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The one biggest difference really is: When you design in @2x you can export in @1x When you design in @1x you can't export in @2x


2

I do not understand the @2x as a "trend". It sometimes is a requirement on web design. @2x, @3x, @Nx is not a way to design everything, it is a declaration on a css stylesheet to use an image at higher resolution. It is a specific case of high resolution devices. Aka Iphone, Ipad. The resolution is higher than normal. If thoose systems declare the ...


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It's for Retina displays and higher density devices. And you need to have a higher resolution for these and since it's easier to shrink an image than resize it bigger when the files are created bigger from the start. The files that are rasterized and prepared for Retina are usually ending with the @2x.jpg for example, because the script calling them ...


4

what's the difference between a 360ppi mock vs a 72ppi mock When talking about screen mock-ups, absolutely nothing. The only thing that matters is pixel dimensions. As for your concerns, non of them are really all that much of an issue for a team of designers and developers that understand the process. Very large file sizes Hard drives are ...


0

Your printer probably meant that at this dimension (1000x98 pixels = 5.5" x 0.5" @72ppi), your artwork needs to be at least "600dpi". He wanted a 5.5" x 0.5" at 600dpi. Printers rarely use "pixels" for dimensions, they use the standard metric or imperial system as units (inch, centimeter, etc.). They often use dpi and ppi to mean the printed ...



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