Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

25

You can do a lot of things with vector graphics, eventually however the vector graphics need to be rendered to pixels, rasters etc. This rendering process gets slower the more data you have. In fact 3D graphics is also a vector graphic data. 3d renders show the limitations of your rendering speed as many renders to print size take hours to do. Image 1: 3D ...


18

Vector graphics are graphics in which the image is represented in a mathematical fashion. What this allows one to do is to zoom in an image to infinite precision. They are ideal for situations in which an image might be used at various resolutions and dimensions. Raster graphics are of a fixed dimension, somewhat like a grid pattern with specified values at ...


15

While vector images have many advantages, they also have shortcomings. Vector data is, in general, better suited for items which have hard edges. Vector graphics do not excel at creating soft edges areas or shapes which blend into other soft-edged shapes. Yes, you can use raster effects in many graphics applications to blur or "undefine" the edges of ...


11

The development version of Inkscape (upcoming 0.91 release) has a global anti-aliasing toggle in the Document Properties window, which should also work for export. Look for "Development Versions" on the download page: http://www.inkscape.org/en/download/


10

The best icon libraries I've seen use an hybrid approach: For most sizes you have a vector graphic that is rendered for whatever resolution you want For the really tiny version (16x16px) you make a separate hand tuned bitmap that often isn't even the same image. Vector graphics is especially useful because today you have systems that can natively render ...


10

I'd say there's no quick and dirty fix for choppy lines, you just gotta recreate it using vectors. The following took me 3 minutes in Photoshop with Circles and Stroke effect: I'm not going to do it all for you, but all you need is two more half circles and you've got a shape based logo, which should scale beautifully to any size. So that's 6 circles, two ...


9

@Pearsonartphoto already puts it nicely. In an effort to find the shortest possible definition that is still correct: Vector graphics are a collection of geometrical elements (primitives like circles, squares, triangles... as well as polygons and curves) that you can enlarge to any size. Raster (Pixel) graphics is a collection of coloured dots. You can't ...


9

e100's advice is spot on. A vector application such as Illustrator is the best tool for logo design, whether you start on paper and scan it in, or work directly within the program. This isn't the whole story, however. Scalability doesn't just involve vectors; the detail in a logo must also be adjusted for the size of the finished artwork. Just as with ...


9

The answer is to create your logo artwork as vector rather than raster graphics. You can then use this artwork directly for print work, or export raster artwork at the size you need for web graphics. While Photoshop has some vector support, if you have Creative Suite, Illustrator is the tool for the job. If you don't, then Inkscape (which is free) is worth ...


8

In inkscape, you count on sort of Potrace(an excelent tracer, free) embedded there. Just go to top Path menu, vectorize. I've played quite with its settings, and while you won't get total control you can reduce it to quite an accurate result and few nodes. But you need to play a lot with the settings till you find the right ones for you. It worked for me for ...


8

Because some things almost cannot be vectorised. So, in the world of sound almost the same question can be asked: "Why we are still using wave files when MIDI has so many advantages". Yes, MIDI files can be stretched or transposed in any ratio, and file size is hundreds of times smaller. And also, they can be exported in any quality using different samples. ...


7

(that's Illustrator on the left, Photoshop on the right) Raster images are just grids of pixels, like what comes out of a digital camera or a scanner. The file doesn't know what those pixels mean. Web images and digital paintings are most often raster. Adobe Photoshop, GIMP, Krita, Corel Photopaint and Pixelmator are primarily raster (some have a few ...


7

One simple solution is to export to PDF, and then use Ghostcript on the resulting PDF. Using a strawberry image from Openclipart and the command gs -dSAFER -dBATCH -dNOPAUSE -sDEVICE=png16m \ -r72 -dGraphicsAlphaBits=1 \ -sOutputFile=image.png image.pdf I get the following result. If your image also includes text, you’ll need to add ...


7

Photographs and pixel-based art can have a real-world fidelity that vector artwork can not easily achieve. In real life, things are not really mathematically precise and clean. One can get greater photo-realism per file-size bit with pixels than with a vector shape. That's not to say you can't achieve near photo-realism with vectors - rather that you'll ...


