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I already worked with large banners and you should not use Photoshop in this one. If you're going to manipulate photos or images, do it on Photoshop then proceed to work on your banner on Illustrator. If your banner requires a lot of text or reading I recommend InDesign. Large scale prints of photos needs higher definition but you can work between 60dpi and ...


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Echoing the first answer, I would design to scale, and in Illustrator (especially if you will be incorporating a lot of graphics). But ask the printer what their setup preferences/delivery requirements are.


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Set up your file to scale, maybe 10:1 If possible, use vector graphics and not pixels Use InDesign, or maybe illustrator. Photoshop is not a layout tool. If you must use photography, 72ppi is a good guide for large scale outdoor imagery. Good design beats resolution every time. Print out your design draft, tape it to your wall and stand back to review the ...


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Here is the dependence that answer your question. Vertical axe is the optimal image resolution and horizontal axe is the distance intended to look on the image. Red curve is for the people with myopia, green is for the people with normal vision and blue is for the hyperopia case. Practically I never used for such big format the resolution more than 72 ppi.


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A pixel is a point sample. A point sample has no size (read a pixel is not a sqare3). The pitch between samples on a digital display device unspecified. When you make a image 800 pixels wide you get a randomly large image. The technical reason is that: Images degrade on anything but 1 pixel = 1 pixel ratio. Beyond this the operating system does not even ...


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A pixel is not a fixed size. 800 pixels on one monitor will be a completely different size to 800 pixels on another monitor. There is no way around that, it's just how screens work. If you really need to see things at close to actual size (assuming you're working in physical units) you could do some calculation and view your image at the correct size, but ...



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