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9

The answer is to create your logo artwork as vector rather than raster graphics. You can then use this artwork directly for print work, or export raster artwork at the size you need for web graphics. While Photoshop has some vector support, if you have Creative Suite, Illustrator is the tool for the job. If you don't, then Inkscape (which is free) is worth ...


8

In inkscape, you count on sort of Potrace(an excelent tracer, free) embedded there. Just go to top Path menu, vectorize. I've played quite with its settings, and while you won't get total control you can reduce it to quite an accurate result and few nodes. But you need to play a lot with the settings till you find the right ones for you. It worked for me for ...


8

I'd say there's no quick and dirty fix for choppy lines, you just gotta recreate it using vectors. The following took me 3 minutes in Photoshop with Circles and Stroke effect: I'm not going to do it all for you, but all you need is two more half circles and you've got a shape based logo, which should scale beautifully to any size. So that's 6 circles, two ...


8

e100's advice is spot on. A vector application such as Illustrator is the best tool for logo design, whether you start on paper and scan it in, or work directly within the program. This isn't the whole story, however. Scalability doesn't just involve vectors; the detail in a logo must also be adjusted for the size of the finished artwork. Just as with ...


5

In addition to Adobe Illustrator which is clearly the gold-standard of commercial vector graphics tools, you should give some consideration to Inkscape. Inkscape is a vector drawing tool that would be an excellent chose for building scalable logo art. Inkscape is also free and runs on lots of platforms including both Windows and Mac. The key attribute of ...


5

If you go to the Accessibility control panel, you can enable a zoom mode that blows up whatever is being displayed. Using this, you can detect subpixel antialiasing because it shows up as color fringes when magnified. I tried this out and found that, yes, the Retina MacBook Pro does still use sub-pixel antialiasing (when LCD font smoothing is on). Somewhat ...


5

A Retina display is a screen with a high pixel density. Apple's marketing material defines it like so: The pixel density is so high, your eyes can’t discern individual pixels. But at a technical level, the Retina displays on the iPhone, iPod, iPad and MacBook Pro are exactly double the pixel density of the non-Retina models. This is because scaling to ...


4

The most straightforward way is to open the file in Illustrator, copy, then paste into a Photoshop document. Choose "Shape Layer" in the dialog. Less directly, you could place the file as a Smart Object (or use File > Open as Smart Object), double-click the thumbnail in the Layers Panel to open in Illustrator, then copy and paste. If you don't ...


4

No, they are not vector. They are raster and remain raster. However, upon output, the raster effects are generated to match the resolution of the output device in conjunction with the Document Raster Effects Settings as well as any scaling which may take place upon output. Make certain the Document Raster Effects Setting (in the Effects menu) is set ...


4

I have not launched Illustrator in a while, but there's one general solution: copy your shape shrink/expand it make a flow transition of shape and color between first and second shapes color first shape fully opaque white and second fully transparent white tweak intermediate shapes count and/or colors there's your inner/outer glow :)


4

You can't, at least practically speaking. An image only has so many pixels. To enlarge the photo, you either need to make the individual pixels bigger (it will be noticeably pixelated) or you need to make up extra pixels in between (it will typically be noticeably blurry). For slight enlarging, the latter is usually acceptable--especially with some careful ...


3

Tracing In case we can not easily recreate the original in a vector oriented application we may also trace the bitmap to a vector graphic. Below example was done with Inkscape where I imported the bitmap to trace it with 2 color steps: This will not preserve the exact circular geometry of the source (note the slightly wavy shapes above), as tracing was ...


3

Never rely on any print provider to do anything other than spit out your file as it currently exists. I would never trust that something will be output in a specific manner to ensure it is as I expect. If you have to provide instructions or notes on how to output, then it's a recipe for error. If you place a 25ppi image in Indesign it never gets "upsampled" ...


3

Import the Illustrator file into Photoshop as a Smart Object File > Open As Smart Object.\ Use Image > Resize with "Resample" turned on to change the width to 100cm. Be prepared to wait a long time, depending on your RAM and scratch disk (operation may fail if your system isn't up to it). Image > Mode > Greyscale Image > Mode > Bitmap Save ...


3

There's not really a problem including raster images provided you know the final output. Raster images, inside a vector app or not, always have the same limitations in terms of scaling. Placing a raster image into a vector app does not make it resolution independent. With that in mind, it's really your call. If you need infinite scalability, then you ...


