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41

I like the accepted answer, it has good advice, but I thought I'd expand on it a bit. For wall sized graphics and large banners (e.g 3m x 5m), what is an acceptable PPI/DPI for print. Here's definitions, so we know what we're talking about. DPI = Dots per inch = units used to measure the resolution of a printer LPI = Lines per inch = The offset ...


41

PPI (Pixels Per Inch) settings are not used in web images. Images on the web, retina displays or otherwise, are displayed by their pixel dimensions (width and height) not any PPI/DPI setting. In fact, many web images such as png, gif, jpg may not even store a ppi setting in their internal data and rely on width and height settings. A 100 pixel x 100 pixel ...


27

In general you should use vector graphics in the artwork wherever practical, and deliver final artwork to the printer in PDF or other vector format. Your finished print will then be limited only by the output resolution of the print device. This is particularly important with text and line art — visible rasterization in the finished print will be very ...


16

I'm not sure this question is on-topic, but it's the first question on the site, so here we go: What you're looking for are layer based slices. Select the layers you want to export, go to Layer > New Layer Based Slice(s) Go to File > Save for Web & Devices... When saving, choose "All User Slices" If you have overlapping layers, which you will have ...


15

I've always thought DPI was somewhat of a misnomer... It really only applies if you are printing an image, otherwise, well, pixels are pixels. For an image on a site, well, it really doesn't matter, just get as many as possible, to fit the required size. Printers vary somewhat, but around 300 DPI is usually a good rule of thumb for anything around the size ...


15

The only definitive answer to this question is: Ask your vendor. Every vendor, every printer, every t-shirt maker, etc will have their own particular preferences as to how they want to receive files and how they want them set up. Discussing this with your vendor before you begin is crucial to ensure that the process goes smoothly. The general rules of ...


13

A pixel (the word was originally coined, iirc, by IBM and derives from "picture element") is the smallest indivisible unit of information in a digital image. Pixels may be displayed, or they may be printed, but you can't divide pixels into smaller pieces to get more information. How many channels and bits per channel make up one pixel is the measure of how ...


13

Grande format resolutions, as various folks have pointed out, depend on viewing distance. Several answers refer to line screens, but technology has moved on. Very few, if any, grande format jobs are printed that way, and in any case, none of the answers indicated how to translate from PPI (dots) resolution in Photoshop to LPI (lines of dots at different ...


11

320 x 480 is a very common resolution for mobile phones. Here is a big list of a lot of phones and their resolutions. Maybe it'll help give you an idea of what's out there. For desktops Full Screen: 800 x 600 1024 x 768 1280 x 960 1280 x 1024 1600 x 1200 Widescreen: 1280 x 720 1280 x 800 1440 x 900 1680 x 1050 1920 x 1080 1920 x 1200 1024 x 768, ...


9

Preview is simply a terrible PDF viewer. It has many rendering issues with PDFs. Preview is designed by Apple to view PDFs for average home end-users. It is not designed to be a professional PDF viewer. Apple simply appears to not be concerned with many rendering issues in Preview where PDFs are concerned. What you are describing I'd actually call one of ...


8

File→Script→Export Layers to Files... Make sure the Trim Layers check box is checked before exporting. This will save a 200x200 layer with a 1000x1000 composition as a 200x200 PNG file.


8

One thing you can do is: Hide everything you don't want to see (option click the "eye" icon of your chosen layer) Select all Copy merged Create a new file (it'll automatically be the size of your clipboard, which should have resized to the size of actual pixels in your selection) Paste and save as a PNG Repeat! There are scripts for this if ...


8

In general, enlarge the image using Bicubic interpolation (sometimes, depending on the image, "Bicubic Smoother" works better, but usually straight Bicubic is more satisfactory), then either use Smart Sharpen to bring back the edge contrast, or copy the layer, set the blend mode of the copy to Overlay, and run Filter > Other > High Pass. Sometimes you ...


8

For our printing partners, we almost exclusively submit PDFs for printing. Unfortunately, PDFs have dimension limits. It was around 5 meters (I Googled, it's 200 inches). So we scale down. We usually do it for those hoarding artworks -- hoardings are "panels" that you use to board up when you're constructing a new store inside a mall (or any building ...


