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1

I hate to say this but you should really ask the printer for this; he'll tell you what's the max he can print at. If you speak with their prepress department and the printer operators, they'll really tell you in details what's the best process. Don't waste your time with the sales department, (no offense to salesmen) they usually repeat the same cassette ...


2

The dialog box is very clear: File > Export bitmap In the dialog box choose units: Inches Below will say: width: 600, height: 600 (this is the size in pixels) and little to the right will say 300 ppi. (this is the print resolution) The math behind it is very simple 2 inches, at 300 pixels each inch = 2x300 = 600 px.


2

The one biggest difference really is: When you design in @2x you can export in @1x When you design in @1x you can't export in @2x


2

I do not understand the @2x as a "trend". It sometimes is a requirement on web design. @2x, @3x, @Nx is not a way to design everything, it is a declaration on a css stylesheet to use an image at higher resolution. It is a specific case of high resolution devices. Aka Iphone, Ipad. The resolution is higher than normal. If thoose systems declare the ...


1

It's for Retina displays and higher density devices. And you need to have a higher resolution for these and since it's easier to shrink an image than resize it bigger when the files are created bigger from the start. The files that are rasterized and prepared for Retina are usually ending with the @2x.jpg for example, because the script calling them ...


4

what's the difference between a 360ppi mock vs a 72ppi mock When talking about screen mock-ups, absolutely nothing. The only thing that matters is pixel dimensions. As for your concerns, non of them are really all that much of an issue for a team of designers and developers that understand the process. Very large file sizes Hard drives are ...


0

As Rafael points out, 300dpi is the same as 118dpc (dots per centimeter?) Note that 300dpi is 'standard' for printing photographs. If your Artwork is text or line-art based, however, you want to be printing at much higher resolutions. 600dpi at minimum (if not higher at 1200dpi for high quality printing).


-1

Just to let you know, ppi is used for web, and dpi for print. For exporting the regular values are 72 ppi for normal, 325 ppi if you have retina displays in mind, and 300 ppi for print, some printers can take higher, but normal ones 300 is enough.


3

The unit is 300 ppi. So if you convert it to cm you need to divide 300/2.54=118.11 ppcm. Use 118 ppcm or 300 ppi. But try not to use Photo-IUsethisProgramForAllButIShouldNot-Shop, but a vector based one, like Ilustrator, Corel, Inkscape, Scribus, Indesign, Serif Page Plus.


3

Hum. you need to make things right. That jpg probably won't work. A low resolution does not work becouse depening on the size it can have some pattern, and you do not want that. The barcode needs to be vector. The only alternative is to have a pure monocromatic file. But in my opinion at 600-1200ppi. It is quite easy to have a vector barcode. Download ...


4

First of all, don't print anything in 72 dpi ever, especially on packaging. Even though the barcode might be scannable, you do not want compression artifacts on a package, especially not on a barcode. Thats why I would strongly advise not to use a jpeg for this at all, instead create a vector so that the image is scalable without loss. Secondly, to test ...



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