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0

Don't use PNG. Use jpeg instead, which can have include ppi and a print size in its metadata. PNG was never intended to be a print format, and this is the kind of situation where it shows. The PNG published standard doesn't contain the necessary metadata to specify either ppi or print size, so browsers aren't necessarily going to see it even if it's there, ...


2

Disclaimer: this is based on my assumptions of what the problem may have originally been--which in turn is based on common printing issues. Comic books were never printed on what we'd call high quality presses or high quality paper (they are today, but not back then). It was essentially newsprint. This means you had to deal with a lot of printing ...


4

The opacity of the colors in your file have no real bearing on the opacity of the substrate you are printing on nor the inks that would be used. In other words, if you have a layer of 100% black set to 50% transparency, that doesn't mean you will print with black ink that is 50% transparent. Rather, you will print with solid black ink that will have 50% ...


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This site explains the process of coloring comics during the 60's (when the Hulk started) http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/sgrais/comics_color.htm snip The possible combinations of these tints gave colorists a palette of 64 possible colors to use in the books, though most used no more than half of them. Many of the darker colors were indistinguishable in ...


1

I would use two different stylesheets. One stylesheet for on screen, and another print stylesheet to specify sizing when your page is printed. This way you will be able to adjust your CSS appropriately for various devices, as well as specify inches or centimeters for a printed page. Check out these resources for making a print stylesheet. And for achieving ...


0

Interesting - I hadn't heard of this before. I do know that comic books have tended to be printed on cheap "newsprint"-like paper and that may have an impact on ink coverages and how colors display. Red perhaps might look a bit muddy - perhaps almost brown-like - on such cheap paper. But then there's Superman which shows that reds are possible in comic ...


0

Don't send Photoshop to do a vector or page layout job. Turn it around. Export the .psd to a .eps and place that in Illustrator, then import the logo (or paste it). Even better, place the .psd into InDesign, then import the Illustrator .ai logo, then export to a .pdf. Best — rebuild the layout in InDesign.


2

Without seeing the actual logo it's not possible to give a definitive answer to this, but importing it as a Shape Layer or vector paths would be the best way to do it if it's a simple logo, because your PSD would then contain live vector shapes that would output cleanly to PDF. When you import a vector logo (or any other vector) as a Smart Object, Photoshop ...


0

I would say use a smart object, however you could try doing 'save for web'as a PNG. This gives you more options than the default export, such as image scaling and the type of smoothing applied (none, art or text optimized smoothing). for best quality probably use 'art' smoothing and a large image scaling for best resolution (it should say the pixel ...


-1

Fix the printable area and document area same as Manual Duplex Printing. I think it can solve your problem.


2

This is screen printing. You could find a local shop that does things like plaques, mementos, trophies, etc.. Most such places screen print many of their items, so you'd just find one that does, give them a sample and ask them for a quote. If you're contracting with a packaging house to fill the jars, they probably also have the facility to screen print the ...


2

The problem with short runs is that setup costs for offset printing are a significant part of the cost, particularly for work involving spot color. Two approaches worth considering are Digital Print-on-Demand shops, even including such services as Lightning Source, CreateSpace and Smartpress. These are set up for short runs, have good bindery operations, ...


4

You need to find a printer who has a 2-colour press on which they print different colours each day of the week — this used to be a common practice. Neat thing is, you can get duplex printing w/ a single plate charge by using a “work-and-turn” (or similar flipping) if the piece is half the plate size or smaller.


0

On the print options page, choose 'Page Setup' then change paper size to US Legal (14 X 8.5 inches). After, go back to 'Print Options', view the drop down menu under 'Scaling'. Choose 'Fit to Page'. There is no need to change margin sizes, this will automatically fit your content within the size of your art board, in this case, 14 X 8.5 inches.


0

The designer's dilemma: how to satisfy both of a client's mutually-exclusive requirements. We've all been there. A "quiet ad that really pops," an elegant layout using multiple Day-Glo inks, a small page count for a long document while keeping the text large. Each of these is an oxymoron. Trying to achieve the obviously-unachievable will only lead to ...


1

Your design is great! If I were to publish, your book will be a standard I would try to achieve. Your introduction does your work no justice. My preamble to my answer is "It has been 20 years since I have opened a style guide for writing." At least I have some recent relevant experience: I'll spend hours reading articles, books, and web pages to research ...


0

Here's what I would do: Find a runny stain as well as some grain texture. Work this first in black and white...You might want to calibrate levels on your source images so they merge together better. Use masks to merge the running stain to the portrait and use layer modes for the texture (e.g. Multiply). Using an extra layer on top of it all and layer ...


3

If you are sending the PDF to a print service provider, it's always best to check with them to find what format they prefer. That said, PDF-X/1a is the safest PDF format for general-purpose printing, and you are unlikely to come across a print shop that can't use it. If your booklet includes bleed, you must turn that on in the PDF dialog (under "Marks and ...


3

For most commercial printing you should simply export to PDF/X-1a format as single pages with marks and bleeds. If you are uncertain of PDF configuration for your print provider, you need to ask your provider how they want PDFs configured.


1

This is the way I've done it. Select All then Edit>Recolor Artwork. There is a Folder Icon on the top right of the panel. This will create a Swatch Group of all the used Colors. Cancel this panel unless you would like to merge colors etc. Delete the other colors in the swatch. Good Luck. Edit: If you have 2 very similar blacks the Edit Colors panel ...


1

With no art selected, you can highlight a swatch and use Select > Same > Fill & Stroke to find what objects used that swatch. You can also use Select All Unused from the Swatch Panel Menu which will highlight the unused swatches. Note this tends to leave behind an orange and a green due to their use in Symbols. Brushes, symbols etc which use a ...


2

150 ppi is plenty of resolution if you're printing on canvas. If you expect your piece to be viewed from a few inches away (less than 16), then 300 ppi is more than sufficient. Beyond that point you're just adding to the file size without adding visible image information in the final product. On high-grade art paper, you can go as high as 600 ppi. Beyond ...


0

This is indeed a printed effect. I have a physical sample of my company logo printed on a book cover using this same effect to the degree that it is raised almost 1.5mm above the surface. photoslive.com are able to do the same - but i have not been able to determine what equipment is used.



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