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Yes. That's generally the accepted difference. Pro Bono, meaning "for public good" would be along the lines of designing posters for an anti-drug campaign in schools. Or Anti-smoking literature for non-profit groups like the American Outreach Association (which don't actually sell a product or service). Essentially, if the project is geared towards helping ...


4

I think Scott's answer is valid and one way to look at it. I'd use a slightly different explanation. Whether it's spec or pro-bono work, you're not getting paid, and someone is benefiting from your work (at least, there's a perceived benefit). The difference is that with pro-bono, the project is treated as a proper project. There's a schedule, there's a ...


3

DA01 is correct; there's almost no way to transition gracefully and resentment-free from pro bono to paid with the same clients. Possibly if you made a big splash about starting your own company, with a suite of stationery and a website and a literal shingle outside your door, and used that as a way to say that you can no longer afford to do volunteer work ...


2

You also raise the question of 'when' to transition, which is an important aspect to consider. Four questions that you may want to think about come to my mind: 1) is your portfolio good enough to attract paid work? Do you have evidence of that? 2) does the 'free' work you provide add increasing value to your portfolio? 3) does the 'free' work help you ...



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