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There are some resizing programs that have diferent algorithms than the tipical bicubic. The main diference is that this kind of programs try to preserve the sharp edges between colours (the bicubic aproach is to soften the borders) so, in this case becouse the type of gaphic could work. They don't perform miracles, but can help you to enlarge the image ...


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If you want to use it for a web-page or a ruff sketch it is ok, if you want to print it you should not use it. Well, you can, but it would only be "good" at a certain width (1 to 3 cm i guess). I would suggest NOT to redraw it in Illustrator as you always ALTER it, which is never a good idea. In such cases you have to contact your client(?) to get a ...


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From what you've stated, you're a little stuck for choices. As it's impossible to add pixel quality, improving the quality is tricky. Personally, in your situation I would print the logo as best as possible, then photography it as best as possible. Some photoshop editing, better quality. If you have a good printer and good camera, you should be good to go.


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uhmm, if you are using PS: press ctrl-t hold shift re-shape for perfect resize


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Probably the imgur resizing algorithm includes a sharpen function. Try aplying some sharpening yourself. Menu > Filter > Sharpen There are several filters you can use, so try them with the default options and see if they work for you, but you can try with "Smart Sharpen" Here are some video tutorials from the adobe help center to understand a little mor ...


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It's simple. When you export the file, you define the resolution to screen (72 ppi): Menu > File > Export > choose the format you want > Resolution: screen (72 ppi)


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Try this: Edit->Preferences->General->Snap Vector Tools and Transforms to Pixel Grid


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The best solution I have found for this is to use the old Bilinear sampling method when I need to resize and avoid the 1 pixel semi-transparent border. You can find it under Image > Image Size > Resample: (select Bilinear). It doesn't resample quite as nicely as the Bicubic method, but I find it's good enough and it does solve the problem.


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If you would like to export at a given resolution, instead of exporting as PNG, choose File > Save for Web. On the right side you will be given the option to specify your PNG file dimensions in pixels, allowing you to export below 72ppi without changing your Illustrator canvas/image size.


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As far as I know, there is no option to magnify the filter. But there is a workaround, albeit an imperfect one: Make a shape you want to fill with the Note Paper filter. Make another one, the same color that your original shape, and convert it to Smart Object (this will help edit the filter's settings later if you're not satisfied with them). Apply the ...


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Another solution: Group your objects: Enable "Snap to bounding box corners" and "Snap bounding box corners": Draw a rectangle, any size: Resize the rectangle: Final result:


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Group your objects. Copy (Ctrl+C) Draw some rectangle (its position and size do not matter). Select your rectangle. Edit → paste size → paste size. Open the alignment tab and set relative to to first selected. Select your group and then your rectangle. Use centre on vertical axis and centre on horizontal axis from the alignment tab.


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I have to print a 20cm x 20cm image at 150dpi but the one I took with my camera is 10x10 at 300 dpi It's math. The above two images are exactly the same in terms of image data: 20 x 150 = 10 X 300 The only time they'd differ is when printing from software that looks at the DPI meta data. If the software obeys the DPI setting, it will then do some math ...


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It is much easier if you change you thinking pattern as follows: Instead of thinking in terms of physical units and DPI. Think about total pixels. After all for the digital images that all that counts. All DPI stuff just gets people perennially confused. It does not matter until you plan to print, a digital image is dimensionless. When you start to prepare ...


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DPI, or more accurately PPI (pixels per inch) is just information how to scale pixels to a physical length measure, ie. PPI = number of horizontal pixels / physical width of the end result (or vertical pixels per height of the image, respectively). Hence, if you increase the size of your image and reduce the amount of PPI with the same ratio at the same ...


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There is no way to resize the image without losing a lot of quality in the image. You can: Try creating the logo in photoshop. Trace with the pen tool. Then follow this tutorial to get a chrome effect. http://photoshopcafe.com/tutorials/chrome/chrome.htm or search for other tutorials. The other way is to up-scale the image you have but probably won't give ...



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