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It depends a lot on where you print, what printer will be used for the task and what you need to do with the files. You might want to stay away from anything JPG because of the compression, that's a start. It can work for huge formats but they are used more as a last option; for example, if you cannot upload a banner of 300mb for printing, you might ...


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Totally depends on print house. Usually they take raw/psd/ai/eps files, pdf is also an option to convert all of those. Each print bureau have their own standards e.g. transparency flattened, pdf below 1.4 version etc. Among tiff, jpeg, jpeg2000, bmp, png - those are rarely used in real print houses. However tiff and bmp have no loss and therefore ...


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PDF, EPS, TIFF or native application files (.ai, .psd, .indd). If they are strictly photos... .tiff or .psd For Indesign files, .pdf For Illustrator .ai or .eps or .pdf, but in some cases .tiff works better.


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The transparency may be calculated differently in each program, and I see one is rasterized, while the other is not. You need to define an exact color value for each section (probably just 2 colors for this mark), have the symbol broken into its pieces, and then you can achieve full consistency between applications. If you aren't doing this, at least have a ...


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The TPX ink s are used on textile and paints. There's some converter online but apparently you won't always find a good match there; some Pantones don't have an exact equivalent in TPX. http://www.pantone.com/pages/pantone/colorfinder.aspx So the best way to find the equivalent of you TPX in Pantone will be to use a Solid Coated Pantone color book and ...


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put your varnishes on the topmost layers--each on a separate layer--do not trap! the print provider will handle it in a way that's best for their process. note: I work in prepress (30 years+) we do not trap varnishes--we do however use a variety of processes depending on the press--sometimes we use what's called a 'strike thru' varnish--the gloss is applied ...


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I'm not sure why your InDesign doesn't interpret well that transparency. Maybe you need to use PDFx or check your export settings. Personally I don't use much drop shadows and transparency in these software because of that kind of surprise or the white rectangles it often creates on the PDF. It's alright for printing but if you need that file for web too, ...


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This kind of thing is typically screen printed for large quantities. However, for prototyping or for small runs that don't justify the cost of screen printing, a UV-cured flatbed printers can be used. We use ours to print onto plastic and metal all the time with no ink adhesion issues. Just find a sign maker near you and tell them what you're trying to do. ...


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Let's talk about it with examples. So, here we have logo, that have red, black and white in it. This is three color logo. And here is the same logo made in two colors. Let's say, we want to put three-color version on blue background. We don't have blue in our logo, so we can't compensate some color with background and we will need to make three color ...


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It depends on whether or not white will be printed as ink or not. On white paper? 2 color logo. Screenprinted on a green shirt? 3 color logo.


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For print production, white never counts as a "color". White is the stock the piece is printed on. A 1 color logo is black... it prints black. White doesn't print. So yes, a 2-color logo could be red and black. The exceptions to this are silk screening and gravure printing. With those production methods white may indeed need to be printed. But generally ...


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Yes, you can have a 2 colors logo with red, black and white. If you speak of standard printing (paper, stock), white is the absence of color. If you were asked for a 2 colors logo, it's probably to be able to print it in 2 colors Pantone (savings on inks) and because the person doesn't want a rainbow of colors for his/her logo. But if you're creating a ...


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Generally when people talk about how many colors in a logo it originates from print design, and they were referring to which colors they'd have to mix to print the design. It's helpful to consider this when thinking about how many colors in a logo, generally instead of using white ink they'd knock it out to reveal the background color, you don't have to ...


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It would seem to depend on how you define the saturation spectrum. In some cases, it's 'pure color' to 'black': But sometimes it's 'pure color' to 'white': In both cases, going from 100% pure color, yes, it looks like you'd use less ink. But in the former example, you are replacing some of the color with black. So it's not as big of a difference than ...


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Yes, in most instances, reducing the saturation of a given color (particularly bright colors) will result in less ink/toner being needed to produce the printed piece. The result can be directly linear when using CMYK swatch values on a CMYK printer. That is to say, 50% opacity of solid (100%) yellow, or a screen of 50% yellow at 100% opacity will result in ...


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Use overprint on stroke You simply set that line to "Overprint" in the "Attribute" panel of Illustrator. This way that line will not affect any other CMYK or spot separation and will not be "trapped." Also, use a spot color on that stroke and rename it That white line should also be a "spot color" and you should rename that spot color "dieline"; this ...


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I hate to say this but you should really ask the printer for this; he'll tell you what's the max he can print at. If you speak with their prepress department and the printer operators, they'll really tell you in details what's the best process. Don't waste your time with the sales department, (no offense to salesmen) they usually repeat the same cassette ...


