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34

It's one of the Big Things You Must Know about printing that Black (0,0,0,100) is not black; it is a dark gray. I mean really important, as in "If you don't know this, you're going to get in expensive trouble sooner or later." The reason it's gray, rather than black, is that the ink is partially absorbed by the paper and is in any case a very thin coating, ...


30

I like the accepted answer, it has good advice, but I thought I'd expand on it a bit. For wall sized graphics and large banners (e.g 3m x 5m), what is an acceptable PPI/DPI for print. Here's definitions, so we know what we're talking about. DPI = Dots per inch = units used to measure the resolution of a printer LPI = Lines per inch = The offset ...


21

I know this sounds a stupid question, black is black right? Not really. It all depends on colour model used, ambient light, substrate, and perception. Black is, by definition, no light hitting our eyes. This is very difficult to accomplish. :) CMYK is a Subtractive Colour Model. It is used in printing because the mixing of the different pigments of ink ...


19

In general you should use vector graphics in the artwork wherever practical, and deliver final artwork to the printer in PDF or other vector format. Your finished print will then be limited only by the output resolution of the print device. This is particularly important with text and line art -- visible rasterization in the finished print will be very ...


19

To answer the first question: you want a printer who says they can do white. It's not a matter of 5-color printing, it's more whether that printer does that kind of thing. As you can tell from a look at the Pantone swatch book, there is no white ink in conventional printing. The translucency of the few whites that are available makes them unsuitable for ...


17

Ask them if they have a template? At our print shop we offer a full template selection that allows designers to enter in their desired output and it will email them a template file. We did this because many questions and files we received proved to be an issue in regards to accurate bleed, trim, and non-print elements. What black do you guys print? ...


13

It is not as standard as one would hope of. The common aspect ratios range from 1.423 to 1.8. For the most ID cards and credit cards ID-1 from ISO/IEC 7810 (wikipedia) standard tells the dimensions, which are 85.60 × 53.98 mm (3.370 × 2.125 in) and aspect ratio is 1.586. This is also the standard business card size in many situations as it is highly ...


13

During the RGB ⇒ CMYK conversion your RGB(0,0,0) values are probably converted to Rich black = CMYK(63,52,51,100) or such; and looks washed out when compared to Plain black = CMYK(0,0,0,100) Solution is to fine tune the RGB ⇒ CMYK conversion.* See also: Rich black versus plain black and gd.se question: What is the difference between CMYK and RGB? *) To ...


12

In Offset printing the fifth colour is an additional spot colour, which could be anything (of course depending on the printer/printer services). I've yet to hear what is the single most common "fifth colour". Why? For example in (now discontinued) hexachrome (CMYKOG, yes 6 colours) printing process orange and green were added to achieve wider colour gamut ...


12

What you might be missing here is that most professional printing involves printing on oversize sheets which are cut down to the required size. The final artwork you supply contains 'crop marks' - these indicate where the printed oversize sheet should be cut down to produce the finished page. Output of these marks is normally automated by your software. As ...


12

In addition to other answers, specific questions For advertising... What is the live area of the advertisement? Advertising is sold in "spaces". Many refer to things such as "half-page" or "quarter-page". These ambiguous terms mean nothing to a designer. Exact measurements need to be be acquired in order to properly configure the size of any ...


12

Two considerations I'm aware of: Misregistration Assuming this is based on overlaid inks (e.g. CMYK) not premixed inks (e.g. Pantone spot colours), it's not a bad idea to try to minimise the number of inks used in the colours in thin or high detail areas such as thin lines and fine text. This is because for fine lines, tiny registration errors ...


11

Specific to screen printing What type of inks do you have available? Plastisol, water-based, solvent-based... The type of ink used will have an effect on the appearance, the texture of the print, and how durable it will be. Don't hesitate to ask for a printed sample of what they've got available. Do you you use any ink matching systems? Pantone Solid ...


10

Standard US and European paper sizes have different origins, both with deep historical roots, but you'll have a relatively hard (and relatively expensive) time finding US Legal paper stock in Europe or A4 in the US. Even in the US, the standard legal size is increasingly rare and much more expensive. The UK may still have "Foolscap", which was standard there ...


9

I think the only real con is your limited color space. And that isn't necessarily a huge con... Some great designers have embraced the photocopier. One that comes to mind is Art Chantry who, IMHO, is just as responsible for the Seattle Grunge scene as Nirvana was: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Art_Chantry Granted, that's a particular aesthetic that may ...


