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25

You can do a lot of things with vector graphics, eventually however the vector graphics need to be rendered to pixels, rasters etc. This rendering process gets slower the more data you have. In fact 3D graphics is also a vector graphic data. 3d renders show the limitations of your rendering speed as many renders to print size take hours to do. Image 1: 3D ...


14

While vector images have many advantages, they also have shortcomings. Vector data is, in general, better suited for items which have hard edges. Vector graphics do not excel at creating soft edges areas or shapes which blend into other soft-edged shapes. Yes, you can use raster effects in many graphics applications to blur or "undefine" the edges of ...


10

I'd say there's no quick and dirty fix for choppy lines, you just gotta recreate it using vectors. The following took me 3 minutes in Photoshop with Circles and Stroke effect: I'm not going to do it all for you, but all you need is two more half circles and you've got a shape based logo, which should scale beautifully to any size. So that's 6 circles, two ...


10

The development version of Inkscape (upcoming 0.91 release) has a global anti-aliasing toggle in the Document Properties window, which should also work for export. Look for "Development Versions" on the download page: http://www.inkscape.org/en/download/


9

e100's advice is spot on. A vector application such as Illustrator is the best tool for logo design, whether you start on paper and scan it in, or work directly within the program. This isn't the whole story, however. Scalability doesn't just involve vectors; the detail in a logo must also be adjusted for the size of the finished artwork. Just as with ...


9

The answer is to create your logo artwork as vector rather than raster graphics. You can then use this artwork directly for print work, or export raster artwork at the size you need for web graphics. While Photoshop has some vector support, if you have Creative Suite, Illustrator is the tool for the job. If you don't, then Inkscape (which is free) is worth ...


8

In inkscape, you count on sort of Potrace(an excelent tracer, free) embedded there. Just go to top Path menu, vectorize. I've played quite with its settings, and while you won't get total control you can reduce it to quite an accurate result and few nodes. But you need to play a lot with the settings till you find the right ones for you. It worked for me for ...


8

Because some things almost cannot be vectorised. So, in the world of sound almost the same question can be asked: "Why we are still using wave files when MIDI has so many advantages". Yes, MIDI files can be stretched or transposed in any ratio, and file size is hundreds of times smaller. And also, they can be exported in any quality using different samples. ...


7

One simple solution is to export to PDF, and then use Ghostcript on the resulting PDF. Using a strawberry image from Openclipart and the command gs -dSAFER -dBATCH -dNOPAUSE -sDEVICE=png16m \ -r72 -dGraphicsAlphaBits=1 \ -sOutputFile=image.png image.pdf I get the following result. If your image also includes text, you’ll need to add ...


7

Photographs and pixel-based art can have a real-world fidelity that vector artwork can not easily achieve. In real life, things are not really mathematically precise and clean. One can get greater photo-realism per file-size bit with pixels than with a vector shape. That's not to say you can't achieve near photo-realism with vectors - rather that you'll ...


5

In addition to Adobe Illustrator which is clearly the gold-standard of commercial vector graphics tools, you should give some consideration to Inkscape. Inkscape is a vector drawing tool that would be an excellent chose for building scalable logo art. Inkscape is also free and runs on lots of platforms including both Windows and Mac. The key attribute of ...


5

If you go to the Accessibility control panel, you can enable a zoom mode that blows up whatever is being displayed. Using this, you can detect subpixel antialiasing because it shows up as color fringes when magnified. I tried this out and found that, yes, the Retina MacBook Pro does still use sub-pixel antialiasing (when LCD font smoothing is on). Somewhat ...


5

A Retina display is a screen with a high pixel density. Apple's marketing material defines it like so: The pixel density is so high, your eyes can’t discern individual pixels. But at a technical level, the Retina displays on the iPhone, iPod, iPad and MacBook Pro are exactly double the pixel density of the non-Retina models. This is because scaling to ...


5

The most straightforward way is to open the file in Illustrator, copy, then paste into a Photoshop document. Choose "Shape Layer" in the dialog. Less directly, you could place the file as a Smart Object (or use File > Open as Smart Object), double-click the thumbnail in the Layers Panel to open in Illustrator, then copy and paste. If you don't ...