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The dialog box is very clear: File > Export bitmap In the dialog box choose units: Inches Below will say: width: 600, height: 600 (this is the size in pixels) and little to the right will say 300 ppi. (this is the print resolution) The math behind it is very simple 2 inches, at 300 pixels each inch = 2x300 = 600 px.


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You can avoid this problem by using Advanced Crop Marks script. It is free InDesign script that makes creating crop and registration marks very comfortable and intuitive, based on chosen parameters, see the following picture. It can be downloaded for example at the following link: http://www.scriptopedia.org/en/js-indesign/122-advancedcropmarks-en.html. ...


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Firstly your need to add some navigation in so that you can move between the pages. Switch to the Interactive for PDF workspace. follow these instructions- https://helpx.adobe.com/indesign/using/interactivity-5.html (choosing the forward and back buttons from the sample menu should automatically add the effects to the buttons. Select the pages- in the page ...


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That would be interesting to see one of your design example and one of your co-worker design to see what you mean. RGB, CMYK There's no issue in working in RGB and then converting to CMYK if you know what you're doing. Anyway some filters are not even available in CMYK mode. What counts is the final result; 1) does it look awesome and 2) Is it well ...


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What makes you assume that the image was converted to CMYK? Is the information in the Acrobat information? If in doubt, you may try opening the PDF file in Photoshop and then treating it like any other image. If it indeed comes in as CMYK, you may be better off converting it to RGB and a suitable color space before adjusting and printing it.


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Open your PDF in Adobe Acrobat, select Tools -> Pages -> Crop Then draw a rectangle around the content you want to keep Then double-click that rectangle Use this dialog to trim the white margins of your pages, then retrying printing.


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Don't take me wrong anithing I will write here. One thing is extra work and one thing is usless (not usable) work. 1) The 300 ppi output for a raster image is not due people want to save pixels, it is for an intrinsec limitation on a print workflow. Yea in a high quality print you can use a 400ppi image... But 700ppi? No, not really. People do not realize ...


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Word is a bit quirky. In anycase you can get perfect quality pictures from word. There are 2 options as I see it. If you have a PostScript printer then you can embed EPS with all photoshop print goodies like color correction and priner calibrations. For this to work: both your printer and monitor need to be profiled, or better yet calibrated. Otherwise ...


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It's normal that the colors on the screen are always brighter than the ones on paper. There's also other factors like the type of paper you use and the printer itself. And as it was mentioned in the other answers, Microsoft Words is a text editing software and doesn't have much accuracy for color management. I don't know with the new versions of Words but ...


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Two issues are potentially your obstacles: Is your display monitor calibrated and profiled? If not, you are not even fishing in murky water, you are trying to fish in the desert. What you see on your monitor may be incorrect which will be different from the print MS Word is not a color managed software as far as I know. If this is a one-time deal, you may ...


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What file format are you using? MS Office products prefer PNG files over all others, even if they aren't using a transparent background. Try saving out as PNG, if you aren't already. I actually think Adobe 1998 is a more widely-used standard for non-Mac, and non-design workflows. It's become much less of an issue over the years, but clearly you're still ...


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The way you'll make sure overprinting is applied is simply by adding your background color to the color recipe of your gray illustration. Background CMYK + Gray CMYK = Fake Overprint of the gray. If the gray is a rich gray, you don't need to literally add the ink; as long the gray contains the same value or more of yellow/cyan/magenta than your ...


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In my experience it is almost impossible to perform an artwork which will be 100% perfect, especially, when one's experience is limited and most of imperfections are typical to starters. This is why when I want to press "Send" button I take a break of 10 minutes or so and refresh my mind - after that I re-look at the work and almost always find something to ...


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There is always some cut-off point in the graphics industry - a Point of No Return. What that is, depends entirely on the total workflow. Not everything will get printed right away (unless it's a real rush job). Even when it's already printed, not everything gets cut and further prepared. Even when it's already cut and packaged, it doesn't get send to the ...


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I've designed an art book before with hanging indents but I had huge margins which made it look a lot better. I think both can work but having hanging indents would indeed cost more in terms of paper because they would require more space to look good. There are many other factors that will play on legibility. I would only design with hanging indents if I ...


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Basicly they are using an aplication that does not read right a cmyk file (or you did not embed it). The visualization is not a problem, the problem could be that that program does not recognize embeded profiles. Anyway, make a sample print and make decisions based on that. Or use an RGB file, but still, you need to make a test. If the project is ...


