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1

The card printer asks that all images be at 300dpi, the industry standard for printing. Well, it's not an industry standard as much as a typical rule of thumb for printing photos at actual size. 300dpi is a decent print quality for that. But it's a really low resolution for flat line art or type--so it really depends on the type of art you're working ...


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How should I communicate to the designer that I need their native files for prepress purposes ONLY? Is that even acceptable? We have missed deadlines in the past for our clients because their designer cannot make the needed changes in time, or does it incorrectly, or not at all. I do not know many designers who will hand off their native files ...


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Are those homeless people able to easily navigate through numbers and other encoding? I propose to replace these solid labels+numbers (that now overlap the actual distinguishable location on a map) with simple points and lines leading out of there to each item in the list: And list items, in their turn, are to be organized: a) into category groups; or ...


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We need to understand how a user will utilize this map. Will a person be looking up a place by name (in which case the alphabetized list makes sense) or by location (in which case everything should be sorted by number) or some other way (maybe by categorization?) I'd also ask some questions: is there significance between black roads and green roads? is ...


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I can't speak for everyone, but I generally have no issue providing files for press. I do not provide native files to clients for free. Perhaps the issue is the client is your middle-man. Any client asking for files is met with a pretty standard "they aren't free, see the contract" response. Any press house asking for files is treated differently. If you ...


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Your map is busy for three reasons: you have too many gray lines which clutter up the background, your labels are crowding all the white space, and you are "zoomed out" too far. Take out every road or transit line which isn't necessary. That will reduce some of the line density. Remove the labels from this map. Put them on the other side of the paper, on a ...


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You may want to do some research on the differences between RGB and CMYK colors. Your screen is in RGB and your printed design is (usually) CMYK. I say "usually" because some printers use PMS, which allows for more vivid colors than CMYK, but neither will look as vivid as your RGB design does on-screen. If you know that you are designing for print, ...


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In addition to creating your own printer marks or page info, the Registration swatch can be very handy in creating masks. Often a mask consisting of only K will not completely mask a CMYK object. So, using Registration for the mask "black" tends to be more complete. It's not very easy to see in InDesign specifically, but "feather" effects utilize the ...


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You're right that it's a little superfluous, especially because InDesign will add any printer marks during export. Registration black is really for adding any custom printer marks or page info. Because registration black will use 100% CMYK for each value, that's 400% ink coverage and should obviously be used in small quantities. Hope that helps?


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Yes. Actually, you end up with a tad bit over 1000ppi. Just be certain to uncheck "Resample" in the Image Size dialog of Photoshop. Assuming you're using Photoshop.


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Your problem is most likely your output to the printer fails to provide the fonts. Your printer is simply rasterizing the font from the preview image stored. I would guess you aren't providing a PDF? PDFs solve this problem fairly well by allowing you to embed the font information. The other way around this is to convert your fonts to curves (vectors) if you ...


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The color space of the artwork wouldn't affect the clarity, only the vibrancy and appearance of colors. This sounds more to me like your ads are not created at a high enough resolution. If your ads are mostly text-based, you may want to see if your designer can provide you with vector versions of the ads. If not, ask for 300 dpi CMYK images, typically in ...


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You can check with your printer or online printer for guidelines/templates depending on the size postcard you are designing for Direct Mail. Any post office will tell you if your PC will work if you take a sample to them. For a 4x6 PC with a mailing panel you can see the attached for reference. I have done thousands of DM pieces and have always stuck with ...


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In the wikipedia article on spot color: In offset printing, a spot color is any color generated by an ink (pure or mixed) that is printed using a single run. [CMYKOG...] The two additional spot colors are added to compensate for the ineffective reproduction of faint tints using CMYK colors only. However, offset technicians around the world use ...


3

It would depend on a few factors. The best solution would be for you to contact the printer and select a paper, trim size, and quantity and they can help you with the spine thickness measurement. Some printers even have auto generating templates that will ask you a few questions like this and can be able to output your measurements and even generate a ...


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Do not trust the on-screen display of a print-ready .pdf. Ever. Seriously, any and all .pdf viewers have huge problems rendering print-ready .pdfs on-screen. One of the common rendering errors is indeed with hairlines between areas of different opacity, or intersected by areas of different opacity or blending. Mostly, these hairlines are artefacts of the ...


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Yes, each printing systems uses a color sheme to print. Some can use several shemes, some can only use one. Best system for printing is cmyk. Okay, let's try it with an example. Supose you have a pdf file which has included two images. The pdf file uses for example cmyk, one image too, the other maybe rgb. A printing house uses usually a special ...


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Easy solution, export artwork as a JPEG with maximum quality.


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You should be aware that pixels do not equal print centimetres at all. There are many factors in play in this specific problem, but mainly you should start by setting your canvas to a print size, and specify it in the final medium you want to print on. If you're aiming towards a DIN A4 document, the size es 210mm wide by 297mm tall. Resolution also plays a ...


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Most of these are questions you need to ask the printer of the billboard. As for the questions we can answer: I saw that many people suggest using of inDesign when combining vector and raster, but why i can't do it in Illustrator as well? You can if you want to. Personal preference. (Unless, again, the printer has a preference) When i convert text ...


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It seems like you may have one rgb document and one cmyk document. Convert them both to cmyk and the color will probably be closer


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This has been something that print designers have been dealing with all the time. What I do is to output in cmyk pdf format and send that to the client. I also mention that the colors they see will not match that of the final print. If they are concerned about the final colors then you can provide a proof from your printer, most likely digital, since most ...


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As stated by Joonas I would use InkScape. If you are set on using Gimp you may consider a different ratio instead of 1:1. I would consult the printer with their desired specs and we do have some questions similar to this topic you may find helpful: Should I design business cards in InDesign, Illustrator or Photoshop? What should you ask the printer? What ...


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The colon isn't essential, in my view, because you wouldn't use it in a conventional sentence where you ran the bullet points together separated by semi-colons. Bullet points are used to replace semi-colons. To use the example above: (you would use a colon here) When arriving at a convention, you should check in; pick up the welcome kit; and pick up ...


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Under "Effect"-tab you're able to enhance the documents resolution in "Document Raster Effect Settings" if I've translated it correctly from Dutch...


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Is it possible to print duotone gradient images using two pantone neon colors? Yes. What should I be aware of and be careful with when preparing the image? You should be aware that there's no way to reproduce the exact colors short of printing it. So you'll want to set up your file, but be on site for the press check to ensure it's what you're ...


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Inkscape is the best graphic design for beginners software to use; when I first started to learn graphic design that's the program I did use and still use at this moment, because it's easy to use, it's fast and it's free plus it creates vector images.


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Open the .pdf in Photoshop, ensuring the dimensions are correct and you've set the PPI field to at least 300 in the open dialog: Let Photoshop rasterize the entire thing. Then save the file as a tiff. Print the Tiff. Vector graphics are beneficial when artwork is scaled and manipulated. When it comes to printing everything is rasterized upon output. ...


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You want to use .PDF or .TIF. .TIF is mostly for high resolution, but raster, logos. For anything else more photographic in nature, say an isolated car or isolated person you'll be better off using .PDF for the transparency. Select transparency when saving the tif:



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