3

As @horatio pointed, it's pretty normal loosing the details while zooming on a fixed size image. Assuming that the final destination of your image is a web page, when you perform a zoom operation the browser scales the raster images, usually by interpolation. If you are interested to a web page that can be zoomed, you can use directly SVG as image format ...


3

Your best approach for filesize, image quality, and flexibility will probably be a SVG with an embedded image (or two). If you size and position everything (text, image, vector graphical elements) with the SVG and then put an appropriate "viewBox" parameter on it, the SVG format will handle scaling down the images to size. If you are able to successfully ...


2

In Photoshop CS4, use File → Place and select the EPS file. This will place the EPS as a resolution independent smart object on a new layer. As a note: not all of the Twitter EPS files worked when I tried them in CS4 on Mac just now, one threw an error. Not sure if that was just an example you used or not.


2

are they all in one document? if so, you could create multiple artboards and place each object in it's own artboard. then do file / export, choose format:png and check the box for "use artboards". this will export each artboard to it's own png file. or you can try exporting layers directly using this script (I have not tested it).


2

At this order of resolution (meant as in ppi) one can drop subpixel rendering altogether without making much of a difference (difference will be almost unnoticable if at all visible). I think even hinting could be dropped and almost no harm will be done. So much pixels on an inch of length implies rather “printwise” mindset instead of traditional ...


2

Yes, it is. We sometimes use the term here. Vectorization is a valid term, but it's often reserved for when talking about tools (like live trace in Adobe Illustrator) that approximate vectors from a raster image automatically. It's not so often used for the process of adapting, re-creating, re-drawing or re-interpreting a raster image as vectors, since ...


2

Illustrator has a feature called live trace. It sounds like it would be perfect for your case. Place the source image. With the source image selected: Object > Live Trace > Make. OR Object > Live Trace > Tracing Options. Set tracing options, and then click Trace. You can then convert the tracing to paths.


2

I see two options: Trace it with the pen tool(this is a faster option but it might not be exact{unless you are really good with pen tool} and you don't end up with a lossless file) Do some research, find the font, and recreate it. ( Takes longer than option 1, but you end up with a completely lossless file that you can do anything you want with.)


2

Make sure your shape is placed on whole pixel values (ie, X:851px and not X:851,728 px) If your object is aligned to the pixel grid, antialiasing won't make it bigger. You can do this easily by selecting the option "Align to pixel grid" in the Transform panel (if you don't see it, select "show options" from the flyout menu) To do this automatically for ...


2

SVG is the only vector (it is actually XML code driven) format supported by browsers. Although it has been around for a while, it is relatively new as far as browser support goes. Like all newer techniques (HTML5, CSS3), they take a while to become mainstream. Many designers have probably yet to adopt using SVG as currently, you'd have to make a fallback ...


2

The advantages in using a traced SVG file over a compressed bitmap image in JPEG format depend much on the complexity of content. Simple objects In case we have few colors, and simple geometrical objects a traced vector image will gain clarity is scalable without losing much information, and will be smaller in size than the bitmap: Left 7.2 kB JPG ...


2

Why don't you try recreating the whole image? it's much easier. The font used up there is Arial Black (extra bold). You can then use strokes and shapes to do the rest. Hope that's useful :)


1

Photoshop does not support open vector paths. Your issue is most likely due to an open path and upon output Photoshop fills the open path creating the semi-circle. You need to draw closed shapes in Photoshop, or stroke an open path and use pixels. There's no method I'm aware of to use open paths in Photoshop, everything must be closed.


1

If you don't want to use a similar font, you could do the following in Photoshop: Grab the magic wand tool W. Bring the Tolerance down to 15 or lower Select the body of the "i" Ctrl + J (Cmd + J for Mac) to duplicate that layer The dot of the "i" would be easy Grab the Elliptical Marquee tool Move your mouse to the center of the dot Hold Alt + Shift ...


1

You're simply resizing a raster image without any interpolation. Another way to put it is that you are 'stretching the pixels'. Not sure what the better term is, but 'vector' doesn't make much sense in this context. As for your workflow, it makes sense. In theory, you should be able to stretch the image to any size you want in your page layout software ...



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