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That depends on what you're presenting. If you're presenting the low level animation and experience, then you have to do it in the medium of the final product. Anything else is either a poor approximation or unimplementable. You would never present how a paper will fold or how its texture felt on hand or its subtle scent on a screen, why would you try to ...


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I often use html/css and javascript to display complex interactions but if the change is simple then I show the different states in layer comps (and use an over-sized cursor icon) to display the different states. Original state Show mouse icon and an annotation if necessary Show state change ...


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I once attended a logo unveiling for a huge client, presented by a somewhat famous 'human interface designer' or some self-styled title. He had designed a number of things in various forms (though not logos), and considered himself a rockstar (don't most Creative Directors though?) I always considered him a bit of a tool, and as we were kind of competitors, ...


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In context By that, a logo is rarely sitting all by itself. It's usually part of a bigger presentation--be it on a web page, business card, side of a truck, etc. So, I try and show the logo as it would be used. As to what that specifically is, it all depends on the client. Some clients will get an emailed PDF of a mocked up business card. Some clients may ...


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I prefer to build the interactions and present them in the browser. Prior to being able to show them that, we typically annotate interactions but don't try to replicate them outside of web code. When you try to replicate interactions outside of web code (After effects, Animated GIF, Axure, etc) you risk designing around that particular piece of software ...


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There are different applications out there for doing just this. There are some good ones that are free but they are limited in some cases to the functionality that you can demonstrate to your client. Invision is awesome and free but has more functionality for mobile devices than it does for desktop devices. It allows you to send a link to the client and ...


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The process could involve 3 or 4 mini presentations working up to the final. In illustrative design you would roughly follow these steps. Present your sketches (can be rough pencil on paper) with the client you'd pick out the ones to push forward. Ideally both of you would have good reasons for picking them "it suits the business because of X an Y". ...


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You're asking a very broad question but I will try to help you in the best way possible. Creating a logo for a business card? Design business card with client information Buy card stock typically 100lb. Run said card stock through printer Set reg. marks and print the business card (print more than one in case there is a print issue or you mess up ...


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I like presenting logos in an environment. It's easier for the client to visualize how the logo would work with various mediums. It also doesn't hurt to provide a brief guide along with it breaking down your thought-process at least with minimal explanation. I do like it when the clients discover things about their logo they like or hadn't realized without ...


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Your question is why I suggest coding in the browser (reference: What are the steps in designing a website?). The best way to display interactivity in a site, app, or anything is the medium it is to be used in. I'm not saying completely develop the site and deliver it. What I am saying is you can deliver stages in the design/development process: Simple ...


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for me I would present the logo as a story. from the concept to my old tries and the final version. and I would present the final one in many version. ex. when it presented as B&W and full color with (color pantone), when i converted to a 3D model and revolve over the screen, and I would choose some media like stationary, t-shirt, over a building ...etc ...


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There seems to be recent trend towards creating animated GIFs of UI interactions (a quick search on Dribbble will reveal more). I imagine a lot of those are put together using After Effects. InVision recently posted an article outlining how they do this inhouse. While I can understand the appeal of these kinds of deliverables (they're en-vougue, they look ...


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This really depends on your workflow. Keep in mind that lots of web designers these days forego the use of any graphic software and design directly in their browser. That way, you present your designs in a browser, where they will end up. Clear an concise. If you do use static mockups in any part of your workflow, you could always create a small dynamic ...


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If your presentation is a printed material, personally I draw a wireframe or the end design proposal and annotate it with comments and explanations. and I do present all possible interaction like so - for example. if you have a pulldown menu or a mega menu in the top navigation bar for example, I render a file having the nav bar with one opened menu item. ...


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There are some great online tools that you can make presentations on. The big advantage is that they are responsive across multiple platforms, so users can view the slides from the phone, tablet, or computer. Some I've come across that don't use Flash (like Prezi does) include Slides.com - My personal favorite of this list because of it's navigation ...



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