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Your Smartobject-layer has a litle smartobject-icon at the layer preview. Doubleclick on that. You'll be redirected to the Photoshop Documsnt thats embedded in the Smart Object. Now you see the Smartobject as it gets saved by photoshop, so it should be easy to get the resolution from here.


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Go to Windows > Properties a new toolbar will appear, after that you can select a smart object and it will show you the exact dimension


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It is 800 x 115. A quick Google search told me.


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There are several different and somewhat related issues being presented in this thread. I will address one of them, how to see accurate print size on screen when you use Photoshop. This is not done to assess the print quality but "print presence" or how a print may appear in the selected image size. This is, unfortunately, set incorrectly in Photoshop but ...


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You don't mention what you're using to do your layout. If you have Adobe Acrobat Pro, and in the way you made your graphics, you could selectively lower the resolution of the grayscale or color images only. But for this, your image must be in a real grayscale mode. If you have Adobe Acrobat Pro, open your file with it. Go on the file menu and select "save ...


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As a simple way to visualize resolution, the higher the resolution is, the smaller the pixels will be once printed. That's why you see a different size on your screen depending on the resolution when looking at the image's dimension; if the resolution is 300ppi for example, the pixels will be smaller and more concentrated. If the image is 72ppi, the pixels ...


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t has become commonplace to refer to PPI as DPI, even though PPI refers to input resolution. Industry standard, good quality photographs usually require 300 pixels per inch, at 100% size, when printed onto coated paper stock, using a printing screen of 150 lines per inch (lpi).


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As an addendum to some of these great answers, there should be a distinction made about the term "density." In the ink/offset press world, "density" refers to ink coverage. But in the photography world (it is called PHOTOshop, after all), "density" refers to brightness -- a carry-over from film terminology. So we have three uses of the term "density" that ...


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Other answers have more than adequately explained resolution, so I'll explain density, which has a VERY different meaning in the graphic design world. Ink density is the total area coverage of paper by the printed ink dots, from 0-400% (100% each for CMYK), and this is important because depending on the printing process, only 250-350% is available for use, ...


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Many image formats contain the chosen ppi value as an advice to other applications. For instance, when placing an image in indesign, it will be of the size specified in photoshop. Even if the pixel count is exactly the same, it will be different sizes. Using highres images in indesign is cumbersome with the wrong ppi set. This is an image in PS. As you can ...


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Possibly related: is it mandatory to keep 72 dpi for web design? What if I create in 200dpi? Resolution was the universal term for print production before the web really existed. History dictates it be called resolution. And resolution is the correct term when discussing image quality for print output. Density only refers to on-screen and has no bearing ...


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The PPI doesn't really matter if you use pixels as units; 1000x1000 pixels at 300 or 72ppi will still be 1000x1000 pixels. But when you change the units to inches, then you'll notice one is smaller than the other; there will be be more pixels per inch as the name says. As you mentioned, PPI is more for printing, but it can also now be used as a reference for ...


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I can see 2 things that may be happening to you: 1) If there is an "artificial" resizing on your website while using the mobile version, the image might look blurry. What I mean by artificial is that you're changing the dimensions in the CSS or html. To fix this, you would need to have an image of the exact size you want to use for your mobile and laptop ...


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If you are saving for the web I would suggest using SVG. We do have a few questions that may help you out if you haven't searched the site: Search for small fuzy Results show: Why does it seem Photoshop is the common answer to icon design instead of Illustrator?. As Alan points out it is better to create pixel by pixel so you might get a better result in ...



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