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30

Not only you need bleed, but you need to consider if you need to shift the image a bit away from the borders depending on the binding method you are using. Saddle stitching binding allows the book to lay flat when it is open. The content that is close to the inside edge of the book will be visible. This method of binding is usually expensive. Perfect ...


18

I will start by saying I have negative social skills with a seasoning of Aspie on them. So, taking that into account, here I go. Based on my Spock-like field work I have learnt that my non-creative clients (I have creative clients as well) tend to be problem solving oriented. They tend to focus on the problems they have and are very interested on how you ...


15

For me, it's always the why. I've run into many situations where a client is initially uneasy about my work. Not because they outright dislike it, but because they don't think it fits with "what they've seen." When clients are accustomed to seeing the same thing over and over from themselves as well as any competitors, it can be a challenge to get them to ...


12

The purpose of bleed is to mitigate imprecision. The printer "may cut 1/16 inch off the pages" means that the printer will not guarantee that their cutter will be accurate within 1/16 plus or minus (a 1/8 inch range). So the question for you is not about cutting too much off, but whether you will be happy with a sliver of white paper showing when they don't ...


11

I would contend that this is difficult to answer definitively. If you're talking a four-color process, a straight 100% 'Y' would probably be your best bet. However, highlighters tend to have a neon glow about them, which can't be achieved in CMYK. You'd need a special process color for that. Get your hands on the highlighter you want to emulate, draw on ...


9

To add on to Brendan's answer, the "Neon" quality of "Neon Yellow" can be achieved in CMYK, but that's not all a highlighter is. A physical highlighter doesn't contain the pure yellow we expect from printers and monitors, but a slightly more watered-down version, so step one would be to use, say, 75%-80% yellow to start with. Next, to achieve that ...


7

The underlying challenge to your question is that of cross-level communication. 'Dumb down' your language about your work, but don't sounds condescending or pedantic at the same time. Rather than the existing, good answers, I'd like to give some general rules of thumb when talking about design with 'outsiders'. I've found that some of these help in making ...


7

Before I give a direct answer, I think it's helpful to give a general definition of what we, as designers, do. Namely we design, defined by Oxford's dictionary as The purpose, planning, or intention that exists or is thought to exist behind an action, fact, or material object. In other words, design is being intentional. We have a thought or desire ...


6

Here is my take as an outsider, that is I'm not a designer as you perceive it but rather a mechanical designer that designs machines. Though I have done graphic design work in the past. Most people indeed cannot understand the process. This is hardly surprising, not many people understand mechanical design, plumbing, ikebana or whatever. The thing is this ...


5

Highlighters tend to use fluorescent pigments/dyes to give you the bright colors (AKA, 'higlighted' colors). As such, there is no CMYK combination to emulate them as CMYK doesn't include any colors that would be considered part of the 'fluorescent' color space. If you want a true match, then you need to use a spot color. Pantone has a whole line of ...


4

I use 100%Y at 60% or 70% opacity and set the blend mode to Multiply. I can't say this is "right" or "correct", merely what I prefer. My goal is to provide the appearance of a basic highlighter. I've never been concerned with absolute color matching. Primarily because colors can and do vary by manufacturer. It may seem like I pulled those number out of a ...


4

Things that help designers focus on what's important to a design: Identify the key message - this is what people viewing the design should intuitively grasp, this is the voice or message of the design. Everything in the design should help reinforce the message. This is a careful balancing act as being too blatant can be off-putting and not everything in a ...


3

In my experience, the best approach to have when explaining your work to clients (or other non-creative types) is to focus on what the job of the product is that you’re working on rather than focusing on what job you’re doing. If you’re focused on what the product is supposed to do then you can explain how your graphic decisions help the product do it's job. ...


3

I come late to the party so there is no much to add, but here are my humble additions: My art uses overprinting. Will you be able to do so? I have found that many printers get confused when art uses overprinting, because (apparently) it is not used very often. I always highlight this to them so they are aware that I will be using it. I often set the areas ...


3

The smallest line weight or detail you would be able to print depends on the line screen of the printer. But most digital presses have sub millimeter resolution. With Offset printing it's not a matter of resolution/quality and more about registration. If the line was a knockout fill (white paper showing through) there would be a chance of the ink filling in ...


3

CMYK Jpeg, while valid, has limited support in software, especially in browsers and in-built OS preview handlers. It can also vary by software revision. It may be better for you to export an RGB Jpeg file for your clients preview use or provide a PDF or CMYK TIFF instead. OSX CMYK Jpeg color inversion Windows CMYK Jpeg thumbnails do not display (etc)


2

Alright, first I want to say nothing beats copy. A picture may be worth 1,000 words but you're leaving it up to each viewer to determine what those 1,000 words are. That said as this is a Graphic Design Q&A I'll focus on the Graphic Design aspects. This is somewhat a marketing question and there's no way around that. You have to understand the product ...


2

Inkscape‘s PDF+LaTeX option (when saving as PDF) may be exactly what you want. It saves all non-text aspects of the graphics as a PDF and then creates a LaTeX snippet that imports this PDF and overlays all the text using LaTeX. You load the LaTeX snippet using \input and thus the text has the same font and size as your regular LaTeX text. You can also do ...


2

For Scribus, you would set up a paragraph style (see: stylesheets) such as "figures - Header"; place a text box to overlap the image box, add the "A" and then mark up the "A" with the style. If you edit the style, it will update all instances of the style throughout the document. Using only stylesheets (within reason) is always the best way to proceed and ...


2

You've kinda stated the answer in your question. If you are printing the invitation, "saving for web" is not what you want. To re-state the obvious, that command is for saving files for web use, not print. :) If you need a jpeg for printing purposes, use the File > Export command in Illustrator. After choosing where to save the file, you'll get a dialog box ...


1

This would be a question for the printer. Depending on how the document needs to be setup they may require a certain amount of bleed for the black stroke. This bleed is usually cut off when they trim to the final size. I would suggest asking your printer what they prefer and what their protocol is for strokes on the edges. After edit: If this is to be ...


1

I have not seing Pagemaker in 15 years. I have no idea if you have spot colors paletes there. Doing the PDF export ot Photoshop has no sense becouse you will end with a cmyk or rgb file. A little introduction If you print in at least 2 colors, you have a multicolor print. As simple as that. A verey specific multi-color printing is using the cyan, ...


1

Here's the thing - Sizes that big already need a printer that prints things that are larger than usual, which will usually mean that you need some kind of industrial printer that by default will cost more money than regular prints. The cheapest alternative I can think so will not necessarily be relevant for you but it is widely used for decorating walls and ...


1

Hum. I am not answering the question you asked: when print designing what questions should I ask to make sure my designs are compatible and high quality for print? becouse as a designer it is my obligation to know how to send a proper file depending on my project. I am answering this: When I interview a new provider, what questions should I ask to ...


1

Point out, be visually objective and support your work with proven theories. When you say "non-creative" people I immediately recall Seniors and managers. So think abut it. These people have millions of things in their head day by day, so the best way to talk to them about what you do is being very objective. For real... Enumerate and think very well what ...


1

There may be non-artistic people, but I have very rarely met non-creative people. It's just that their creativity comes out in different areas besides design and art. I find it most effective when selling my concepts to people who are not designers to approach things from a results point of view: what is the purpose for this work in the first place (a ...


1

Yes its true. You customarily never want a stroke weight below 0.25pts. Smaller than .25pt runs the risk of being not picked up entirely when reproduced.



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