5

Tracing In case we can not easily recreate the original in a vector oriented application we may also trace the bitmap to a vector graphic. Below example was done with Inkscape where I imported the bitmap to trace it with 2 color steps: This will not preserve the exact circular geometry of the source (note the slightly wavy shapes above), as tracing was ...


4

No, they are not vector. They are raster and remain raster. However, upon output, the raster effects are generated to match the resolution of the output device in conjunction with the Document Raster Effects Settings as well as any scaling which may take place upon output. Make certain the Document Raster Effects Setting (in the Effects menu) is set ...


4

I have not launched Illustrator in a while, but there's one general solution: copy your shape shrink/expand it make a flow transition of shape and color between first and second shapes color first shape fully opaque white and second fully transparent white tweak intermediate shapes count and/or colors there's your inner/outer glow :)


4

Unless I'm mistaken, all raster elements should be listed in the Links panel: You can show this enabling it in the Window menu


4

You can't, at least practically speaking. An image only has so many pixels. To enlarge the photo, you either need to make the individual pixels bigger (it will be noticeably pixelated) or you need to make up extra pixels in between (it will typically be noticeably blurry). For slight enlarging, the latter is usually acceptable--especially with some careful ...


4

It's the .png format that is the problem. .png is a raster format that will not upsize very well, just like any raster format. You need to save it in a vector format, such as: .ai - You'll most likely want to save everything to this format for your own safe keeping because it retains all editability unlike other formats. You would then save the same file ...


4

The reason it's possible is because it doesn't have to be super great quality. Look at this question the print DPI can be much lower on a billboard than your typical print because the viewing distance is so much father away. For instance a 3000x3000px image at 75dpi turns out to be a 40x40in (102x102cm) image. If we switch the dpi to 10, the image becomes ...


3

The image is the standard "information icon" from Windows XP designed by The Iconfactory (iirc). The "i" is Georgia Bold, probably with 110% width and most likely tweaked on a per-pixel basis.


3

Never rely on any print provider to do anything other than spit out your file as it currently exists. I would never trust that something will be output in a specific manner to ensure it is as I expect. If you have to provide instructions or notes on how to output, then it's a recipe for error. If you place a 25ppi image in Indesign it never gets "upsampled" ...


3

Import the Illustrator file into Photoshop as a Smart Object File > Open As Smart Object.\ Use Image > Resize with "Resample" turned on to change the width to 100cm. Be prepared to wait a long time, depending on your RAM and scratch disk (operation may fail if your system isn't up to it). Image > Mode > Greyscale Image > Mode > Bitmap Save ...


3

Illustrator has a feature called live trace. It sounds like it would be perfect for your case. Place the source image. With the source image selected: Object > Live Trace > Make. OR Object > Live Trace > Tracing Options. Set tracing options, and then click Trace. You can then convert the tracing to paths.


3

There's not really a problem including raster images provided you know the final output. Raster images, inside a vector app or not, always have the same limitations in terms of scaling. Placing a raster image into a vector app does not make it resolution independent. With that in mind, it's really your call. If you need infinite scalability, then you ...


3

As @horatio pointed, it's pretty normal loosing the details while zooming on a fixed size image. Assuming that the final destination of your image is a web page, when you perform a zoom operation the browser scales the raster images, usually by interpolation. If you are interested to a web page that can be zoomed, you can use directly SVG as image format ...


3

Your best approach for filesize, image quality, and flexibility will probably be a SVG with an embedded image (or two). If you size and position everything (text, image, vector graphical elements) with the SVG and then put an appropriate "viewBox" parameter on it, the SVG format will handle scaling down the images to size. If you are able to successfully ...


2

At this order of resolution (meant as in ppi) one can drop subpixel rendering altogether without making much of a difference (difference will be almost unnoticable if at all visible). I think even hinting could be dropped and almost no harm will be done. So much pixels on an inch of length implies rather “printwise” mindset instead of traditional ...


2

are they all in one document? if so, you could create multiple artboards and place each object in it's own artboard. then do file / export, choose format:png and check the box for "use artboards". this will export each artboard to it's own png file. or you can try exporting layers directly using this script (I have not tested it).



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