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32

Depends on why you watermark You should not be so concerned with others swiping your designs. What you should be concerned is how to find clients and getting paid. Don't fall into the trap of thinking you're going to lose money at this stage from copying, because even if it happens there's no real way for you to turn it into money. Only care about money ...


22

Spot A Pantone is a Pantone when it's a "spot" color. Make sure your Pantone swatches have the color type "spot color". Even if you color swatch says Pantone XYZ, it doesn't make it a Pantone; if it's not a spot color, it will be considered as a process color (CMYK). Conversion during export If you are 100% certain that your swatches are "spot" then ...


16

I'd ask for "your logo in a vector file format. This may be an EPS, PDF or SVG file". But be prepared to accept the fact that a lot of these businesses likely don't have a version of their logo in a vector file format. In fact, you'll often encounter businesses that don't even have a proper digital source file of their logo. Getting 'scans from yellow pages'...


14

Yes, you can have a 2 colors logo with red, black and white. If you speak of standard printing (paper, stock), white is the absence of color. If you were asked for a 2 colors logo, it's probably to be able to print it in 2 colors Pantone (savings on inks) and because the person doesn't want a rainbow of colors for his/her logo. But if you're creating a ...


12

There is no way to print RGB colors in CYMK simply because you can't 'print' RGB, as it's a projected light color space, not a reflective light (ie, ink) color space. Many colors overlap in RGB and CMYK spaces, but not all, as you've found out. You can use spot colors to print more colors that CMYK can provide--which can get you closer to what you might ...


12

Only watermark if you're trying to license There is only one time to watermark - when you're trying to sell the rights to the image such as a stock graphic. That's it. A good watermark that can actually slow someone down, and I say slow down not stop, is one that ruins your photo, graphic or illustration. All it will do is make your art less appealing to ...


11

I think that your first option is a much better practice. I wouldn't treat a numbered list any different than I would design an alphabetical list. Would you setup a book's index in an alternating-column style? Having a reader's eye scan back and forth across multiple columns doesn't sell the continuity that an ordered list should provide. Multiple column ...


11

How am I supposed to get what the cover tries to tell me? Well reading the article is a good place to start. If that's not sufficient then it might not be the best design either of the cover or the article itself. In this case it did require a bit more research to figure out as they didn't include the below in the article: Are there any cultural, ...


10

Options: Convert your art to CMYK and print it as-is. Convert your art to CMYK, and manually adjust the values to increase their vibrancy. (RGB to CMYK conversion can make things look muddy, especially those bright blues). If you're in photoshop, you can try a few different Adjustment Layers to get the colors closer to where you want it. Color Balance and ...


9

Everything that has been said is right on point. The dialog that you should have is" "I need all of your design assets for this project. I need your logo in a vector or high resolution format in order to print it correctly. I need all images in high resolution. I need all licensed fonts you intend to use. If you don't have these assets in the proper format, ...


8

Cromalin proofing was something I used to do, daily, as a pre-press lithographer. After we had produced the 4-colour negatives for a print job, we would coat a piece of gloss white card with a clear photosensitive layer, using a heat roller. Then we would expose the yellow negative under the same halogen lights that we would use for exposing plates or for ...


8

It is quite hard to tell from the image that you have posted, but to me it looks like a result of the printing process being unable to reproduce deep or bright colours on the media being used. This is very common on matt and uncoated media. I would expect LAMINATING (or wet varnishing) to help the colours to "pop" You should be able to do a test of this by ...


8

What I do in that situation is use the clone stamp tool and expand what's missing on the picture, in the most natural way possible. It's ok if it's not perfect since it's in the bleed zone and printers rarely really use that area outside the edge, even though it has to be there, just in case. In general, printers can accept smaller bleed, as long you have ...


8

You could speak of edge painting or fore-edge painting, or gilt-edged for the golden variant.


7

Unless there is a specific need to convert it to bitmap (raster image, as others have explained in comments) because, for instance, this is all your printer can handle, none of those. Always leave vector art as vector art. Export to PDF and print (or have it printed) from that (unless you need to print directly from your own Illu to your own printer; in that ...