6

The most straightforward way is to open the file in Illustrator, copy, then paste into a Photoshop document. Choose "Shape Layer" in the dialog. Less directly, you could place the file as a Smart Object (or use File > Open as Smart Object), double-click the thumbnail in the Layers Panel to open in Illustrator, then copy and paste. If you don't ...


6

If you go to the Accessibility control panel, you can enable a zoom mode that blows up whatever is being displayed. Using this, you can detect subpixel antialiasing because it shows up as color fringes when magnified. I tried this out and found that, yes, the Retina MacBook Pro does still use sub-pixel antialiasing (when LCD font smoothing is on). Somewhat ...


5

In addition to Adobe Illustrator which is clearly the gold-standard of commercial vector graphics tools, you should give some consideration to Inkscape. Inkscape is a vector drawing tool that would be an excellent chose for building scalable logo art. Inkscape is also free and runs on lots of platforms including both Windows and Mac. The key attribute of ...


5

A Retina display is a screen with a high pixel density. Apple's marketing material defines it like so: The pixel density is so high, your eyes can’t discern individual pixels. But at a technical level, the Retina displays on the iPhone, iPod, iPad and MacBook Pro are exactly double the pixel density of the non-Retina models. This is because scaling to ...


5

Tracing In case we can not easily recreate the original in a vector oriented application we may also trace the bitmap to a vector graphic. Below example was done with Inkscape where I imported the bitmap to trace it with 2 color steps: This will not preserve the exact circular geometry of the source (note the slightly wavy shapes above), as tracing was ...


4

No, they are not vector. They are raster and remain raster. However, upon output, the raster effects are generated to match the resolution of the output device in conjunction with the Document Raster Effects Settings as well as any scaling which may take place upon output. Make certain the Document Raster Effects Setting (in the Effects menu) is set ...


4

I have not launched Illustrator in a while, but there's one general solution: copy your shape shrink/expand it make a flow transition of shape and color between first and second shapes color first shape fully opaque white and second fully transparent white tweak intermediate shapes count and/or colors there's your inner/outer glow :)


4

NOTES: Inkscape would be an example of a Vector Graphics editor, while GIMP/Photoshop/Paint.NET/etc are suited to editing raster images. Ever notice that as you zoom into an image, the quality gets lower? That's a raster image. A raster image is like the one your digital camera takes. They are usually in the formats JPG (lossy), GIF (lossless), PNG (my ...


4

Personally I would go vector. You can scale endlessly and resize to whatever dimensions you may need. In the past maybe bitmap would have been better because for quality icons you would want pixel perfect icons but now with Illustrators 'align to pixel grid' it makes it easier to get pixel perfect. Illustrator also saves you time because you can make the ...


4

Unless I'm mistaken, all raster elements should be listed in the Links panel: You can show this enabling it in the Window menu


4

You can't, at least practically speaking. An image only has so many pixels. To enlarge the photo, you either need to make the individual pixels bigger (it will be noticeably pixelated) or you need to make up extra pixels in between (it will typically be noticeably blurry). For slight enlarging, the latter is usually acceptable--especially with some careful ...


4

It's the .png format that is the problem. .png is a raster format that will not upsize very well, just like any raster format. You need to save it in a vector format, such as: .ai - You'll most likely want to save everything to this format for your own safe keeping because it retains all editability unlike other formats. You would then save the same file ...


4

The reason it's possible is because it doesn't have to be super great quality. Look at this question the print DPI can be much lower on a billboard than your typical print because the viewing distance is so much father away. For instance a 3000x3000px image at 75dpi turns out to be a 40x40in (102x102cm) image. If we switch the dpi to 10, the image becomes ...


4

Without knowing what kind of image you are rasterising, this is kind of a shot in the dark. Yet, here goes: Rasterisation does exactly what the name suggests: making an image into a raster image, also known as a pixel image or bitmap. Rasterisation is usually done to vector graphics or images that have vector components. Vector components can be things like ...


4

Yes, it can. Embed the original image once and for each other instance of that image use a clone (Edit → Clone → Create Clone) and not a duplicate of the original image.


3

Never rely on any print provider to do anything other than spit out your file as it currently exists. I would never trust that something will be output in a specific manner to ensure it is as I expect. If you have to provide instructions or notes on how to output, then it's a recipe for error. If you place a 25ppi image in Indesign it never gets "upsampled" ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible