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1

The problems you see are compression artifacts. If you want to make them less visible apply less JPEG compression on your Image, this in turn will make the banner larger in size. Image 1-2: 2 compressed JPG images, the one on the left has more compression (25) that the one on the right (90). But the less compressed image is more than 4 times larger in ...


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Some thoughts. That is not necesarly a resolution issue, but how thin lines are processed. 1) An aliased image consist in some transition pixels to simulate smoothness If you have a thin line, lets say below of a pixel in size, you get just the aliased part: A gray line. In thin lines this diference is very notorious. One posible solution is making ...


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This is because Retina display requires more pixels, as explained in details in this post: http://www.sitepoint.com/css-techniques-for-retina-displays/ In order to fix that, you can: 1) As PieBie suggested, use the font directly as icon; 2) Use alternative high resolution picture with either media query or JavaScript. You can find example code in the 1st ...


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Totally depends on the aplication you are using for your "final layout". If you are using Indesign, there is the Preflight Window, where iy shows you the ppi of the "Links and Images". (File > Preflight) There are some simmilar inspectors on Corel Draw for example. On a flatened image, like JPG, there is no way of knowing the source images resolution on a ...


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What format? This is important. If you get random JPG/TIFF etc, just check the pixel dimensions and divide by 2x the expected line screen*. If the result is approximately your anticipated desired printed dimensions, you have proper resolution. So if you are printing a magazine at 150lpi on press, the recommended dpi/ppi is going to be 300. A 3000px image ...


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Your screen's resolution (as are most screen resolutions) 72 ppi. If you change the resolution to be higher, it will appear larger on your screen to achieve the same visual "density" if you will. Likewise, when the resolution is lower, it will appear smaller. Allow me a metaphor. Imagine you cover 1 sq. inch with 72 cheerios and you are looking at it ...


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As a general rule, when your working on a screen, forget about physical dimensions and resolution (PPI). All that affects the size you see something on screen is its pixel dimensions. Your screen doesn't know what an inch is, all it knows is pixels. In your examples: 1×1 inch image at 72PPI is 72×72 pixels. 1×1 inch image at 27PPI is 27×27 pixels. Your ...


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The dimensions you mention above are very, very large. Providing they are correct, either of the 300dpi files will print well (though for that matter, a 200cm+ image at 72dpi will print well on most applications). As a general rule, printing a 300dpi image at 100% scale will give you a good result.


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No. None of your specific questions come to play. The number of pixels in a digital display is fixed, so no nothing changes the pixel density of a display. Pixel density has no meaning for the generator of a image the only thing that counts is how many pixels your display has. The physical size and density are beyond your reach, but they also do not affect ...


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...increased DPI... only its effectible print size. Nop. That is PPI. DPI is a printer capability unit. I think the root of the problem is that the dpi is widley known because for a time was an important issue to buy a printer. This unit was adopted as image quality. A scanner was thought as just the input part of the same ecosystem. The people just ...


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Those terms are largely misunderstood for two reasons: Most people do not really understand what units are. Units have been taught to most by memorization, and quite lot of it, without much deep thought put into the subject. Since this kind of learning worked for most purposes for other units then they think it works for this too. From this follows that ...



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