Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

The combination of "bright", "easily distinguishable" and "20 and more" is tricky. Reminds me of "Our work is fast, cheap and high-quality. Pick any two." I think you could drop "bright" out of the mix and just say "contrasted". That makes the brief simpler to achieve, and I think will get you where you want to be. I don't know of such a set off-hand, but ...


11

Thanks to great work P. Green-Armytage (2010): A Colour Alphabet and the Limits of Colour Coding. // Colour: Design & Creativity (5) (2010): 10, 1-23 (and to user ohadsc who referenced it!) now I know at least 3 ready-made color sets of maximum contrast containing not less than 20 colors (but I still have explicit RBG values only for one of them): ...


9

If you want a quick and easy solution, I recommend searching for PSD mock-up templates. There are a lot of options available on Pixeden, here is a free one available: Psd Business Card Mock-Up Vol 1 I made this in Photoshop using that template: Here is one that is available for purchase that is a little closer to the one you linked: Psd Business Card ...


6

Off-hand I'm thinking knots. (image from http://www.math.buffalo.edu/) Knots offer a wide array of complexity degrees. From the simple square knot to some very complex, multi-line, knots. And the multi-line knots could be used to show integration between different languages if needed. These could be used or integrated into a design to show the complexity ...


6

Both PowerPoint and Impress slides are specified in inches or cm, rather than pixels, and these real-world units are somewhat arbitrary given that the presentations are normally scaled proportionally to fit whatever screen they're shown on. (Or non-proportionally, if somewhat's got the screen settings wrong) I'd go with an image that's big enough in pixels ...


5

As a non-native English speaker, I wouldn't be offended at all. Typically for written forms that are drastically different(e.g. English vs Japanese) I don't think there's a need to put them in different colors. The whole point of using different colors is to easily identify the difference. I remember when I first studied English, when my teacher listed ...


4

Good presenters are fun to listen to, with any slides being used being the 'extra' bits of spice to make it all interesting. Poor presenters read their slides verbatim which is a) boring, as people can typically read the slides faster than the presenter can read them and b) pointless, since you can just read the slides...no need for the presenter being ...


4

I'm guessing people in general appreciate clean and easy access to information. My personal experience is that I've always spent some time designing my presentations (I used to be a researcher), and I always received really good feedback for them being "different" and pleasing to the eye. Also, some of the best seminars I remember used great infographics. ...


3

It may depend on what do you mean by complexity. If your code has a lot of nesting constructs and loops, perhaps you can first properly indent the code, and then replace the actual lines of code by rectangles, as to visualize the indentation and nesting. Some especially interesting parts could be done in another color, and made into active links, so you ...


3

Please don't take offense to this, but when a coder is proud of the complexity of his/her code (like your sentence says "wow this code is sooo complex"), most of the time it is a sign of a really bad design. I say this because it's what I have experienced in my 14 years of professional programming. It's easy to write code that is complex and more difficult ...


3

There's a fundamental flaw and that's attempting to plot 20 different things in one visual. That's a lot of visual clutter and adding 20 colors is only going to add to that clutter. I'd consider rethinking the overall visual if you can. Perhaps segment it into 4 visuals of 5 colors each, mix and match overlays, etc. Tufte is the go-to resource for learning ...


3

How about an illustration of a factory, with on one side: materials going in a little pile of coins going out and on the other side: product going out a great big pile of coins coming in


2

I create Powerpoint templates regularly for clients. I use RGB / 1504px x 1129px or 20.889" x 15.681" / 72ppi jpg or png files for full page backgrounds in PowerPoint. This image size will cover the entire slide. Any thing smaller will need to be scaled to match the slide dimension.


2

If you are familiar with HTMl markup consider using reveal.js. It's an slideshow/presentation in the browser. http://lab.hakim.se/reveal-js/


2

To only include necessary information is a great start. Now, because you were only asked for a template, you have to bear in mind that people will autonomously insert and delete stuff and make it look... well, different from the original one. A light background will help any text or images look better (any strong color can be problematic to combine), and ...


