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15

It's her responsibility. That's why you provide proofs that she can freely take as long as she wants to review. A good trick is to make them write by email that they approve the proof. You ask it this way before sending the final print-ready file: "So, is this approved or do you need any more revisions?" She'll respond a Yes, or No. You got your approval ...


7

If the client was provided a proof, he/she signed off on that proof, and the error was missed by the client, it is the client's responsibility. However, you should have written approval before anything went to production. If you have that. You need not do anything or feel any obligation to address the matter financially. This is the cold, hard truth. It's ...


6

This depends on your contract with said client. It also somewhat depends on the situation and size of error. But in general: NO, if you provided a proof and gave a review and client says send to print then the client has signed the document off. They have approved, and that person takes responsibility. There is a extremely high chance of error in any ...


5

Over the years I have developed a technique to simulate printing with glazing colors (screen printing, offset printing etc.) while working completely non-destructive, remaining full editability through the whole process and being able to easily export greyscale/bitmap masters for each color. Before we start we need to clarify what we want to do: We ...


5

An excellent rule of thumb is to always have a logo and contact information on anything that can be shared individually. Realize people won't take a screenshot of your Facebook page and pass that around, but people might copy the image and pass that around. The only reasons the first image is better are because A) the text is actually readable and B) the ...


4

You need the contact info from the second image. But, keep it short and simple. The text needs to be readable, like the first image. A modern style really helps. The text should be readable even when it is a small image (i.e. a sidebar advert) The photo really can't be stretched. If you have a website, include it. I think it's written over the car logo, ...


4

First of all my suggestion would be to ensure that the aspect ration of the image is maintained. This is one of the most important aspect of making any design aesthetically pleasing. Secondly, my suggestion would be to create a tab on the side of the image, (As I think you have a narrower image than required. This tab can be of the color you want and can ...


4

You have bigger problems than the words. That picture is anti-advertising. The guy in the foreground is sitting down. On the job. Potential customers don't want you camped out at their house for half the day. There's cleaning equipment on the lawn. If you know how hard it is to get a good, even lawn you'd have a fit about this. And the carpets are all ...


3

It is one of two cellophane lamination applied after print, I comes in a film roll format, in matte and glossy, the matte one is the one that has that waxy feel to it.


3

Here are some thoughts that hopefully arn't too off topic. In some cases it may be better to leave out some of the information on the image and place that in the message area on Facebook. One suggestion, have the only text on the image be "$40 OFF MOBILE CAR DETAILING. Example You could add the phone number to the top right. You can get more creative ...


2

The key is proper contrast between text and the background. When you put text on an image, this is always a challenge. It becomes especially challenging when you have a photo like this, where there is no one particular are of dark or lightness overall. To fix that you need to layer in your own elements to create contrast. Here's but a couple of examples. ...


2

In publications there is often no indicator. The lack of any content in a bound publication is enough to know it was intentionally left blank. Blank pages are really only ever an issue in loose sheet letters, where the lack of content may cause confusion. It's never an issue in an actual publication to just have blank pages. In fact often the cover of a ...


2

Logo and SOME contact information should be on all things. Now you don't need all of your contact info on everything. Brick and Mortar Store / Restaurant: Location is needed Online Reseller: Website is needed Service Provider like you: Phone number is needed Now this is just fundamental and gets very open quickly. For example, does someone reserve their ...


1

Branding (logo) and contact info are very important to have on any ad piece. The readability of the second piece is very compromised, I would avoid using outline on text unless it is a header. The actual amount of text does not matter so long as the core message is being delivered concisely and accurately. IMHO $45 off doesn't tell me anything unless I know ...


1

The stars are generally used to indicate a scene change at the top or bottom of a page when a scene change is otherwise indicated by two returns. At the top or bottom of a page, there isn't necessarily room for the extra blank line space, so a row of asterisks is used instead. The only time I've seen a notation about entirely blank pages is in legal and ...


1

With design you can often follow your gut... If it doesn't pop into your mind immediately, it's probably not going to be very intuitive, as a designer I am vaguely aware of a mark used in old books, but I don't think I would recognise it... Most designers if they must signal a page is left blank intentionally will write that as you've noted, however I think ...


1

My suggestion is to create narrow white rectangle box spanning the entire image width and place the discount info in that box. Use simple fonts, no glow or anything just contrasting color for the font. The rest of the info goes just below that white box with contact info on the bottom left corner.



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