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1

This is the way I've done it. Select All then Edit>Recolor Artwork. There is a Folder Icon on the top right of the panel. This will create a Swatch Group of all the used Colors. Cancel this panel unless you would like to merge colors etc. Delete the other colors in the swatch. Good Luck. Edit: If you have 2 very similar blacks the Edit Colors panel ...


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With no art selected, you can highlight a swatch and use Select > Same > Fill & Stroke to find what objects used that swatch. You can also use Select All Unused from the Swatch Panel Menu which will highlight the unused swatches. Note this tends to leave behind an orange and a green due to their use in Symbols. Brushes, symbols etc which use a ...


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150 ppi is plenty of resolution if you're printing on canvas. If you expect your piece to be viewed from a few inches away (less than 16), then 300 ppi is more than sufficient. Beyond that point you're just adding to the file size without adding visible image information in the final product. On high-grade art paper, you can go as high as 600 ppi. Beyond ...


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This is indeed a printed effect. I have a physical sample of my company logo printed on a book cover using this same effect to the degree that it is raised almost 1.5mm above the surface. photoslive.com are able to do the same - but i have not been able to determine what equipment is used.


4

CMYK. The Pantone matching system is a print production ink system. Print production always uses CMYK as a basis. Pantone colors have absolutely no basis in the RGB spectrum.


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Create a new document that is 30" x 40" Open the original document Select everything on the page (Ctl/Cmd-A) and copy (Ctl/Cmd-C) Switch to the new document and paste (Ctl/Cmd-V). Everything will be selected at this point, and the artwork will be centered on the new page. Don't click anywhere on the document or you'll deselect all of some of the objects. ...


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There were a problems with older vesions of InDesign and exporting to PDF in cases, when transparency effects are used in document. That also includes filters on objects. So I'm guessing that your damaged text is actually rasterised image, not a vector letters. To avoid such errors the only way was to put the text on different layer, not the same as used for ...


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Changing the colour of the text to a grey colour: 0,0,0,86 Fixed this issue.


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Very large format artwork, such as for billboards, is always scaled for several reasons. One is that the major design tools -- Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, have maximum document dimensions that can be too small to work the largest sizes at full scale. The common output format, PDF, also has dimension restrictions that won't allow full scale ...


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I would talk to someone at the Print Company. The grain or grainy effect is mostly caused from the screening from the actual printer. I have been dealing with this same issue with a client of mine. The drop shadow has been coming out "grainy" and there is not a gradual shift in the tone. I spoke with the company and have now about 6 proofs of adjustments ...


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I think you should use resolution from 150-200 dpi depends on how far you would stand to look at it. If you have a vector file, you wouldn't have problem to enlarge it. However, you must consider your image source when you used raster image in your banner. Hope it could help!


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Somewhere between 72dpi and 1200 dpi depending on: the type of art (photographic versus type) distance a typical person would be viewing it from quality/type of printer creating it. 300 is usually a safe bet, but we really can't give you any specific answer without knowing the details. I'd suggest talking to the vendor that is printing it for you.


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I would agree that making the switch is a little daunting at first but it's a good idea to learn these ropes I suppose. From a print point of view you sound clear on what you're working with. Check your Font license to see if you are able to share and distribute the Font to the printer, worst case is Outline the Font, however please don't hold me accountable ...


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I would take a look at this site. http://www.vigc.org/standard-preflight-profiles/ These Profiles that are free to use are great for starting out understanding preflight and different methods that are used in the industry. I use one of them most of the time for Sheetfed CMYK. I have used some of these profiles to get Clients started looking at preflight and ...


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Apex gave a valid option to get around this. IN CASE YOU HAVE ADOBE ILLUSTRATOR: What I would do is to export a PDF and then place it in illustrator into an Artboard the same size, then if you try and print from illustrator you will realize that you can span the preview window to chose which part you want to print.


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You could try "printing" the tiled document from InDesign to a PDF file, then you'll have a PDF file with multiple pages, and you can choose whichever you want to actually print, and send that one to the printer. NOTE: "Printing" to a PDF file can mess with your colors a little see this answer.


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The same way you'd export any print-destined file. Export as single page, PDF/X-1a with bleeds and marks. Be aware, you really want large inner margins for any type of spiral or comb binding. And spanning images across the gutter may result in misaligned images. It's generally not a great idea to span across the gutter when spiral or comb binding.


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I don't know if there is a way to automate it, I haven't needed to research that myself, but you can save each one individually in the Save As menu:


3

Illustrator is a vector illustration tool. Vector files are resolution agnostic--meaning a ppi resolution is irrelevant in this case. Send them the .ai files or a PDF created from the .ai file and that should be fine. If you are using raster effects, then set them to 150. No harm in going a bit higher than the spec. Remember that large format printing ...


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Disclaimer: I have no experience printing on plastic bottles like this, but I can offer some insight as someone working in the printing industry. I was wondering if there is anyway to ensure accuracy in color output from my side. I thought choosing Pantone is the safest way to get the correct color. It could be the safest way, assuming that your ...


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I think the issue is you want something durable for outdoor condition and something easy to remove. It doesn't really work that way. Anything easy to remove won't stand up to harsh environments. There are Static Films you can print on, but even that won't hold up very well outside. Here's a nice comparison of Vinyl Decals and Static Clings: ...


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The fact of the matter is that you're printing on a colour laser printer that has just about the same resolution as a mid-level mid-1990s inkjet printer. It is incapable of producing photographic-quality continuous-tone images. The printer's maximum resolution is only 600 by 1200 fixed-sized dots per inch, with only four available toner colours. If your ...


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Choosing or getting the printhouse to select the right stock is important, different papers (and inks/print method) get different results, there is a minimum visible print size, but I doubt that was the issue - in all cases get a proof of the print job and make the supplier stick to it, they dont want you to be disappointed so offering you the help you ...


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I think Bart Arondson is right: you probably have way too many samples/vector points. Let's say you're plotting every sample of an mp3 with a 44.1kHz sample rate. This means that for every second of audio, you will end up with 44,100 vector points. One second of audio would result in a vector point every 6.3mm on a 7 meter banner. Longer audio would only ...


1

Anything that is created as a vector shape in Photoshop is scalable as long as it remains a vector shape. But you have to keep in mind that it will NOT be a vector shape if you make the layer a Smart Object or if you place the PSD into any other application. In both cases, the result will be rasterized and will look pixelated if scaled up. Be sure to Save ...


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A more-or-less hidden quirk of InDesign (and all Adobe applications) is that it considers 1 pixel == 1 point. If you export directly to PDF, you'll get a print document that is 1600 points x 900 points. You can set up an alternate layout that has the page size you need (either within the same document or separately) with all content linked back to your ...


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If you're using CC-2014 I would suggest setting the InDesign document up as print (A4 document setup): after completing your designs I would go to File > Export (cmd+E) and choose a format of Adobe PDF (Interactive): then you will be prompted for the settings: There are some tutorials on how to create an interactive PDF but you could edit the ...



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