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17

Why not just go to a print shop that supports this, like moo.com -- they allow you to do a range of business cards/postcards with small print runs, and differing images on one side (notionally the front). I had some printed by their UK branch recently for a project I'm working on, and have been overjoyed with the quality.


14

Talk to the production house and ask them what rich black they prefer. There is no single rich black every print provider uses. Each print provider has their own formula for a rich black. And, in many cases, the print provider may want simply 100% K and they will adjust the black to match their own environment. Therefore, the best option is to ask the print ...


8

It's called a Halftone From Wikipedia: Halftone is the reprographic technique that simulates continuous tone imagery through the use of dots, varying either in size, in shape or in spacing. "Halftone" can also be used to refer specifically to the image that is produced by this process. It is used to produce the appearance of continuous tone images in ...


7

RGB is an additive spectrum... you ADD colors to get white. Dkuntz is correct stating that RGB is light-based. It is. It uses the visible light spectrum to display colors. CMYK is a subtractive spectrum... you REMOVE color to get white. DKuntz's use of the term "color-based theory" is really nonsensical. Since RGB is also a color spectrum. A more ...


7

It's actually far simpler than it may first appear. The bottom line is that it's best to convert to the most native format as early as possible. Full colour printing typically uses four inks to create a photorealistic image. In theory, cyan, magenta and yellow should be enough to print a high quality image, but adding black aids the printing process, giving ...


6

If you intend to print them yourself, does it have to be done with PDF? I have used Photoshop myself to create a front and back image to print multiple business cards on cardstock with my own printer. I usually create the business card image itself in two PSD files, one for the front, one for the back, in exactly the right dimensions to print with some ...


6

Alan Gilbertson is going to stop by any moment and join me in a rousing chorus of "Ask your printer." :) As far as I know, standard business cards would physically be printed the same way no matter what the orientation of the type, but if your printer is requesting information, your best bet is to ask your printer what they need the information for and ...


6

Firstly, when you change color modes, you should use Photoshop's Edit->Convert to profile function. This will allow you to map the colors to the new profile in the least-obtrusive way. This should prevent the logo or other asset from noticeably changing colors. Secondly, the reason people do print designs in CMYK is precisely because it allows them to work ...


6

Looks like a bad laser print from the 90's and blunt cutting machine. Generally next time you set up the file, it's a good idea to include what you call "bleed". This is where you extend the image or background color to be a tiny bit larger than the inteded finished size. For cards it is usually 2-3mm extra. Check with the specific printer if they have a ...


6

I cannot guarantee that any of my suggestions would result in a better print, but here are some things that stick out to me: Design in vector whenever possible There is nothing in the design that you've posted that cannot be saved as a vector. It looks like the jagged lines in "printing detail 5" are a result of providing raster art instead of vector. ...


6

You are talking about microprinting. The whole idea of that, is that you cannot reproduce it by using printers or printing presses. It is engraving that are designed to trip up professional counterfeiters. So, no, I canĀ“t see how on earth it would be possible to pull off. (of course, if you have unlimited resources and good connections in shady parts of town ...


5

Not to detract from Marc's excellent and comprehensive answer, there are some points that are worth a bit more explanation. It's a big subject. This gets geeky before it gets better, so bear with me and follow closely. :) CMYK and RGB are "color models," not color profiles. A color model is a way to represent colors using numbers. There are other models, ...


5

Acrobat X does not install a print driver on the Mac to the best of my knowledge. Acrobat Stopped installing the PDF printer driver at version 9 on the Mac due to how Apple built in the PDF saving. I believe your first link is referring to a Windows system since the Mac OS has PDF saving built into the OS print dialogs (as shown in your second link). All ...


5

I suspect this came about by working in RGB to start with, then converting to CMYK. This would turn your RGB(0,0,0) text into a colour composed of all four CMYK channels, rather than pure 100% K. As Marc and Scott say, body text should be 100% K. (If you did need a stronger black, you's be better of going for a double hit of the black plate rather than ...


5

Cyan is one of the four primaries used in CMYK, or four-color process printing. Cyan is NOT used in formulation of any PANTONE spot color. The shading of Cyan is defined under ISO 2846-1. PANTONE CYAN refers to Pantone's representation of Cyan, which is found in the following products only: PANTONE COLOR BRIDGE PANTONE CMYK COLOR GUIDE


5

I work for the company that appears to be your client. These are internal color codes that do not correspond to any color system, RGB, CMYK, etc. As has been suggested, you should ask for the corresponding color system info. 71R Volt is a standard fluorescent yellow. 00A Black is standard black. You can google for most of these colors (just put in the name ...


