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8

It is quite hard to tell from the image that you have posted, but to me it looks like a result of the printing process being unable to reproduce deep or bright colours on the media being used. This is very common on matt and uncoated media. I would expect LAMINATING (or wet varnishing) to help the colours to "pop" You should be able to do a test of this by ...


6

Seeing the larger picture, so to speak, I think your suggested right-flush design won't work. The name would be buried over on the side, with the bullet points wrapping around it, rendering it either clutter or invisible. If your goal is to make this document a quick reference, then the reader is going to have to work to find the person's name, and the ...


5

Well you might not want to use Photoshop but regardless that means 115 inches + 3/8's of an inch is the width, and 38 inches is the height. As far as if that's the Trim or whatnot, you'd have to ask printer. If you are using Photoshop you just use a calculator to divide the fraction in this case 3/8 = 0.375 and then add the 115 to find you need to set your ...


3

A Pantone color Logo is 1 ink. 1 pass on the press. 1 plate. A CMYK logo is 4 inks, 4 passes on the press, 4 plates. Then additional effort to ensure registration is correct. With this in mind a single Pantone color will almost always be less expensive than 4 color process. However... if you are printing a 4C piece and you have a spot color logo, adding a ...


2

If you don't have any white background on your Illustrator file, then there will not be any background on your .ai or .pdf. If you want to test this and make sure there's none, open your .ai created from your Illustrator software in Photoshop. You should get only one layer with the logo on it only and no background. If you see some gray and white ...


2

Trim size = Final cut size without the bleed. Your canvas should be 115 3/8”w x 38”h (115.375 inch x 38 inch) OR 293.05cm x 96.52cm; to this you should add at least 1/4" (0.25") of bleed on each side (or 6 mm on each side). The total of your canvas should be minimum 115 7/8" x 38 1/2" (115.875" x 38.5") OR 294.32cm x 97.79cm (this includes a bleed). The ...


2

You don't have many options if you really want to keep the text in the same exact position on all the pages. You can only shrink the size of all your images to have the same height. You can have a look at catalogs to see how they do it. It's acceptable to have a layout for vertically tall products and one for products that are more horizontally long. ...


2

Ask your printing guys. There are firms that only accept EPS, even in this day and age, because they use an outdated (and cheap!) workflow, where often somewhere along the lines "CorelDRAW" gets mentioned. There are even 'print-only' firms that only accept JPEGs. If your guys are like these, run! and find some other printing guys. You should be counting ...


2

PDF/X-1a is the most common format designed for print production. It is specifically designed to create a universal format that contains all the necessary information for printing. Be certain to include trim marks and bleeds. PNG is never acceptable. JPG can be at times, but it's not that common and there are some important considerations to be aware of - ...


2

Your suggestion would look nice if the bullet points part would be more compact horizontally, as it shows on your first image or if you had 2 columns. With 3 columns, it will end up taking more room vertically and the sentences with the bullet points will be very short on each line. The other issue with having the names aligned on the right is that you ...


2

I don't have the reputation required to post a comment, but I'm wondering if you're using master pages for these layouts and if your content is tagged with the needed paragraph styles. If so, then you as long as all the content is in the primary text frame, it should convert nicely when you apply a different master to the page. I believe more detail on your ...


2

The costs. Scott mentioned. 1 pass of 1 spot color is cheaper than 4 passes crom a cmyk print. 1) If the main subject is to use the logo on a letterhead, some business cards, yeap, you print it using 1 ink, 1 spot color. 2) But if your logo is normally used in a full color photographic catalog, a spot color means an aditional spot color, than mean 1 extra ...


2

4 color printing typically asks for imagery at 300dpi. If the menu is 8" wide, then you need a horizontal resolution of 8x300 = 2400 pixels. Note that the above is for imagery (photos, full color illustration, etc.). Text should ideally be set at an absolute minimum of 600dpi, and more preferably 1200dpi+. This is usually done by not setting type in a ...


2

Don't use a black only at 95%.... make 2 different rich black. One could be 40-40-40-100 and the other 30-30-30-90. Personally I recommend you use a bit more Cyan in your recipes rather than making all your CMY values equal: if the printer is not well calibrated (or is digital), a black with more cyan will still look steel black and not dark brown (eg. ...


2

I think you kind of answered your own question.... " . . . guide for matte coated paper . . ." Some print providers (and paper vendors) refer to uncoated stock as "matte". Other providers/vendors refer to dull coat stock as "matte". For dull coat, it's still a coat, so coated. For uncoated, ermm, yeah uncoated :) The coated/uncoated has more to do ...


1

Right alignment can be legible, but is more of a challenge. In both examples you show, the name (or subhead) needs to stand out more for legibility. You can try adding a paragraph rule to create a black box around the name. In my example below, the subhead is bolder and one point size larger than the original text. Im not sure how you got the bulleted list ...


1

Work at whatever feels comfortable to you if you are working with pen and paper. Then scan it as large as you can with as much PPI as you can. When you scan the drawing, you can scan it at 500% or more and 1200PPI or more... which will allow you to properly size it for larger reproduction than the original drawing. Of course, enlarging it when scanning may ...


1

There's really a lot here and this question is rather broad even though you may not be aware. You most likely will never get a great, accurate color proof from any inkjet printer. You can get very close but much depends upon the printer itself and the nature of the artwork. The Pixima printers (which the Cannon MP280 is) are designed for printing photos. ...


1

The short answer is yes. The GRACoL file will print darker under SWOP conditions. The differences between GRACoL and SWOP depend on which GRACoL and SWOP you’re talking about. The main difference is the amount of ink being laid down on the paper. Typically CRACoL has TAC of 320% and up to 340% depending on the destination of the GRACoL profile used. SWOP ...


1

Assumptions: All your items are the same size as you indicated The orientation does not matter as you can rotate them on paper Here is the process you may follow. The initial setup is a little exacting and time consuming but after that you can lay out the images very quickly on this template. Start a blank document in A4 size On a new blank layer, draw ...


1

In general, it's a question of preference. But yes, designers should always keep in mind the target market, and a rule a lot of us forget is: Is it readable, is it clear? Some designers prefer to be "artsy" and others are more practical. On screen: Gray can be easier to read if you use a dark gray. With a black at 100% on pages with a lot of text, it ...


1

What you see on your monitor is RGB. Yes, it's a CMYK file, and it's likely trying to compensate, but it's still using an RGB model. As such, what you see on screen is usually always more vibrant/saturated than what CMYK can produce. This is due to the reproducible colors being different in each color space: Using coated paper and/or applying a top-coat ...


1

You should send your client an .svg file, which will save the vector qualities, have a transparent background and canne uploaded to a website as an svg, therefore be live as a vector


1

Spiral answer is smart. Not a good idea to use color for your invoice, and so much. It may be enjoyable for you but obviously not for your client. I can also imagine how dirty these full colored sheets are until they dry if they are printed on a standard office paper. Turquoise is: Not easy to scan Not easy to photocopy Uses at least 2 cartridge of ink ...


1

If every element of your graphic is a vector image created in Illustrator, you can create it at any size. That's the beauty of vector graphics. However, if you place a bitmapped image into your Illustrator file, you should create your file at the size that it will be printed - in your case, 60"x60". Regardless of how you output your file, a placed bitmap ...


1

At least 1/8" - 1/4" to be on the safe size. No printer should ask for half an inch - that's really extreme! The bleed is only necessary to ensure that the paper doesn't show when it's trimmed.



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