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sorry, cannot comment yet, am still a new member today, so here my humble answer: You are asking about peoples feelings. And about space (cost). I would personally have much better readability, if you would use the space you "lost" leftside through your hanging indents and turned them into whitespace between your paragraphs. I.e. try another new-line ...


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If you really want your printer to print your document on green paper, then you can visualize this with Scribus: Open your document in Scribus Click File > Document Setup > Display > Colors (at tab) > Fill Color Now in the window, select a color that corresponds to your paper. Now click OK or Apply. Now - just on your screen - Scribus will show you ...


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The color separation itself is done by the printer. All you'll need to do is send your files properly. You don't need to worry about the lineature and angle but only the resolution (ppi/dpi) of your files. You should use 300ppi resolution in Photoshop (go in the menu "image" then "image size"). Be careful, the resolution must be 300ppi for the actual ...


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There are programs specifically designed to do this (AccuRIP, Separation Studio), but they are quite expensive; unless you're a print shop then that cost will be difficult to justify. As others have already mentioned, the print shop you're dealing with will likely do the separations for you (and probably have the powerful software to do so). Within the ...


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First, make sure that it will indeed be printed on an offset printer because there are many printers who will print on digital printers where the input is expected to be RGB. If it will be offset printed, you may be better off converting your file to CMYK and letting them prepare the color separation. I presume you have a calibrated monitor. When you ...


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Okay, this is not an answer - flavor generally means a style or taste. I tried to imagine what a flavor would look like. I found: Wiley Flavour and Fragrance Journal which is interesting. Then: Wix Templates which if you call each style a flavor, you're getting there. I would call the first one (IP Law Firm - Kant & Rider) mint, but I got a bit ...


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Without any text... Yes, it's hard to fit 3 square figures on a page, especially if you don't have any text or anything else on it to balance everything. Your only other options than the ones you mentioned in your questions are to alternate your squares if you want to keep the same size. If it's going to be printed at some point, even on an office laser ...


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As Rafael suggested, "flavor" in that context means they want to see different variations of the logo. In other words, they just want to see a set of drafts, a proof with a few suggestions for the logos! Nothing special, just another way to ask you to prepare more than one logo to choose from. You should simply create a few different drafts of logos to ...


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Hum... This is a gess, but I think they are refering to "style" probably one with some gradient, a version on just one ink, one specific with black ink, one version for dark background. If it is on the revisions stage could be to decide which look to choose.


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Rotogravure is used for very huge quantities of prints because of the cost of the cylinders that are used instead of plates; engraving the cylinders is more expensive than standards plates. They are also more resistant to large runs compared to normal offset plates that can easily get scratches or need to be prepared again after a certain quantity. That a ...


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White ink... We need a brief explanation of some ink categories and print processes. Process inks are semi transparent inks, they use the white (or whatever paper color you have) and start removing light reflected from it to produce different colors. AKA the CMYK subtractive model. Spot color inks are a little more opaque, depending on what system are you ...


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What to use if for? Is for long runs, hundreds of thousands, so it is (or was, I am not sure) used in newspapers, where you did not needed a superb resolution, needed fast print process, one ink, and long run. That was the main factor, durability on long runs. But I don't know if it is very widley used today. The newspapers need a higher resolution now, ...


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You may remember me from "You'll never get that RGB color in CMYK!" Now, you said you wanted something darker than Cyan70 +Yellow100: You don't have much choice to darken your color and keep it bright, you need to add more Cyan! Try C75 + Y100 and keep adding your cyan until you are satisfied. Forget about your RGB green, and work with the good old color ...


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Per my comment: Firstly lay out your pages individually at A6 size. Then choose your impositioning strategy depending on the sophistication of your printer driver/software and/or follow the advice given on the Scribus Wiki. http://wiki.scribus.net/canvas/PDF,_PostScript_and_Imposition_tools ...


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What you could do is make a new indesign document with the page size set to the height and width of the panels and make 8 pages so you can drag and drop each panel onto the appropriate page and export it as a pdf. Then you'll be able to flip through each page one by one. That's about the best you can do in terms of seeing each panel by itself. There's ...


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In terms of resolution No, not even close. I have never seeing a high res screen printing that match a nice inkjet print... Well, there are bad inkjet printers out there, and there are some very smooth ones. A screen print halftone resolution for color selection is arround 50-95 lpi. You could choose not to use a halftone screen printing but to use an ...


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In Photoshop you would simply make the nonprinting guides for you to use as a visual guide and make the canvas size 5mm larger on each side. Since you are working on a file that will be printed, the best program to use at this stage would be InDesign. When creating a new document, add a bleed of 5mm to each side. Then, import the psd into InDesign at ...



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