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11

No, you aren't missing something. There is no point at all in converting images to CMYK, and several good reasons NOT to. Converting images to flattened CMYK tiff is an old QuarkXpress workflow that is a complete waste of time today, especially with InDesign. What is a good idea is to size images in Photoshop before final output, to reduce file size and for ...


10

It's a DuPont proprietary colour proofing process. It was originally a photographic process. They now have a digital version -- basically a colour-calibrated high-res inkjet print. I haven't actually heard the term used in the fully digital (computer to plate) era though. Maybe there are just a lot more options from competitors these days. Anyway, it's ...


5

Ask your printer as Scott mentions what size the barcode needs to be. If its a purely graphical scanner system then you should be able to make it whatever color you want and fairly small. Can you use invisible ink? No you cannot use invisible ink. Barcodes are an optical system. Most have now gone "cheap" using basically 2D image processing to scan the ...


4

This seems to work: Install the open source indesign alternative Scribus, Mac and Windows (there's also an official portable version for Windows on sourceforge that doesn't require installation). WARNING: its interface is very confusing... But, it's free and does this particular job, there's only one simple thing we need to use it for. Open it up, go to ...


3

First you need to prepare your file to the necessary size and evaluate the effective dpi. Then you can take one fragment (A4 or Letterhead size) and print that on the equipment you will be using as a test. I don't see any other way to understand how it will look when printed.


3

How should I communicate to the designer that I need their native files for prepress purposes ONLY? Is that even acceptable? We have missed deadlines in the past for our clients because their designer cannot make the needed changes in time, or does it incorrectly, or not at all. I do not know many designers who will hand off their native files ...


3

I can't speak for everyone, but I generally have no issue providing files for press. I do not provide native files to clients for free. Perhaps the issue is the client is your middle-man. Any client asking for files is met with a pretty standard "they aren't free, see the contract" response. Any press house asking for files is treated differently. If you ...


2

Is it possible to print duotone gradient images using two pantone neon colors? Yes. What should I be aware of and be careful with when preparing the image? You should be aware that there's no way to reproduce the exact colors short of printing it. So you'll want to set up your file, but be on site for the press check to ensure it's what you're ...


2

You are ahead of the curve here. There is a lot of confusion about when a designer should change color modes. It is simple: Never (or as late as possible) is the best choice. Printers who want it done for them are working in bad-faith. To put it bluntly, those who advise "view the art in the same mode in which it will be printed" are wrong for at least two ...


2

Great question by the way. First off we're fortunate to live in an age where a properly built PDF will get you perfect prints (or near perfect) most of the time with most printers. Meaning the tools and processes are getting to a point where the designer typically does not need to worry (much) about the finer details of print production. So that out of the ...


2

I've seen the short answer to this from multiple sources as the following tables (in microns): Detail rendering equivalency: FM 20 = 500 lpi FM 25 = 325 lpi FM 35 = 325 lpi FM 36 = 275 lpi However the answer to your question is probably much more complex since there's other factors including paper and the consensus that stochastic printing generally ...


2

This is a very nice question ... and guess what!? there is an invisible ink !! and it could be done in various ways. The First method is selecting some color combinations. If you couldn't change the design at least you could select some other color combinations to dissolve the barcode between your design. The following example are scannable. The best ...


1

Hsawires gave an excelent explanation about colors. I'm adding my 2 cents. You can play with the size and proportion of the barcode. There are some limits on the offical guidelines of barcodes. But In my opinion are very square. You can reduce the size of the barcode lets say 75% and reduce the height of the bars in 50%-70%. and can be read by a linear ...


1

If you cannot get to under 100mb even after using all the possible "print" compression features from InDesign (which is the software I assumed you're using, if not please specify), I would look for another print shop. Obviously their requirements would force you to produce a low-quality product, it might be ok for them to force their customers to do so, ...


1

Forms folds and Sizes by Poppy Evans is an excellent book and it's relatively inexpensive. I read it back to back and I also come back to it whenever I need something specific. A bit about what the book chapters: Copyright and proofreading Color and Imaging Type Paper Grid design Binding and folds Envelopes and folders Packaging Postar standars, Bar code ...


1

The normal way to acheive "full bleed" on A3 for example is to print on bigger paper such as A£+ or SRA3 & trim the white space off? Most decent laser printers and copiers will take these sizes, I sell Xerox kit and know that they do. I hope this helps? Regards Mike


1

Yes, CMYK results in a larger image size (it is one more channel for the file to contain), but it makes perfect sense to view the art in the same mode in which it will be printed. Adobe applications have the special "Print Preview" setting for documents for a reason. You need to speak with your printer about this. A lot of printers require CMYK to pass ...


1

There are a couple of scenarios to consider here, but the one immutable rule I have always gone by is that scanning 1200 dpi is sufficient for anything to be printed. That being said, there are a number of caveats... If the line art is straight black and white, no tints or colors, then scan the art as a 1200 dpi bitmap, meaning an indexed color palette of ...



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