Hot answers tagged

42

www.example.com and example.com are two different addresses. It is only a common convention for web servers to be configured such that both variants work the same. This convention is not universal, and some web sites will be set up only to respond to one or the other. You need to confirm with whoever is in charge of the web site, which is acceptable to ...


32

If the client was given opportunity to proof read final files before they went to press, it's the client's responsibility. If you failed to allow the client to proof read before anything went to press, it's your responsibility. Clients should always have the final say before anything is reproduced. That means the client should proofread all files once ...


32

Depends on why you watermark You should not be so concerned with others swiping your designs. What you should be concerned is how to find clients and getting paid. Don't fall into the trap of thinking you're going to lose money at this stage from copying, because even if it happens there's no real way for you to turn it into money. Only care about money ...


28

Yes, ideally all files that need bleed should have it on all sides. The bleed is an extra area that you add to your design to make sure there's no "white border" once the card or flyer is cut. The cutters that print shop use is not 100% perfect, pages might not be aligned or printed perfectly; when you add bleed, you make sure there's color everywhere ...


22

Spot A Pantone is a Pantone when it's a "spot" color. Make sure your Pantone swatches have the color type "spot color". Even if you color swatch says Pantone XYZ, it doesn't make it a Pantone; if it's not a spot color, it will be considered as a process color (CMYK). Conversion during export If you are 100% certain that your swatches are "spot" then ...


19

It's her responsibility. That's why you provide proofs that she can freely take as long as she wants to review. A good trick is to make them write by email that they approve the proof. You ask it this way before sending the final print-ready file: "So, is this approved or do you need any more revisions?" She'll respond a Yes, or No. You got your approval ...


17

www. may have valid technical reasons for being used. When a server is configured it must be set up to use http://www.example.com and http://example.com. It is completely possible that www.example.com loads the site and example.com does not. They are two, different, separate, addresses. This is all controlled by the server. Both addresses may work, or one ...


16

I'd ask for "your logo in a vector file format. This may be an EPS, PDF or SVG file". But be prepared to accept the fact that a lot of these businesses likely don't have a version of their logo in a vector file format. In fact, you'll often encounter businesses that don't even have a proper digital source file of their logo. Getting 'scans from yellow ...


14

Yes, you can have a 2 colors logo with red, black and white. If you speak of standard printing (paper, stock), white is the absence of color. If you were asked for a 2 colors logo, it's probably to be able to print it in 2 colors Pantone (savings on inks) and because the person doesn't want a rainbow of colors for his/her logo. But if you're creating a ...


13

They are trim marks used as a guides to cut the paper. Sometimes, they are double. One set indicates the limit of the bleed and the other indicates where the paper should be cut. The bleed marks are only for reference and not necessary. If you prepare a layout print-ready, it's usually better to add the trim marks; it clearly indicates what size is you ...


12

There is no way to print RGB colors in CYMK simply because you can't 'print' RGB, as it's a projected light color space, not a reflective light (ie, ink) color space. Many colors overlap in RGB and CMYK spaces, but not all, as you've found out. You can use spot colors to print more colors that CMYK can provide--which can get you closer to what you might ...


12

Only watermark if you're trying to license There is only one time to watermark - when you're trying to sell the rights to the image such as a stock graphic. That's it. A good watermark that can actually slow someone down, and I say slow down not stop, is one that ruins your photo, graphic or illustration. All it will do is make your art less appealing to ...


11

I think that your first option is a much better practice. I wouldn't treat a numbered list any different than I would design an alphabetical list. Would you setup a book's index in an alternating-column style? Having a reader's eye scan back and forth across multiple columns doesn't sell the continuity that an ordered list should provide. Multiple column ...


11

How am I supposed to get what the cover tries to tell me? Well reading the article is a good place to start. If that's not sufficient then it might not be the best design either of the cover or the article itself. In this case it did require a bit more research to figure out as they didn't include the below in the article: Are there any cultural, ...


