11x17 poster is mostly ...


4

The discussion on the FL&U meta shows the community strongly rejects the obvious symbols and has affinity for the antique, so if you were my client I'd probably lean in the direction of the late-19th Century lithograph look, like the one you show. There are great Lautrec lithographs that could provide inspiration, but it's that hand-drawn, quirky ...


4

Obviously you're limited by the equipment you have at your disposal, but have you considered CMYK screen printing? You will need a 4 color press with precise registration, but it is entirely possible to do: CMYK Screen Printing Consumer level wide format inkjet printers are available if you're looking to buy one, in my experience Epson is generally regarded ...


4

For printing a poster, should I go for 8 or 16-Bit mode? 16-bit color is usually overkill for most any project. Professional photographers will often use it for the flexibility it provides when editing RAW imagery, but beyond that, it's not usually something you'd need to deal with. For putting my poster on web, what should be the ppi because I ...


3

Whether or not this approach is appropriate is going to depend entirely on who your organization is. Assuming it's not a total branding miss ... I've done some very low budget black and white work (offset and digital) for commercial clients and cause-based events. You can achieve great impact if you design for the limited palette* and choose your paper ...


3

My advice is: visualize as much as possible. Posters live from being easy to digest. If people see clutters of headings, paragraphs and some images randomly thrown in they usually get lost and bored. I once was told that a person in a crowd is not willing to spend more than five minutes looking at the poster, the very first seconds decide if a closer looks ...


3

To me (a designer), a company (non-profit or otherwise) using b&w photocopies as their unique print communication comes across as on a shoestring or no budget, amateurist, college-back-room and underground, maybe even semi-legal. I can't really call this a pro or con -- If these are associations your company and your target audience and benefactors will ...


3

As others have noted, buying more RAM is rarely a bad idea when working with images, particularly very large ones. However, another way to approach the problem would be to design your poster in a vector graphics editor such as Adobe Illustrator or Inkscape. As vector graphics are scalable, they can be rendered at any size or resolution without suffering ...


3

"Most attractive" is a pretty hard question to answer, but if you want to emulate a range of styles in a movie poster, you're in luck because movie posters tend to follow a range of clichés. FontShop has a blog called the FontFeed, and they have a large archive of posts where they review movie posters. Read ten of 'em in succession and you'll start to see ...


3

iTunes has a similar feature that sums up genres nicely:


3

150 ppi is plenty of resolution if you're printing on canvas. If you expect your piece to be viewed from a few inches away (less than 16), then 300 ppi is more than sufficient. Beyond that point you're just adding to the file size without adding visible image information in the final product. On high-grade art paper, you can go as high as 600 ppi. Beyond ...


2

Corel and PhotoShop should work fine. Depending on the poster you'd likely be using a mix of vector illustration (Adobe Illustrator, InkScape, Corel Draw, etc.) and Raster image editing (PhotoShop, GIMP, etc.) and maybe some page layout software as well (QuarkXpress, InDesign, Scribus). That said, you normally wouldn't want a raster image editor to be your ...


2

Get more RAM. Seriously. I had the same problem on a machine with only 2GB of RAM and it was a wonder I ever got anything accomplished.


2

I'm not really certain what the question is... How to work with large files? You need as much RAM as a machine can hold and you can afford. 3GB is scraping the bottom anymore. Especially for large files. A 64Bit operating system and Photoshop running under 64bit helps. A separate drive (not partition) to use for scratch space will also help speeds. A ...


2

The romantic Paris most people think of is late 1800s/early 1900s, of which these posters are reflective of. Other artistic styles that can help convey “French” would be Impressionism and Art Nouveau.


2

sounds like you are making an infographic about creating posters. I'd start brainstorming about what type of posters you will be making. That is are they materials for internal use or more marketing to eventual customers. I like https://bubbl.us/ for brainstorming. Once you have your target audience that will greatly help what design style the audience ...


2

John has a great solution with Epson. Personally I run the Workforce 1100, if you watch Staples they go on sale every other year for 149.99. Last time I bought two. I also picked up BlackMax to print a plate for each CMYK. Do exactly what John's video recommends. In all I think I walked out with a couple hundred bucks in equipment. EDIT: video on ...


2

Perfect, it definitely looks Frenchy to me! (note that I'm not French :-)) P.S.: when I see that poster I almost hear Edith Piaf singing ...


2

You can extract the images with Adobe Acrobat. I don't think I've ever seen a PDF opened in Illustrator request image links. PDFs embed images by default.


2

It most certainly is a derivative work, plain and simple. Translating an artistic work from one medium to another - like a song lyric or speech to a poster - is still creating a derivative work. What you are probably meaning to ask, technically, is "it is fair use" (or "fair dealing" in some parts of the world) - does it qualify for the standard exemptions ...


2

TIFF is only the best format for poster print if you are printing a photograph or some other raster image e.g. an image straight from Photoshop. Converting to TIFF would rasterise text unnecessarily, which is bad for print quality (or at best at very high resolutions, neutral). You'd be better off either: converting to a mostly-vector PDF, using one of ...


2

File > Save As... choose JPG. Set the Quality to 12 and save. DO NOT use Save for Web, use Save As.. The difference is Save for Web will save an RGB image at low resolution. By Choosing Save As.. you can save a CMYK JPG at high resolution. The quality setting of 12 will retain most of the quality of the file. In fact, you probably won't be able to ...


2

I'd personally always use InDesign for posters, but it all depends on the type of output you're after. If you're self-printing, Photoshop might be easier to deal with, but you wouldn't be able to make on-the-fly corrections; you'd need to take screen grabs and add the images in as layers. With InDesign, you can either work with existing fonts that are ...


1

I have some experience with this since I worked for a printing company for a number of years. One thing I had to get used to was the fact that you do not need super high DPI images when printing larger format graphics. For the piece you are making you can absolutely get away with 200 dpi or even 150. If you are saving a pdf make sure you set image ...


1

When designing for large format printing it is a good idea to do as much in a vector package as possible such as InDesign or Illustrator. this will allow text and edges to stay sharp. Large format printing (generally) does not require as high a resolution as lithography as your eyes are further away from a 1m x 2m design than you would with say a magazine, ...


1

It's really impossible to answer this question without knowing the specifics of your question. But let's start by talking about 'vibrant' and what that means. I'm going to assume you mean it's a bright, highly saturated color. Your main options: Traditional 4-color printing. This is your CMYK process. There's a limit to the range of colors CMYK can make ...



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