9

Switch to LaTeX. It offers: High quality typography without knowing much about the "behind-the-scenes" on how does it work. Text is of course justified by default, that is how it should be, it is as well properly hyphenated to avoid long spaces. Packages (extensions) for various things, including for instance listings text files (such as source codes), ...


8

In printing, a spot colour is an ink that is premixed to the colour required and printed from a dedicated plate, rather than being simulated by overprinting dots of ink from the cyan, magenta, yellow and black plates (4 colour CMYK process). It may be a colour which cannot be achieved in CMYK, such as metallic or neon. It may be a colour that is achievable ...


8

Welcome to what is probably the Number 1 'gotcha' for people new to print design :-) and yes, people who encounter it for the first time not pre-warned almost always run into just before a deadline... RGB black is simple. It's just no light coming from the screen. CMYK black isn't simple. There's black ink (the 'K' in CMYK), but even with 100% black ink, ...


7

Koiyu's answer would fit if you are talking about sending to a printing press, but I suspect you're outputting to an inkjet printer. In that case, the answer is almost the opposite, because there is no CMYK conversion involved. I'm going to assume that your screen grab is genuinely black. You can check that in Photoshop, as JAG2007 describes, but a screen ...


7

Grande format resolutions, as various folks have pointed out, depend on viewing distance. Several answers refer to line screens, but technology has moved on. Very few, if any, grande format jobs are printed that way, and in any case, none of the answers indicated how to translate from PPI (dots) resolution in Photoshop to LPI (lines of dots at different ...


7

The short answer is that the PNG is a low-resolution raster image. The long answer is that it looks good on the screen because it is being rendered at 1 pixel per pixel, but when you attempt to print it, the printed version is actually scaling up. Printed color images look good at 300 dpi. You don't specify the pixel dimension of the png, but if your logo ...


7

If the printer is asking for 600dpi, it means [he] either didn't understand the question or there has been a failure to communicate. 600dpi (dots per inch) is the resolution at which your billboard will be printed. There was a time, in the Long Long Ago, when that would have been considered pretty high-resolution stuff -- I remember having posters printed ...


7

It will be inkjet printed, so 300 ppi will give you plenty of quality. If the file size on disk gets excessive, 150 ppi would also be fine, but for a seating chart that's unlikely to be an issue. Export to ("Save As...") PDF using "High Quality Print" as the preset, and you'll be fine for printing at your local FedEx/Kinko, etc., or on a desktop printer if ...


7

On spot blacks Many of the other posters have discussed parameters for rich blacks in process colour. It's also worth noting that you can mix spot blacks (and other spot colours in fact) with process colour in documents. For example, it is common practice to print text in a spot black ink on a process colour document. Process black ink is intentionally ...


7

Overprint preview in Illustrator somewhat works. In Illustrator, you can draw a rectangle which matches your stock color. Place it on a layer below all other layers and lock it. Use the Attributes Panel in Illustrator to set subsequent objects to overprint. Then in the View menu, choose Overprint Preview. Unfortunately, this same method doesn't ...


6

Actually, using an offset printer will get you better quality and still save your ink cartridges. The only way to get truly consistent blacks is to get them done professionally; an inkjet or laster printer will often give you blotchy or inconsistent large areas of solid color simply because of the way they're done. You can also ensure that you're getting ...


6

This is a difficult question. What you are asking for is a checklist which includes the set of everything. The answer is really "no" there is no checklist, and "no" fancy DTP software will not help you: DTP software is designed to be open ended and non-rigid. That said, your ideal checklist is going to be the specific template guidelines and a list of all ...


6

Short answer: you can't. Technical answer: RGB is additive. The more color (made of light) you add, the closer you get to white. CMYK is subtractive. The more color (made of ink, which is reflective, which subtracts light) you add, the closer you get to black (or actually a muddy brown). CMYK has a smaller range, or gamut, of colors it can reproduce than ...


6

Ink cracking is very common and is always an issue if the paper is not previously run through a scoring or creasing process. The problem is low ink penetration. The ink is just a coat on the paper. It does not really wet it and that makes it crack on the surface. The cracking is even more pronounced on digital non-offset prints. Your example has less ...


6

Is there a recommended way to do this The recommended way is to not do that. The client is hiring the graphic designer for their skills and making decisions like that. If you're just letting the client randomly pick elements of your design, you're not a designer...you're merely an assistant. If you must print out a bunch of fonts, install them all, ...



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