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Do a mock up... Construct the box! The size is quite small so you are fine. There are some copy stores where you can print a Tabloid size paper. Try to use the thickest paper possible. You can also print on adhesive paper and paste into a thicker paper, but the print could crack on the folds. A comment. I am scared by the idea that designers do not use ...


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Ok, just found an answer to my own question, from my printer: "Generally speaking about 25 sheets (50pp) is recommended but we have done as little as 15 sheets (30pp) and because it is PUR it stays together. Anything less should be saddle stitched." This is referring to around 100-120gsm stock.


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It can be printed on UV Flatbed Printer. If you can find near you who deals in billboards, signage etc. Nowadays, most of them have UV flatbed Printers which are used to print on metals, sun-board, ply board, glass, acrylic etc. Youtube link for a demo


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I second the @joojaa's answer and would like to add that trying to match colors across different devices is really only feasible in a color calibrated workflow. I see a lot of small print shops that don't use a color calibrated workflow. Bottom line, in my experience (10 years in the industry), is: if color matching is important, use a color calibrated ...


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All devices produce different colors with same values of CMYK! A cmyk value of x does not guarantee same color. So if you need the same color across devices then you need to have a fresh color profile associated with your device and the device needs to be calibrated. Only then will you know what the color is and can even attempt to come as close as ...


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The optimum way to do what you're seeking is to create the book in InDesign, as you mentioned, but... 1) The text should all be done in InDesign, not Illustrator or Photoshop. Your file size will be much smaller, you'll have a much easier time editing the text, and your printed product will be better. Illustrator and PS are hugely powerful, but page layout ...


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There are a couple of things to address here, the most important being the initial quality of your images. If you say yourself that the images are of low-quality, that should be an indication in itself that you need to source some higher quality images. Just because the images look decent on screen (72 PPI), does not mean they will look good in print (300 ...


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You usually only really need to worry about CMYK if you are preparing your files on a commercial print press (with few exceptions) . Most office printers are designed to work with RGB, Also some photo prints have more than 4 inks, giving them a wider color gamut than CMYK. So if you convert your file to CMYK before you send it to a photo printer with more ...


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You simply can not prepare an exact two dimensional file for a Sphere. This has being the problem for making acurate maps of the earth and visual apealing at the same time. Here is a recopilation of diferent maps trying "to solve" the problem: http://www.otake.com.mx/Apuntes/Imagen/EnviromentMaps/Maps.html What you can do is a projection. What type of ...


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If you need to manually and visually calibrate your transfer curve you can use a trick gamma calibration trick. For visual calibration: Print several different tones next to a 50% line pattern then view the patterns at distance and choose the one that best visually matches your swatch. You can repeat this for 25% and 75% then you can make a curve transfer ...


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Most regular office or home inkjet printers expect RGB files. If you send them a CMYK file, they will convert it to RGB then back to whatever internal flavour of CMYK they use for printing. This of course all depends on the printer drivers, settings, color profiles used, specific printer etc. If you know for certain that these files are going to printed ...


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A 0.25 or 0.54 difference in one ink in a process mix shouldn't make a difference, but if I were you I'd just round the values up/down. So you'll have C71 M13 Y0 K0. As for the print result, there are a number of things you want to consider: Does the new printer do the same type of printing? You might find that the old printer was using a HP Indigo ...


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As all printing issues. a) The first step is to calibrate your monitor. b) Use the apropiate color prifile. Do not use other that is not suitable for the type of paper or system. When actually printing these can quickly look overly dark and muddy. Here are two different issues here. Dark: Correct it with curves. Muddy: Correct them with saturation ...


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First of all. Some definitions, here is a similar question with a small explanation on diferent options. It is not carved in stone, but it could help you with some terminology. http://photo.stackexchange.com/questions/75865/which-print-medium-has-the-highest-dynamic-range/76016#76016 In your specific case. 1) You should not convert a picture from RGB to ...


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Given that no two office printers will be calibrated to each other, it really doesn't matter.


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Because this type of color printing (low cost, letterpress, almost always black plus one or maybe two other inks) was really only capable of printing spots of color -- distinct regions. The term Spot color contrasts with reproduction of continuous tone images (photographs) or multicolor images (like comics) the require CMYK (process or 4-color) printing.


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The cheapest is to print in a self adhesive paper. You can either buy a sheet on a copy center, or print the design there, and just cutting it. Obviously you will not see any metalic finish on the image. There are some other materials, like adhesive vinyl and there is one transparent called mylar, that is used for stickers but I am not sure if it can be ...


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Despite about 4 sets of proof readers and the client signing off I once managed to have two 21st's on a notes section of a calendar... which wasn't noticed until every one of the 12 A3 pages where printed (it appeared on each page of the calendar) and hand collated ready to be spiral bound... I was physically sick when I realised that about 6 pallet loads of ...



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