4

Duplex printing is a function of your printer and it's associated drivers and software. Indesign simply prints pages. It is the printer's job to duplex them if it has that capability. The Brother MFC-J6910DW specifications do state it will duplex. You simply need to tick the option in the print dialog. THere should be an option for "2-Sided" or "Duplex" in ...


4

You can do it with scripting. I've tried an tested this script in InDesign CS5 on a Mac, What you need to do is Select which text box you want the students' name to go in Then under the 'layers' panel, expand the layer it is in, and change the name of the text box by slow double clicking it, and enter "NAME" Copy and paste the script below in notepad or ...


4

"STACK" is a programming term used to describe functions currently in use to accomplish a particular task. Postscript, the technology behind PDFs, is a programming language in its own right. But unless you are a programmer who understands Postscript, that will do little to help troubleshoot the error. I would say that something happened when the PDF was ...


4

Well this sort results can be achieved through Die Cutting. How we do DieCutting The cut is made using a special die shaped as the design. The die has sharp metal strips placed into a CNC cut block. The printed sheet is pressed onto the die using a high pressure roller which punches out the desired shape. This works alot like a "cookie cutter". for more ...


4

Obviously you're limited by the equipment you have at your disposal, but have you considered CMYK screen printing? You will need a 4 color press with precise registration, but it is entirely possible to do: CMYK Screen Printing Consumer level wide format inkjet printers are available if you're looking to buy one, in my experience Epson is generally regarded ...


4

There are commercial inks that you would need a business licence and tax form to obtain. Since you may be using it for home use you would typically be getting a water based ink. The best option for you may be going to Hobby Lobby. They do have "do it yourself" home screening kits. Example here and white here From experience they are typically not ...


4

You need to use Photoshop. You should never blur the image it will just make it look bad. Use the Offset filter Filter>other>offset to nudge the image so that the edge of the tiling is in the editable area. From there you need to paint/clone out the seams before using the offset filter again to return the image back to its original position. Example of an ...


4

Any book or booklet printed must have a page count divisible by 4 at a minimum. You have a left page and right page on the front, and a left page and right page on the back, totaling 4 pages. This is called a signature. A signature is one sheet of stock/paper with many pages (or folios) on it. When the signature is folded and/or cut it creates the proper ...


4

In terms of spatial resolution, the analogue of DPI in offset printing is lines per inch (LPI). This describes how fine or coarse the halftone screen is. The greater the LPI, the more fine the details that can be represented in the printed image (and also, the higher the DPI that is required in the source file if you are starting from a digital image; rule ...


4

Stock shifts and moves in minor amounts on a trimmer. You can not guarantee absolute precision when trimming. With a good reproduction house, variations are very minute. With an online print vendor, you can expect bigger variations - not necessarily in overall trim size, but in trim locations. If precise trim position is imperative, I would certainly ...


4

The best workflow I've used that addresses this problem is the use of a duplicated guide file. On a high level, you are duplicating an image, applying layer adjustments to the smaller image, and then scaling those adjustments to the master file. Pros: You can work faster and lightweight, there is less crashes, easier modifications. Cons: You can't modify ...


3

PDFs support fillable form fields, so this is pretty easy to do in Acrobat. But if you want to use InDesign, you typically need to design the form, then use Acrobat to replace the placeholder elements with actual form fields. This page describes the workflow. Luckily, as mentioned on the same page, Acrobat 9 has an automatic form field detection feature. ...


3

If I were you, I would try to profile the lamination process. The photo SE site has a good description, as well as this site. Basically, what you do is as follows: Find a service which will allow you to profile your printer. Print a test photo of some kind as they recommend, and then laminate it as you normally would. Send in the test print to said ...


3

Akin to what Stan Rogers was referring to: if you are doing a small-run (of 1), with a design that isolates text, you can use a metal foil that is designed to adhere to laser toner. Basically, you place the foil on the already printed text and use an iron to heat it. This remelts the laser printer toner and causes the foil to stick to it. Some cases, you can ...



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