10

If the client was provided a proof, he/she signed off on that proof, and the error was missed by the client, it is the client's responsibility. However, you should have written approval before anything went to production. If you have that. You need not do anything or feel any obligation to address the matter financially. This is the cold, hard truth. It's ...


10

Options: Convert your art to CMYK and print it as-is. Convert your art to CMYK, and manually adjust the values to increase their vibrancy. (RGB to CMYK conversion can make things look muddy, especially those bright blues). If you're in photoshop, you can try a few different Adjustment Layers to get the colors closer to where you want it. Color Balance and ...


9

Most commercial printers will provide a color proof that is ostensibly a very good representation of the final output. Probably will have an additional cost attached to it, but definitely ask about it. If they decline to offer a proof before final printing, you may want to look around elsewhere for another printer. Also, make sure your image is in CMYK ...


9

These are crop marks, they indicate how the paper is to be cut after printing. This ensures amongst other things that the color reaches all the way to the edge of your paper*. But you could use crop marks to make custom sized pages, mark your signatures etc. * Printers in general can't print over page edges, they do on the other hand cut things into size ...


9

This depends on your contract with said client. It also somewhat depends on the situation and size of error. But in general: NO, if you provided a proof and gave a review and client says send to print then the client has signed the document off. They have approved, and that person takes responsibility. There is a extremely high chance of error in any ...


9

Everything that has been said is right on point. The dialog that you should have is" "I need all of your design assets for this project. I need your logo in a vector or high resolution format in order to print it correctly. I need all images in high resolution. I need all licensed fonts you intend to use. If you don't have these assets in the proper format, ...


8

When the client is the knowledge expert, the client must be responsible for the accuracy of that content assuming the client had the opportunity to review the material. I authored a technical manual and hired two editors. One of them knew nothing of the content. Her job was strictly clarity, continuity and grammatical accuracy. With the second editor, ...


8

It is quite hard to tell from the image that you have posted, but to me it looks like a result of the printing process being unable to reproduce deep or bright colours on the media being used. This is very common on matt and uncoated media. I would expect LAMINATING (or wet varnishing) to help the colours to "pop" You should be able to do a test of this by ...


8

What I do in that situation is use the clone stamp tool and expand what's missing on the picture, in the most natural way possible. It's ok if it's not perfect since it's in the bleed zone and printers rarely really use that area outside the edge, even though it has to be there, just in case. In general, printers can accept smaller bleed, as long you have ...


8

Cromalin proofing was something I used to do, daily, as a pre-press lithographer. After we had produced the 4-colour negatives for a print job, we would coat a piece of gloss white card with a clear photosensitive layer, using a heat roller. Then we would expose the yellow negative under the same halogen lights that we would use for exposing plates or for ...


8

You could speak of edge painting or fore-edge painting, or gilt-edged for the golden variant.


7

Over the years I have developed a technique to simulate printing with glazing colors (screen printing, offset printing etc.) while working completely non-destructive, remaining full editability through the whole process and being able to easily export greyscale/bitmap masters for each color. Before we start we need to clarify what we want to do: We ...


7

Unless there is a specific need to convert it to bitmap (raster image, as others have explained in comments) because, for instance, this is all your printer can handle, none of those. Always leave vector art as vector art. Export to PDF and print (or have it printed) from that (unless you need to print directly from your own Illu to your own printer; in that ...


7

What you are referring to is called TAC or Total Area Coverage; it is usually defined by your printer. 300% is a good personal limit, as many range from around 240 to 320. If it is personal work it is completely down to your judgement.


7

1: No. The printer will print the image using the most appropriate resolution it has at its disposal. This is why we have drivers. 2: Short answer, yes. Long answer, it depends. Depending on how the printer software uses the word "quality", the printer may use more or less ink. In some cases, a "draft" quality will use less ink (and produce a lower quality ...


7

The title of the article 'Tauba Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas Depicts Every Color Imaginable' is misleading. As you already said RGB is intended for screen display and not print. It is - as far as I am aware - impossible to faithfully reproduce all RGB colors using offset printing. Even if it was possible to reproduce all RGB colors, no RGB color space ...



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