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14

Yes, you can have a 2 colors logo with red, black and white. If you speak of standard printing (paper, stock), white is the absence of color. If you were asked for a 2 colors logo, it's probably to be able to print it in 2 colors Pantone (savings on inks) and because the person doesn't want a rainbow of colors for his/her logo. But if you're creating a ...


6

Let's talk about it with examples. So, here we have logo, that have red, black and white in it. This is three color logo. And here is the same logo made in two colors. Let's say, we want to put three-color version on blue background. We don't have blue in our logo, so we can't compensate some color with background and we will need to make three color ...


5

Generally when people talk about how many colors in a logo it originates from print design, and they were referring to which colors they'd have to mix to print the design. It's helpful to consider this when thinking about how many colors in a logo, generally instead of using white ink they'd knock it out to reveal the background color, you don't have to ...


4

You may remember me from "You'll never get that RGB color in CMYK!" Now, you said you wanted something darker than Cyan70 +Yellow100: You don't have much choice to darken your color and keep it bright, you need to add more Cyan! Try C75 + Y100 and keep adding your cyan until you are satisfied. Forget about your RGB green, and work with the good old color ...


4

Yes, in most instances, reducing the saturation of a given color (particularly bright colors) will result in less ink/toner being needed to produce the printed piece. The result can be directly linear when using CMYK swatch values on a CMYK printer. That is to say, 50% opacity of solid (100%) yellow, or a screen of 50% yellow at 100% opacity will result in ...


4

First of all, you might want to start by enlarging the image normally without changing the aspect ratio. Enlarge it so that you will loose some parts of your original photo on the top and bottom, but be careful with repositioning and enlarging to see how much from the top and/or bottom you want to cut off. You will then be left with a smaller empty area on ...


4

It depends on whether or not white will be printed as ink or not. On white paper? 2 color logo. Screenprinted on a green shirt? 3 color logo.


4

This kind of thing is typically screen printed for large quantities. However, for prototyping or for small runs that don't justify the cost of screen printing, a UV-cured flatbed printers can be used. We use ours to print onto plastic and metal all the time with no ink adhesion issues. Just find a sign maker near you and tell them what you're trying to do. ...


4

It depends a lot on where you print, what printer will be used for the task and what you need to do with the files. You might want to stay away from anything JPG because of the compression, that's a start. It can work for huge formats but they are used more as a last option; for example, if you cannot upload a banner of 300mb for printing, you might ...


4

Try resizing your image in Photoshop first to the actual dimensions you will be using in your Illustrator files and re-link your image. I suspect the large dimensions are what is causing the wonkiness.


3

Don't take me wrong anithing I will write here. One thing is extra work and one thing is usless (not usable) work. 1) The 300 ppi output for a raster image is not due people want to save pixels, it is for an intrinsec limitation on a print workflow. Yea in a high quality print you can use a 400ppi image... But 700ppi? No, not really. People do not realize ...


2

For this kind of project: 1. Not only you need to be careful about bleed, but you need to make sure your sticker is a bit bigger than the white area in your book. Otherwise it will look weird and white borders will be visible if the stickers are not perfectly applied! People don't apply stickers perfectly, you need to add a few millimeters to help them a ...


2

What you could do is make a new indesign document with the page size set to the height and width of the panels and make 8 pages so you can drag and drop each panel onto the appropriate page and export it as a pdf. Then you'll be able to flip through each page one by one. That's about the best you can do in terms of seeing each panel by itself. There's ...


2

In terms of resolution No, not even close. I have never seeing a high res screen printing that match a nice inkjet print... Well, there are bad inkjet printers out there, and there are some very smooth ones. A screen print halftone resolution for color selection is arround 50-95 lpi. You could choose not to use a halftone screen printing but to use an ...


2

Without any text... Yes, it's hard to fit 3 square figures on a page, especially if you don't have any text or anything else on it to balance everything. Your only other options than the ones you mentioned in your questions are to alternate your squares if you want to keep the same size. If it's going to be printed at some point, even on an office laser ...


