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t has become commonplace to refer to PPI as DPI, even though PPI refers to input resolution. Industry standard, good quality photographs usually require 300 pixels per inch, at 100% size, when printed onto coated paper stock, using a printing screen of 150 lines per inch (lpi).


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As an addendum to some of these great answers, there should be a distinction made about the term "density." In the ink/offset press world, "density" refers to ink coverage. But in the photography world (it is called PHOTOshop, after all), "density" refers to brightness -- a carry-over from film terminology. So we have three uses of the term "density" that ...


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Imagesetters and platemakers can have resolutions as high as 3,600 dpi. While there is a point of diminishing returns for linescreen (heck, my Gaebel Half-tone screen determiner only goes up to 200), there are other options, w/ the most notable one being stochastic (Frequency Modulation (FM)) screening (traditional halftone screening is Amplitude ...


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Some things said in the comments are wrong and misleading. Reason why the printer ask for lineart at 1200dpi (AND bitmap mode) is because it has almost the same quality as a vector once printed. It needs to be in bitmap 1bit. If your printer asks for it, he's totally right. If you manage the black text the same way as the CMY, you'll end up with "hairy ...


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Other answers have more than adequately explained resolution, so I'll explain density, which has a VERY different meaning in the graphic design world. Ink density is the total area coverage of paper by the printed ink dots, from 0-400% (100% each for CMYK), and this is important because depending on the printing process, only 250-350% is available for use, ...


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Many image formats contain the chosen ppi value as an advice to other applications. For instance, when placing an image in indesign, it will be of the size specified in photoshop. Even if the pixel count is exactly the same, it will be different sizes. Using highres images in indesign is cumbersome with the wrong ppi set. This is an image in PS. As you can ...


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Possibly related: is it mandatory to keep 72 dpi for web design? What if I create in 200dpi? Resolution was the universal term for print production before the web really existed. History dictates it be called resolution. And resolution is the correct term when discussing image quality for print output. Density only refers to on-screen and has no bearing ...


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The PPI doesn't really matter if you use pixels as units; 1000x1000 pixels at 300 or 72ppi will still be 1000x1000 pixels. But when you change the units to inches, then you'll notice one is smaller than the other; there will be be more pixels per inch as the name says. As you mentioned, PPI is more for printing, but it can also now be used as a reference for ...



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