7

Should my images be saved at a specific PPI? No. iOS ignores PPI (pixels per inch) stored inside images. However, the pixel dimensions of your images do matter, so make sure you get those right. It’s also important to ensure your 2× images are exactly double the dimensions of your 1× images and that elements within the image are in the same ...


7

I recently read jrista's marvellous q&a from photo.stackexchange. While the question is titled "How do I generate high quality prints with an ink jet printer?" it covers DPI & PPI relationship to quite an extent and has real-world print examples. Current Q&A contents: Summary Detailed Explanation Empirical Studies: Does PPI really matter? ...


7

If you'll be going to a digital print shop to make the posters (which would be usual for a small run for a local event), you'll be fine at 150 ppi, and for a background image you probably wouldn't be in trouble at 100 ppi, particularly since it likely won't contain a lot of high-frequency detail that would conflict with your text. An 11x17 poster is mostly ...


7

The DPI of the image itself is not really that important. What is important is how big you will print the image and what kind of press/printer will be used to print it. This is why: DPI, dimensions and pixels The dimensions of an image can be specified in 2 different ways. Indicate DPI and dimensions in inches (or cm) Indicate dimensions in pixels (or ...


6

How close are you going to view the 4' canvas? Is reducing the dpi really going to adversely affect printing on a coarse material like cotton or silk. Thats coarse relative to smooth glossy photo prints, for example. See this recent question: What DPI should a large format artwork for print be done at?


6

iPhone4 retina displays are 960x640 with 326 dpi (ppi). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Retina_display#Display


6

The type of the display is not actually important. Any decent OS has options to set the screen resolution and/or font, icon and other GUI elements sizes. Here is simple example: It has been taken on my netbook with OpenSuse and 1024x600 display, far away from "retina display". I simply set the default UI font to DejaVu Sans 24 and switched on all "anti ...


6

You are talking about microprinting. The whole idea of that, is that you cannot reproduce it by using printers or printing presses. It is engraving that are designed to trip up professional counterfeiters. So, no, I can´t see how on earth it would be possible to pull off. (of course, if you have unlimited resources and good connections in shady parts of town ...


6

If you're using a set amount of pixels, let's say 500 x 500, it won't matter whether you're using 300 ppi or 72 ppi because the amount pixels in the image would still be 500. If you wan't to lower the file size of your image you will either need to scale down the image or save the image in a lower quality format: Or use Save for Web as this can give you ...


5

This is answer is purely from a website standpoint. Media querie, curtesy of CSS3, gives us more control over how a website will look at various resolutions. As you scale down the width of the browser it will swap to the code for that width. Some info on Media Queries - http://www.stuffandnonsense.co.uk/blog/about/hardboiled_css3_media_queries This falls ...


5

In Photoshop, enlarging should not cause pixelation by default. Go into Edit > Preferences > General... and make sure that "Image Interpolation" is set to one of the Bicubic options (there is even one for enlarging it looks like). Also, if using Image > Image Size... to resize a photo, make sure at the bottom the Image Size dialog you have "Resample Image" ...


5

While you can increase text size etc to magnify things before taking a screenshot Another option to try (on MacOSX) is to use the disability features to zoom the screen in before taking a screenshot. I haven't used a mac for over a year but I remember in 10.5 you could zoom in quite a lot and I think it stayed quite clear. I'm sure similar features are ...


4

If you want your photoshop to match the pixels on the Kindle, then your PSD file should be 1024x600 pixels. DPI is a measurement of the pixel density on the device itself and has no real bearing on your PSD file.


4

Roger's right. You WILL NOT be in trouble at 150 ppi for an inkjet-type print process, especially at that size. But let's pretend that you can't change the 300 ppi requirement. The problem you are running into is memory, and it may be an impossible hill to climb without upgrading your hardware, but here are some basic steps that can mitigate the problem: ...


4

As Horatio says, if it looks good, it's probably fine. There are two schools of thought on upsampling: One says, "Never, ever upsample"; the other says, "Hey, what the heck, upsampling rocks." In almost all cases I side with the former. Upsampling adds nothing but "best guesses" to the image. It specifically doesn't add any image information (I don't care ...



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