7

What you are referring to is called TAC or Total Area Coverage; it is usually defined by your printer. 300% is a good personal limit, as many range from around 240 to 320. If it is personal work it is completely down to your judgement.


7

1: No. The printer will print the image using the most appropriate resolution it has at its disposal. This is why we have drivers. 2: Short answer, yes. Long answer, it depends. Depending on how the printer software uses the word "quality", the printer may use more or less ink. In some cases, a "draft" quality will use less ink (and produce a lower quality ...


7

The title of the article 'Tauba Auerbach’s RGB Colorspace Atlas Depicts Every Color Imaginable' is misleading. As you already said RGB is intended for screen display and not print. It is - as far as I am aware - impossible to faithfully reproduce all RGB colors using offset printing. Even if it was possible to reproduce all RGB colors, no RGB color space ...


7

If it's on the web.. watermarking doesn't hurt... but realize anything on the web will be stolen at some point. If you are the over-protective type, never put anything on the web you don't want stolen. A watermark really only deters casual theft, but anyone serious about using your work will either: A) not care there's a mark or B) use Photoshop to ...


6

Seeing the larger picture, so to speak, I think your suggested right-flush design won't work. The name would be buried over on the side, with the bullet points wrapping around it, rendering it either clutter or invisible. If your goal is to make this document a quick reference, then the reader is going to have to work to find the person's name, and the "...


6

Let's talk about it with examples. So, here we have logo, that have red, black and white in it. This is three color logo. And here is the same logo made in two colors. Let's say, we want to put three-color version on blue background. We don't have blue in our logo, so we can't compensate some color with background and we will need to make three color ...


6

No I'm afraid there's no way around this. It would be extremely lucrative if you could do this, so if you ever discover how to do this its worth millions of dollars easily, if not hundreds of millions. Color is actually a considerably more complicated problem than it initially appears. Even RGB isn't same on different devices, although we are moving slowly ...


6

The New Times Magazine brand is, apparently, a solid color with the logo, usually with a single strong vignette or silhouette image, or a photo full-bleed. This particular cover is no different except they chose for some reason to feature a photograph in a rectangular aspect that does not conform to the aspect of the magazine. So it means they liked the ...


6

Do a mock up... Construct the box! The size is quite small so you are fine. There are some copy stores where you can print a Tabloid size paper. Try to use the thickest paper possible. You can also print on adhesive paper and paste into a thicker paper, but the print could crack on the folds. A comment. I am scared by the idea that designers do not use ...


6

The texture you're talking about comes from the screen on which the wet paper slurry is poured, allowing the majority of the water to drain away. It comes in two basic flavours: laid (most of the wires in the screen go only one direction, usually horizontally across the page, with only a few wires going the other direction) or wove (more like window ...


5

Well you might not want to use Photoshop but regardless that means 115 inches + 3/8's of an inch is the width, and 38 inches is the height. As far as if that's the Trim or whatnot, you'd have to ask printer. If you are using Photoshop you just use a calculator to divide the fraction in this case 3/8 = 0.375 and then add the 115 to find you need to set your ...


5

This is building on David Mulders answer, and things others have said but this is something I've wanted to do for a long time and have never got round to doing. An Interactive Digital Invoice Having the whole invoice system online is actually a great Idea. You are almost guaranteed that the invoice is going to be received via an internet enabled device (be ...


5

Spiral answer is smart. Not a good idea to use color for your invoice, and so much. It may be enjoyable for you but obviously not for your client. I can also imagine how dirty these full colored sheets are until they dry if they are printed on a standard office paper. Turquoise is: Not easy to scan Not easy to photocopy Uses at least 2 cartridge of ink ...


5

You may remember me from "You'll never get that RGB color in CMYK!" Now, you said you wanted something darker than Cyan70 +Yellow100: You don't have much choice to darken your color and keep it bright, you need to add more Cyan! Try C75 + Y100 and keep adding your cyan until you are satisfied. Forget about your RGB green, and work with the good old color ...


5

Yes, in most instances, reducing the saturation of a given color (particularly bright colors) will result in less ink/toner being needed to produce the printed piece. The result can be directly linear when using CMYK swatch values on a CMYK printer. That is to say, 50% opacity of solid (100%) yellow, or a screen of 50% yellow at 100% opacity will result in ...



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