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3

If I understand correctly, your assets are: CMYK logo Grayscale image This is what I would do Create an empty CMYK PSD file Copy your grayscale image Open the Channels palette. Windows->Channels Click on the Black channel (the last one) and paste your (previously copied) grayscale image. This pastes it ONLY in the K layer, so it will be rendered with ...


0

In addition to e100 great answer, using shadows with blur on text may be a good trick.


2

The most effective way to tackle this project would be to start in a 3D app like Maya, Cinema 4D or Blender, unfold the UV map and export the distorted texture. Experimenting in Photoshop CC, I applied this as a texture map to a simple 3D sphere: Then, using the (new in 2014) 3D > Generate UVs... command like this I came up with a texture map ...


2

For sending a document to be printed, don't use PNG as the export format. There are three reasons for this: A printing press uses CMYK, and PNG is an RGB-only format. If your document contains text, that text will be rasterized and will print at the resolution of your PNG (perhaps 300 ppi) instead of the 2800 dpi at which live text or vector information is ...


1

As others have noted, white = paper in the print world unless you request it to be otherwise. When using a specialty stock, it is often useful to have a reference background while designing and during the early in-house proofing process. For this purpose, I create a separate layer below all artwork that contains a scan of the stock or a representative ...


2

If you are printing in CMYK (which most of the time you will) you will note that there is no 'white ink'. In other words, whatever is white in your file is 'transparent' when it goes to press. So what is white on your document will be 'the paper'.


5

I don't believe that the option exists as print-layout software is focused on laying ink on paper. Since "white" is the absence of ink, it acts as a transparent background. Keep on mind that unless you are laying a base of ink as a spot color on top of your specialty paper, you will not have any "white" areas in your print. In fact all non-black colors will ...


7

I was hoping someone with experience of this sort of vinyl print design would answer but since they haven't yet, here's what I'd try if it was me dropped in at the deep end on this project: I haven't tried actually making the sphere but it looks like all the joins and curves would be in the right places to straighten and match when the template is printed ...


2

Depending on what you have to print, hydrographics might come in handy. Basically, you start with a 2D film and dip the object in water. The film sticks to it. I've seen helmets and various objects done but if it requires to be very precise that may not be helpful.


5

We'd likely need to refer you to this question--namely the first line of the first answer: Ask your vendor. Alas, that's the only 'correct' answer here as whatever solution you come up with, you're going to have to be partnering with your vendor that will be printing it. And they are going to help you figure out the specific software, layout, ...


4

Spherical projections onto a 2D surface can quickly get complicated and confusing. The image in that forum post is what's known as an "interrupted projection". It's quite similar to an interrupted sinusoidal projection. I understand you're probably not making a globe of the Earth, but you might have better luck searching for cartography solutions. This ...


3

If you are looking for an opensource program there is Inkscape. Some apparel/embroidery shops do use Coredraw. There is always Illustrator but if you purchase Adobe's design package it does come with InDesign which can be used, too. In regards to fitting a sphere, from your prior questions, it would depend on the artwork setup and you should consider the ...


2

One option, you could do is setup a specific CSS stylesheet for your website for print. This way you can designate a style different than your site. It's as simple as adding new styles inside a media query of your stylesheet and add the new styles inside. @media print{ print style here } This site has a pretty good breakdown. ...


6

RGB color is for light-producing situations, and is additive, which means that you are adding light of one color to light of another color, resulting in more light and a mixed color. CMYK color is for light-absorbing situations, and is subtractive, which means that you are absorbing light instead of reflecting it, and mixing two pigments results in ...


7

RGB is a color space that can only exist with projected light. It's physically impossible to replicate it on paper, which is a reflected light color space. So no, no printing press can 'print RGB'. At best, prepress RIP software can convert from RGB to CMYK. In fact, this is what most prepress software workflows do. How they convert to CMYK can vary ...


0

Sorry, I'm with Scott in my QXP rustiness. But I used to be a master ... In the old days (QXP4), you could select the pages in the palette then option-click the appropriate master. That should apply it immediately.


0

I don't know what resolution you need in the final print, but 500-700 cm is one heck of an output file, and you apparently have several gigabytes of data to concatenate. If Illustrator started to grind on 2.5% of your files, I'd say there is too much vector information for it to render quickly on screen, so you may have success in wireframe mode. One ...



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