2

Follow e100's advice. Here's why: you have (or your client has) a budget, and the difference between the cost of a standard job and a custom job is substantial. The cut lines in a template are called die lines. They are your guides to where the cuts will be made. Your folder will be made from card stock which will be cut after it's printed using a cutting ...


2

I've found similar problems which I have been unable to resolve, and so have gone back to drawing organisation charts using plain old text boxes and connectors ("lines following the boxes when you move them" - usually Elbow or Elbow Arrow connectors) Also, often I want to highlight a single box by filling it with a different colour from the others, which I ...


2

One thing that comes to mind for me is the way certain IDE's display code. Using colors and lines to connect matching sets of begin...end, if...then, and loops makes reading code easier for programmers, so why not for non-programmers? You could show nested loops, case statements, and compound if..else sets in a neat and clean way. In the same vein, but ...


2

There are couple of options in Photoshop: Fake 3D - you can use the perspective grid to distort the faces of the box to look 3D Real 3D - Photoshop supports 3D formats such as .obj/.3ds/.dae/etc. You can use a free 3D package tool like Blender to create a box (with the dimensions you need), unwrap/map a texture, then export and render/setup in Photoshop. ...


2

One option I found is jPdf Tweak, an open-source program with rather unfriendly GUI and limited page-transition options. Does the job, however. http://jpdftweak.sourceforge.net/


2

This would depend on how the presentation is being navigated and who is controlling it. From a visual perspective on a projector navigation may serve no purpose if you're the one controlling it. A presentation slide show should only focus on what the current view point is targeting and adding a navigation would results in people always looking at it.. ...


2

Avoid convention when it comes to slides. Lynda.com has a great presentation training for this. Think Steve Jobs, one word on a slide. The slides shouldn't be the bulk of the information, it should be the centering for the topic. If you wanted to report your company had a $5B sales increase you shouldn't do it like this: Sales in 2014: ^$5,000,000,000 Most ...


1

The way I see it you have three choices. Do a presentation template using: Photoshop/Illustrator 3D Software Photography That's actually not so hard to do if you have some Photoshop/Illustrator or 3D Modeling/Rendering technical skills or if you have a good camera go analogical ... and then edit the images in order to place you content on them. My ...


1

I'd say both 16:9 and 4:3 ratios are equally pleasing, but they do depend on the screen you will be using and the information you will be showing. 4:3 is the resolution of most laptops and computers, and 16:9 is the standard aspect ratio of Blu-ray discs and HDTV signals. You can watch 4:3 content on a 16:9 display, however, you will see black bars on the ...


1

As DA01 pointed out black, white and red are the historical model of choice. I prefer a sturdy orange and some nice greys where subtly is needed.


1

These are simply multiple images combined in a raster editing application such as Photoshop. You simply place an image of your web site or app, or whatever on a layer above a photo of the computer, then save the entire thing as one, single image. (Screenshot of Photoshop CS5.1 with layers Panel) There's no super-secret dynamic web code which does this. ...


1

I have to agree with lawndartcatcher. There's not going to be a good way of doing this without a good amount of custom animation. They quick 2 minutes job is to create copies of your node and scale them up, then have them zoom into the slide one after the other until it takes up however much of the slide you want, and then to transition to your next slide. ...


1

Best advice I can give you: Keep it simple. If your target market is designers, you absolutely do not want to give them the idea that you're a) trying to compete with them, or b) have delusions of grandeur about your design skills. This works in your favor, actually, since it means you don't have to jump through more than the required minimum of hoops. :-) ...


1

A nice approach is the Solarized color scheme by Ethan Schoonover. From the descr.: "Solarized is a sixteen color palette (eight monotones, eight accent colors) designed for use with terminal and gui applications." I think it's not only a nice color scheme, but also extensible and has a nice theory behind it.


1

Wearing my hazmat suit today, so I'll give this one a shot. ;-) I don't know of any such templates, but you may find something worthwhile on the MS Office website. Your best best, I'd say, would be to: Set up a temporary background on the master slide with your grid indicated in light gray or blue. You could do this with a transparent png, I expect, over ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible