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To my knowledge, these things are often done manually, and a double face tape "gun" will be used to apply the glue. So it's not always glue but a tape that is used. The glue usually goes on the smaller flaps because it's easier to measure its length and ensure it won't be visible at all. Most printers prefer that flap to be at least 5/8" (0.625") since the ...


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When we had typography course and would design layout for a magazine, our teacher encouraged us to first take the content, analyse it, build an approximate grid that would suit the content best (only margins and columns, not baseline grid). Then try out different sizes that would work for the grid and give maximum legibility. If you work with printed ...


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Unfortunately it has been my experience that most printers will print in full color if there is any color on the print job. To avoid this you would need to print in black and white or grayscale. Extended life: Try printing in draft mode. This will give a quick print and will use considerably less ink. It will also result in a lower quality print. Possible ...


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There is something "fishy" here. The proportions to neutralize a gray is not putting less yellow. For example. A Swop profile transforming a pure RGB black to CMYK gives this: 75 68 67 90. Let us forget the K. The magenta and yellow almost the same proportion (redish) and some more Cyan to neutralize that redish tone. So yeap. There is a chance thoose ...


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This is a feature built into Photoshop. Use the File > Print dialogue box and then move down to Printing Marks to place them on the print. Alternatively — and I know you're going to hate this — use Illustrator or InDesign, which are more purpose-built for printed documents whereas Photoshop is intended for image creation and editing.


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Crop marks will look like below. I cannot see any crop marks in the sample image you provided. The white rectangle is there to show the area I want to retain, the finished page size so to speak.


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A blending mode is just a visual screen effect. To have something not totally opaque, you will need to talk to your printer about what the substrate that is going to be printed on, they will also advise you on how colours may look if they are not opaque. Also remember if the transparent bits have a dark or light background, this will effect how the colours ...


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We need Line and Screen Black separation likely refers to them wanting a separate black plate for solid black vs. halftoned black (all the grays). This means you'll need to create two separate spot colors in the file (black 1, black 2) key line the knock out type Keylining refers to adding "trim" around areas of abutted colors to hide ...


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There are no specific standards, just general rules of thumb, and they will vary wildly based on specifics. I'd say all of the ones you list are pretty much in the ballpark. The only one I think that is off is the first one...600ppi seems overkill for even the best photo printers.


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Well, with the info we have here we can only give you some general guidelines. For the dimensions part, depends on the size of the poster, do you want it A3, that is 297mm by 420mm, resolution is safe to have it at 300 pixel/inch. This will give you a document of exactly 3508 x 4961 pixels. Anything other than that, is just as you called it, a guessing ...


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Resolution or dimensions? For "resolution" ask what machine they are working with and google the specs. In real life print an image, either you like it or you do not. For sizes, again, go to your local store or call them and ask. The "guessing games" is probably your game. You need to ble clear on what information you need to know. One thing is a color ...


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You're partly answering your own question! As you know, being a graphic designer requires you to learn specific software, get prepress (printing) technical knowledge and also learn how to handle different types of files (and so many issues too long to enumerate.) If you want to do print layouts for cards you'll need to use design software that will give ...


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The type of file they need is dependent on its usage. If the logo was generated in Illustrator, then your best bet is to export a .EPS file. Most software will allow the importing of an EPS file. EPS is vector by nature, just like AI files, so it will print sharp regardless of how big or small - unless the software they use to import the file, rasterizes ...


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There is nothing wrong with jpg, it is not the format that is wrong: if the one you gave them were "too small", you can scale up the logo in Illustrator or check your settings when you create the jpg. Jpg and png are both perfectly good file formats, unless they ask for anything specific either should do fine.


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With digital printers, calibration and the maintenance are very important. Digital printers as any other printers can also use Curves that adjust the colors. There's also settings to change a k100 to a predetermined rich black or overprint setting. Finally, temperature of the room where the printer is, temperature of the printer itself, the stock used and ...


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Based on my own experience, very few digital printing local shops know their machines when it comes down to proper color handling, color profiling, etc. Have you given them a proper CMYK file, with CMYK colors, with the CMYK profile they use? The problem you describe sounds to me like they're performing some color conversion from CMYK to RGB and back. Many ...



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