Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

28

Just think of pixel like Atom, Atom is a smallest particle of matter. Where as Pixel is a smallest particle of Digital Image. Atom has Neutron, Proton & Electron where as Pixel has Red, Green & Blue values :) Number of pixels per Inches or CM etc... is called the Resolution Higher Resolution means More pixels per unit of length like. If you are ...


15

The answer applies both to vector and to rasterized icons. If quality matters, you can't. Large icons contain more details. Those details, which are nice on a 128×128 icon, would be disturbing on a 32×32 icon; instead of helping visually identify the icon, they will do the opposite. For example, a large icon of a keyboard may contain every key of the ...


10

If a client of mine asked for a 1920x1080px image, the first thing I need to know the intended use. Is it for the web, print, or both? In the print world, a pixel (or picture element - [pict-el]) has no meaning or definition. Pixels can not be measured in any way. They have no predefined size or unit in order to calculate their size. Therefore are not a ...


9

If you need to scale images up at the ratio you're describing, it's practically necessary to work with vector images rather than raster images. The main difference is that raster images are made up of pixels, discrete dots of a fixed size, whereas vector images are described by geometric paths. The essential point is that vector images can be scaled up ...


7

I would contact the printer and ask them what size they would like the files delivered. A file that size still can result in issues if you are trying to deliver it at a 1:1 scale. I would ask the printer on their desired scale and at the rip to the digital printer they will modify it to a 1:1. Another thing to be aware of, you could run into computer ...


6

There is more information that is required before you question can be answered accurately. However, you may not fully understand the difference between the Type objects that Illustrator creates. Depending on how you use the Type tool, 3 different basic type objects will be created: Type in an Area This is the type "in frames" that Alan refers to. It can ...


6

Assuming you're scaling up by integer multiples, as per your example, this is easy enough. In the Photoshop resize dialog, just choose Resample image: Nearest Neighbor.


6

Select the Artboard Tool on the Tool bar. You can then click an artboard and change it's size with the options in the Control bar across the top of the screen. Another method is to highlight the artboard in the Artboard Panel (Window > Artboards) and choose Artboard Options from the Panel menu.


6

Simply enter the number of pixels in the measurement fields, with the Artboard Tool selected... You can insert any number and any measurement system and Illustrator will honor it. 1000px, 1000pt, 1000p0, 100", 1000cm, 1000mm, etc. You can also do the same thing in the new document window... enter whatever value you want... You can also simply draw a ...


5

If you don't want your screen shot to be blurry, open the screen shot in PhotoShop, then go to image size, increase the size x2 in each dimension, and then choose 'nearest neighbor' as the interpolation option. The end result will be an image 4 times larger but the pixels will remain aliased and you won't get the blurring.


5

To a degree..... With the exception of Live Type, Photoshop creates vector containers with raster fills. What this means is the edges of shape layers will remain crisp and clear when resized because the shape/vector layer edge is saved as a vector and it is recalculated when resized. However, what is inside the shape layer is not vector. For example, if ...


5

There's a script for that. (this is probably the script Joonas' comment alludes to - works just fine in CS6). (to then fit the art board after fitting the text box, use the art board tool and click on the text box) Courtesy of Kelso Cartography who have loads of great scripts (their scripts to switch point and area text are also highly recommended), you ...


5

Sticking to simple, pre-generated textures, you'll either have to allow some stretching, or allow some slightly awkward overlaps. I believe both ways will need some custom code though. Using stretching: Place corner caps, round the number of bubble tiles needed to fit in between up or down, and stretch (or shrink) that span to make up the difference: ...


5

You really don't need any scripting for this. Select text object with Selection Tool Add new fill via Appearance Panel Move new fill below characters Highlight new fill and choose Effect > Convert to Shape > Rectangle Enter relative amount of points/pixels/inches etc. you want the rectangle to be offset from the text click OK drag the text object to ...


5

There is a computer science paper (really, fun memo) titled, "A pixel is not a little square" by Alvoy Ray Smith. A pixel is a point sample. It exists only at a point. For a color picture, a pixel might actually contain three samples, one for each primary color contributing to the picture at the sampling point. We can still think of this as a point ...


5

First and foremost, contact your printer. In my experience, lots of printers of large materials allow you to deliver a pdf in, say 1:10 or a similar scale, with some requirements to the dpi quality of your pdf. Second, I'd advise you to design regardless of size in Illustrator, and then place, process and distill everything to a printable pdf in InDesign.


4

320 / 541 = .591 (that is, 320 pixels is 59.1% of 541 pixels) 600 * .591 = 354.6 (so 354.6 is 59.1% of 600) rounded up to 355 pixels There's your width; do the same calculations for the height. //edit for height: 240 / 341 = .704 449 * .704 = 316.1 round down to 316px


4

As Horatio says, if it looks good, it's probably fine. There are two schools of thought on upsampling: One says, "Never, ever upsample"; the other says, "Hey, what the heck, upsampling rocks." In almost all cases I side with the former. Upsampling adds nothing but "best guesses" to the image. It specifically doesn't add any image information (I don't care ...


4

I'm betting that the photo of the girl is killing your size right now. To test that, remove her frame and replace it with one of the other frames of your animation. I'll bet the size drops quite a bit. Animated GIFs are best kept small by keeping their color pallets limited, and avoiding continuous tone graphics (photos, gradients, opacity shifts, etc.). ...


4

Obviously, It wasn't a bug, It's an option in the transform panel called Align to Pixel Grid. Sorry Illustrator!


4

800 pixels by 800 pixels and need to convert them in Photoshop to 72 ppi for web use (at the same size: 800px by 800px). There's no conversion to do. If they're 800 pixels by 800 pixels, that's it, they're the size you need. However, 300ppi at 800px by 800px is like a 2.3" by 2.3" picture, so are you sure the files are currently at 800pixels by ...


4

There's a script for that by the awesome John Wundes (no affiliation). It's called Set ALL the things, explained here, and lets you set width and height for selected objects. It can set a whole bunch of other values for selected items, too, if you know the names for them (or, if you look up their names in the Illustrator Scripting Guide or in that ...


4

In my testing here..... live Rounded rectangles do not scale their rounding at all. If you set the rounding to 10px, it stays at 10px no matter how you scale the shape. That's your issue. You've got a rounded rectangle there to meet the ellipses and the corner rounding doesn't scale at the same rate as the ellipses. You could adjust the rectangle rounding ...


4

Illustrator doesn't (as of 5.1) have a handy "fit frame to content" feature like InDesign. Just select the text frame and drag the handles inward until the frame is snug to the text.


4

Converting to a smart object won't change the quality when the image is reduced, it will only allow you to resize the image afterwards back to normal without loss of quality. Convert to smart object anyway, as it's good practice. Go to Settings -> General Change 'Image Interpolation' to 'Bicubic sharper' see if that helps maintain some detail.


4

Essentially, you have to draw or re-draw your small icon. Ideally you work from a vector based version that you scale down and then tweak the details on pixel-level, but scaling down a rastered version will work, too. Your scaling results will be better, if you scale exactly 50%, 25%, 12.5%, etc, because photoshop has to blur less between pixels. ...


4

The term "pixel" is short for "picture element". An image has consists of pixels, which are just colored dots in a rectangle, with no size. To show the image, we use a screen that can show colored dots, and need to decide which dots we want to show where. Looking at the details, the image consists of separate dots, each with a separate color. Like when ...


4

One more confusion to complete the discussion: In website design and layout, one "CSS pixel" is always equal to 1/96th of a "CSS inch", regardless of screen resolution. This was done because so many early websites used pixel-based measurements for layout assumed a standard screen resolution. In order that the actual size of text and other content ...


4

No. When you resize multiple objects it's always a transformation. There is no way to keep area text from transforming as well. You simply can't do what you want. In fact.... Adobe even broke this very thing in InDesign. What you want used to work in InDesign CS4, but Adobe broke it starting with InDesign CS5... and they don't appear to care that it's ...


3

Uncheck "Align to Pixel Grid" on the Transform Panel.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible