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There is a computer science paper (really, fun memo) titled, "A pixel is not a little square" by Alvoy Ray Smith. http://www.cs.princeton.edu/courses/archive/spring06/cos426/papers/smith95b.pdf


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PSD Tuts has a video that explains the relationship between pixels here Pixels


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One more confusion to complete the discussion: In website design and layout, one "CSS pixel" is always equal to 1/96th of a "CSS inch", regardless of screen resolution. This was done because so many early websites used pixel-based measurements for layout assumed a standard screen resolution. In order that the actual size of text and other content ...


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The term "pixel" is short for "picture element". An image has consists of pixels, which are just colored dots in a rectangle, with no size. To show the image, we use a screen that can show colored dots, and need to decide which dots we want to show where. Looking at the details, the image consists of separate dots, each with a separate color. Like when ...


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If a client of mine asked for a 1920x1080px image, the first thing I need to know the intended use. Is it for the web, print, or both? In the print world, a pixel (or picture element - [pict-el]) has no meaning or definition. Pixels can not be measured in any way. They have no predefined size or unit in order to calculate their size. Therefore are not a ...


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A pixel has no correlation to real world measurements. As such, there is no way to convert inches to pixels in any consistent way. It's all arbitrary and dependent on what you're doing to do with the image int he end. What is a pixel in the context of a digital image? It's the smallest unique element within the image. It will have a color assigned to it. ...


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Inches are physical dimensions while pixels are screen dimensions. At the same resolution, a pixel is physically bigger on a larger screen, as the density or PPI (pixels per inch) is controlled by the screens physical size vs resolution. So when converting pixels to inches, it all comes down to what you want your pixels per inch (PPI) to be. If you want ...


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Just think of pixel like Atom, Atom is a smallest particle of matter. Where as Pixel is a smallest particle of Digital Image. Atom has Neutron, Proton & Electron where as Pixel has Red, Green & Blue values :) Number of pixels per Inches or CM etc... is called the Resolution Higher Resolution means More pixels per unit of length like. If you are ...


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When you increase the size of an image (whether in Photoshop or any other program), the program has to add pixels. Since the information about what exactly what color those pixels should be doesn't exist in the original image, the program has to guess what it should add. There are different ways to make those guesses, but they are always nothing more than a ...


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Unfortunately, no. thats a 500% increase in size. if its a completely geometric image with sharp edges, under Image Size you can select "Preserve Hard Edges" under Resampling. But any antialiasing and it will have pixel degradation.


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I assume that you tried the standard method already, with the best settings, and you are saying that result is missing "quality". Depending on what you call quality, maybe the original image just does not have enough quality for an image in the larger size? It could help if you add example images to explain the problem.


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Since this is a CV, I suspect you're doing it in Word, which doesn't handle resizing of pngs very well. (I'm being overly benign saying it that way. Word's sadistic treatment of innocent raster images is worthy of a trial at The Hague.) The open source clones aren't better. Follow DA01's advice and skip the icons, or find some EPS versions (or, better yet, ...


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You don't mention the software being used. When you are working in Photoshop, you are working with pixels only (aka dots). When you export to PDF, you are creating a document which is going to be printed with a presumed fixed real-world dimension (such as 8.5 x 11 inches). This is where the number of available dots comes into play, because the quality is ...


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In comment 34 of this post: http://photographylife.com/how-to-delete-exif-data a reply (comment 38) mentions that this is a bad method due to re-compression issues - It will remove it, but it's not the best way to remove it. The article itself mentions how to do it without re-compressing the image in Lightroom/Photoshop.



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