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23

If the client was given opportunity to proof read final files before they went to press, it's the client's responsibility. If you failed to allow the client to proof read before anything went to press, it's your responsibility. Clients should always have the final say before anything is reproduced. That means the client should proofread all files once ...


11

I'm not sure an invoice is the right place to create an experience. Sure, brand it, make it unique, but remember what its primary function is: to tell the client how, when, and how much to pay you. Keep in mind the client might need to scan it, copy it, print it himself. So, to give more specific advice: Turquoise is cool, but keep it to an accent color ...


9

Most commercial printers will provide a color proof that is ostensibly a very good representation of the final output. Probably will have an additional cost attached to it, but definitely ask about it. If they decline to offer a proof before final printing, you may want to look around elsewhere for another printer. Also, make sure your image is in CMYK ...


6

Asigning a spot color on a document has the purpose that anyone in a system can identify and apply a specific color on your printed project. But if you have control on this process and you know what are you doing you can brake some rules. For example, In my opinion the formula guide lacks of a pretty red. The closest to a c0m100Y100k0 red are warm red and ...


5

No, you're right, adjusting the turquoise to black simply changes which cartridge runs out quickly, and the difference in cost still wouldn't be great enough to persuade anyone to print the invoice. Reversing the colours of the front and back pages (assuming you need them at all) might. Leaving out anything that isn't actually required for the invoice, like, ...


5

My opinion in this case is that the designer is not responsible, since it was client-supplied text, and moreover, the client proofed and approved the final file for print. That said, many cases like this hinge on a couple things: 1) The designer/client agreement beforehand regarding this type of thing (if there was one). If it was explicitly stated that ...


5

When the client is the knowledge expert, the client must be responsible for the accuracy of that content assuming the client had the opportunity to review the material. I authored a technical manual and hired two editors. One of them knew nothing of the content. Her job was strictly clarity, continuity and grammatical accuracy. With the second editor, ...


4

In commercial printing, the important factor is Ink Limits. In many cases, no part of a print piece can surpass 300% ink limits. What that means is you add up the % of each ink to determine the total coverage. This is just a sample to show the theory since what you posted is an RGB image and all I can do is convert it to CMYK here (Based on my color ...


4

Pantone books show the colors of ink Pantone sells. You can't just "make up" a color and designate it as a Pantone color. If you can't find the color in any Pantone Books, Pantone doesn't make that color of ink. You can designate any color as a spot color within applications, however the point of systems like the Pantone system is that everyone sees the ...


3

Don't trust on-screen representations of CMYK. Like, ever. Even the most sophisticated .pdf viewers are bad at representing CMYK colours on an RGB screen. If you have created a proper .pdf with a proper colour profile, colours should be ok. The only ways you're ever going to be sure of how it's going to look when printed is either calibrating your monitor ...


3

Make sure when you select the gray Color not to include any colors in it .. let it black only .. it must not appear in other colors channels. this will ensure the gay will be pure gray. they gray you must use is something like that Cyan:0% Magenta:0% Yellow:0% Black:50% for example


3

Printed medium works differently form screens. Screens have 3 color elements very close to each other. Each element is capable of different color intensities. Printers on the other hand produce dots of limited number of colors usually 4 colors, but can be more and have 3-4 mid tones or so. To show mid tones it has to spread the dots around. The end result is ...


3

You are missing three things from your contract: 1) A down payment. When writing up a contract, you get a percentage of money before you do any work, to cover exactly this scenario (that you do everything and the client hates it and refuses to pay). 2) A kill fee, which is an amount (flat or percentage) which is paid when one side or the other cancels the ...


2

I don't have facts to back up my claims but I think part of it has to do with placing text in an area for legibility reasons. You will usually find text graphics in 2 main locations. The back of the windshield and the front driver & passenger doors. The back windshield being the prime location for any graphic. I believe the the second best location would ...


2

Export your file from InDesign as single pages. Then in Acrobat under File > Properties > Initial Display, set that to display as two-up with cover. Save if you want this to be the default PDF view. Close and reopen the PDF after setting the Initial View or in the View menu, choose Page Display > Two Page view to adjust the current open PDF This ...


2

In general for all print pieces . . . Bleeds should be a minimum of .125" and you want a minimum of .125" margin inside the trim area as a safe zone. I, personally, use .25" (1p6 picas) for both most of the time.


2

PDF format is the most versatile and flexible format. It can be used for both high-end printing (litho) low resolution web use and in between depending on the settings. In illustrator save dialogue boxes you can set the image compression. I would suggest no higher than 300dpi. You can also set the compression level (generally use "high" but not "very high" ...


2

Computers and paper are simply two different media having different requirements. The other answers suggest making the print version rule fully over the computer version. An alternative however is using a dynamic medium that can easily adapt based on its environment: The web. Using print stylesheets it's incredibly easy to have your beautiful layout for ...


2

This is a very nice question ... and guess what!? there is an invisible ink !! and it could be done in various ways. The First method is selecting some color combinations. If you couldn't change the design at least you could select some other color combinations to dissolve the barcode between your design. The following example are scannable. The best ...


2

ON *nix systems there is a command called psbook (see instructions here) and psnup so you can probably find it for osX. For windows you can get it with cygwin. what you would do is call: psbook -s16 print.ps out.ps psnup -la4 -2 out.ps > out2up.ps This will make pages with 16 page long signatures or 4 paper groups. You can change this by editing the -s ...


2

This is known as the 'dreaded white-box' problem. It was fairly common about 10 years ago (less so now) and has to do with transparency issues when the artwork is flattened. Adobe have a fairly comprehensive trouble-shooting page about it here: https://helpx.adobe.com/creative-suite/kb/white-box-or-color-wash.html


2

The text in one and two are debossed (or stamped), the gold text is embossed. All three also use foil. Foil is not required and the effect can be quite elegant without it. You will need to have a die made. Embossing usually involves stamping from the back of the paper and is quite visible from behind. To hide the back, you can laminate a second sheet (or ...


2

OK, I left so many comments in here that I thought I better provide my own answer. The "300dpi" rule-of-thumb comes from the world of offset printing. 4 color offset printing uses something called a line screen to create a halftone pattern of evenly spaced, but different sized dots. Offset printing can typically print up to 2400 dpi or even much higher. ...


1

You can print at higher than 300 DPI. Usually people will suggest you print at 300 DPI but that doesn't mean you have to. Printer resolution is expressed in DPI. 9600 X 2400 DPI is the printer resolution. The first term (9600) is very important when looking at resolution, whereas the second number (2400) is critical for highest quality as it refers ...


1

Vincent is correct, you can't really get a correct representation of CMYK (subtractive color process) on an RGB screen (additive color process), especially with certain colors like green. That said, most quality commercial printers will/should provide a printed color proof of some sort before printing the whole run. Definitely check with your printer (or ...


1

Hsawires gave an excelent explanation about colors. I'm adding my 2 cents. You can play with the size and proportion of the barcode. There are some limits on the offical guidelines of barcodes. But In my opinion are very square. You can reduce the size of the barcode lets say 75% and reduce the height of the bars in 50%-70%. and can be read by a linear ...


1

You can print any spot color you want. Not all spot colors have names, as you've discovered. In your files, a spot color simply tells the printer that "this is another color that we need to make a separate plate for". What ink goes on that plate can be anything. So if you have a custom color in mind, find a sample of it, take it to the printer, and they ...


1

"Best" isn't really a definitive term. And "lowest file size" is often in direct competition to quality. If you want optimum quality printing to an inkjet machine, send RGB data at 300ppi or better. File size (kb) should not be a factor you worry about. Depending upon what you are outputting from there may be other considerations. For example if you intend ...


1

In simple terms, the person that is responsible for the typos is the person that signed off on the proofs. In your deleted answer, you mention that you might try a fix such as blanco. This is actually something that is done quite often. If it's just one or two typos, you may be able to get by with having stickers printed that can cover the typo. The cost ...


1

Check your PDF save settings to ensure it is saving at 100% scale, and that the document bleed is not being included. Might be worth checking print settings to to ensure no bordering is being added, or that it is set too.



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