2

Two issues are potentially your obstacles: Is your display monitor calibrated and profiled? If not, you are not even fishing in murky water, you are trying to fish in the desert. What you see on your monitor may be incorrect which will be different from the print MS Word is not a color managed software as far as I know. If this is a one-time deal, you may ...


2

What file format are you using? MS Office products prefer PNG files over all others, even if they aren't using a transparent background. Try saving out as PNG, if you aren't already. I actually think Adobe 1998 is a more widely-used standard for non-Mac, and non-design workflows. It's become much less of an issue over the years, but clearly you're still ...


2

The way you'll make sure overprinting is applied is simply by adding your background color to the color recipe of your gray illustration. Background CMYK + Gray CMYK = Fake Overprint of the gray. If the gray is a rich gray, you don't need to literally add the ink; as long the gray contains the same value or more of yellow/cyan/magenta than your ...


2

The dialog box is very clear: File > Export bitmap In the dialog box choose units: Inches Below will say: width: 600, height: 600 (this is the size in pixels) and little to the right will say 300 ppi. (this is the print resolution) The math behind it is very simple 2 inches, at 300 pixels each inch = 2x300 = 600 px.


2

For print production, white never counts as a "color". White is the stock the piece is printed on. A 1 color logo is black... it prints black. White doesn't print. So yes, a 2-color logo could be red and black. The exceptions to this are silk screening and gravure printing. With those production methods white may indeed need to be printed. But generally ...


2

put your varnishes on the topmost layers--each on a separate layer--do not trap! the print provider will handle it in a way that's best for their process. note: I work in prepress (30 years+) we do not trap varnishes--we do however use a variety of processes depending on the press--sometimes we use what's called a 'strike thru' varnish--the gloss is applied ...


2

Totally depends on print house. Usually they take raw/psd/ai/eps files, pdf is also an option to convert all of those. Each print bureau have their own standards e.g. transparency flattened, pdf below 1.4 version etc. Among tiff, jpeg, jpeg2000, bmp, png - those are rarely used in real print houses. However tiff and bmp have no loss and therefore ...


2

First question. Print where? 1) If you are printing from home use the same aplication you are working in. 2) To print photos. The first option is to print from the original jpg extracted from your camera. If you are shooting in raw, do your processing you need and generate your jpg, the less compression you put, the less the artifacts will show. That also ...


1

I hate to say this but you should really ask the printer for this; he'll tell you what's the max he can print at. If you speak with their prepress department and the printer operators, they'll really tell you in details what's the best process. Don't waste your time with the sales department, (no offense to salesmen) they usually repeat the same cassette ...


1

Per my comment: Firstly lay out your pages individually at A6 size. Then choose your impositioning strategy depending on the sophistication of your printer driver/software and/or follow the advice given on the Scribus Wiki. http://wiki.scribus.net/canvas/PDF,_PostScript_and_Imposition_tools ...


1

You can avoid this problem by using Advanced Crop Marks script. It is free InDesign script that makes creating crop and registration marks very comfortable and intuitive, based on chosen parameters, see the following picture. It can be downloaded for example at the following link: http://www.scriptopedia.org/en/js-indesign/122-advancedcropmarks-en.html. ...


1

Firstly your need to add some navigation in so that you can move between the pages. Switch to the Interactive for PDF workspace. follow these instructions- https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/interactivity-5.html (choosing the forward and back buttons from the sample menu should automatically add the effects to the buttons. Select the pages- in the page ...


1

That would be interesting to see one of your design example and one of your co-worker design to see what you mean. RGB, CMYK There's no issue in working in RGB and then converting to CMYK if you know what you're doing. Anyway some filters are not even available in CMYK mode. What counts is the final result; 1) does it look awesome and 2) Is it well ...


1

In my experience it is almost impossible to perform an artwork which will be 100% perfect, especially, when one's experience is limited and most of imperfections are typical to starters. This is why when I want to press "Send" button I take a break of 10 minutes or so and refresh my mind - after that I re-look at the work and almost always find something to ...


1

I've designed an art book before with hanging indents but I had huge margins which made it look a lot better. I think both can work but having hanging indents would indeed cost more in terms of paper because they would require more space to look good. There are many other factors that will play on legibility. I would only design with hanging indents if I ...



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