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13

I used Scribus recently on a personal project. For an OS GD app, it's quite impressive. I'd definitely put it above PageMaker in terms of usability and features. that said, it's far from finished and does have some annoying quirks (such as you can't undo text edits). InDesign is pretty high end, but for personal, smaller project, Scribus might be just ...


5

IF it's a Quark 4 file, you can open it directly in InDesign. Otherwise you can try Q2ID from Markzware. It's pricey ($199); I've never used it, although I've heard good reports. Beyond that, you'll have to recreate it somehow.


5

I haven't seen a QuarkXpress file in 8-10 years. When I do see a QuarkXpress file, I simply use the Q2ID plug in and convert it to Indesign. But that's my office. QuarkXpress is very much still in use for large production houses where they've been using it for 15+ years. Essentially if a business, or designer, started before the development of Adobe ...


4

Scribus is promising but I haven't found it to be comparable to InDesign or other page layout programs. Perhaps I'm missing something in the export options, but it seems to be quite difficult to find the right menus in order to produce a high resolution, print-ready file. Perhaps if I used it more often I would find it to be more useful, but going from ...


4

According to the Wikipedia article, the last reliable report on marketshare for the 2 products was in 2004. It stated that Quark was 8 times more popular than InDesign. As 2004 was almost a decade ago I'd have a tenancy to believe ID has eroded that substantially. When I was going through school from 99-01 they were still teaching Quark, but even then I ...


3

Quark is all but dead. I have worked in Prepress for over 15 years. Up until about 6 years ago Quark totally dominated as far as the files that crossed my desk. Now I will be lucky (or unlucky) to see 2 Quark jobs a month. I used to praise the merits of Quark (over Pagemaker, yuck!) but now Indesign just makes my job so much easier. My advise to anyone doing ...


3

Short answer: No. It's mostly a legacy application in environments where a significant workflow investment was made long ago. Newspaper and some other publishing environments are the only scenarios I've run into. I think they're coming to the end of that road as well. QXP doesn't have much time left on it's publishing life support system.


3

It's tricky to make a recommendation. You say "booklet", which implies a small project, but I assume if it's successful you won't stop at one. Here's the thing: no matter what software you use, you're faced with a significant investment of time learning to use the application, and from a practical standpoint I consider that a very important consideration. ...


2

Yes, absolutely. Either of those programs will give you complete flexibility over where you put the diagrams and how they're sized, how the text does or doesn't wrap around them, the font and indents of the code sections, headers and footers, how pages break, and so forth. Word is for writing letters and legal documents, not for page layout. Illustrator ...


2

While Indesign or XPress would be decent tools to use.... Actually, for text books and manuals I highly recommend Adobe Framemaker. Few have ever heard of Frammaker but it's been around for many, mnay years. It's specifically designed to handle book content that has a great many internal references and call outs such as technical manuals.


2

I've used an prefer InDesign for book layouts (300+ pages). The Page Masters, Paragraph/Character Styles, and grep styles are pretty easy to use and provide great control of your formatting. I advise setting up your master pages and styles before getting to far on the project to be able to most efficiently apply your formatting. As Mentioned ...


2

It's simple in inDesign to create same effect: Step 1 Step 2


2

I am not a designer but I have worked in publishing and seen the wonders of Quark. Scribus is a stone knife that may one day evolve into an electronic publishing. But for now it is maddeningly non-intuitive. My one suggestion to its developers is: Try to anticipate the basic objectives of the entry level user. For example if someone wants to put words ...


2

I don't believe so. Publish/subscribe works the other way around. If corrections are made to the original, the XPress file is updated when opened. I don't believe any layout app sends data back to the original file.


2

This is not possible in InDesign. As user568458 commented, it can be done with Illustrator. It can also be done with Photoshop. However, InDesign simply doesn't offer any halftone effects.


2

You can use Convert Quark to Indesign. It's £3 a conversion. I use it it I need to convert single Quark files every now and again. Spreads to cost of buying the software as well! :)


2

Print design is a slower moving beast than interactive/web design. Many print shops are fine with their prepress setups even though they may be 5 years old or even older. While the industry is now dominated by Adobe, there was a time when Quark dominated the prepress/print industry, and a lot of that technology is likely still sticking around (and note ...


2

Being an 'all DTP tolls minitechnicus' it was easy for me ..I mean it took a very little amount of time to accommodate well with Scribus. My tool of choice for years was PageMaker then InDesign - I know QuarkXpress also - but I feel that Scribus is no more no less than just ok. Far from perfection but ok - you can do your job. Sure - many things could ...


1

Sorry, I'm with Scott in my QXP rustiness. But I used to be a master ... In the old days (QXP4), you could select the pages in the palette then option-click the appropriate master. That should apply it immediately.


1

Quark have support documents / manuals on their website for download, e.g. shortcut lists, which you might want to make use of, especially if you last worked with versions before 8.0: http://quark.com/Support/Documentation/QuarkXPress/ What you seem to look for is how to insert the New Column or New Text Box special character to let subsequent text continue ...


1

As the publisher of a church monthly "newsletter" (actually a 32-page booklet), I can't afford Quark or Indesign. Of several low-cost DSP programs, Scribus has been the best. But presently, a new update has made it very frustrating. One has to set a default font for the entire document, and then fight for every other font he wants to use. But they'll get ...


1

One of the non-obvious features of InDesign is that ANY path, open or closed, can be a text container. You can create whatever shape you need, click on it with the text tool and start typing (or paste in the text). Conversely, any text frame is a path. When you draw out a text frame with the Type tool (Xpress users tend to draw a frame, then select the ...


1

"What's the best software for writing" That's a much different question than what the best question for page/document/book layout is. For writing, it's your personal preference. Whichever word processor gives you the features and flexibility needed to write. As long as it can export into a file format that a page layout software can use, you should be good ...


1

I truly despise Microsoft Word from a pre-press standpoint, but I have to disagree with the comment above. If you are an advanced user with Microsoft Word it can be a very useful program to create multiple page technical documents. Sometimes I actually prefer to use Microsoft Word based on it's integration with Excel and chart input. I love InDesign/Quark ...



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