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7

If you're going to get one book on typography, I would grab The Elements of Typographic Style by Robert Bringhurst. It's self–demonstrating and is filled with tons of useful and intriguing examples, as well as an informative, but brief history of type. It's a great introduction that will continue to prove helpful far into the future.


7

Here are the steps you should take at this point: Obtain and read "The Non-Designer's Design and Type Books" by Robin Williams. This is the book I consistently recommend to anyone in your situation and quite often to my own clients to help them get a better grasp on the subject. It's easy to read, very practical, and full of simple-to-grasp visual examples ...


6

Perhaps a slightly oblique answer, but I recommend you buy The Non-Designer's Design and Type Book by Robin Williams. There is no better resource, and you'll find all the answers you need to get you rolling, both for typography and layout. This is especially true for the "instructions on how to use these typefaces" -- that's a book length answer ...


6

I am not going to give you a massive list of resources, but as a basic understanding of graphic elements, I will recommend first: Visual Grammar by Christian Leborg I also think that seasoned designers would do well to dip into this now and then; we often get stuck in our use of elements. It goes right to the base of the nature of visual grammar. Best ...


5

The Form of the Book by Jan Tschichold. He dedicated a tremendous amount of time to researching the minutiae of classical typography. In his very German way, this collection of articles distills all that work down to digestible chunks of info. Judging by Amazon's price, I'm not the only one who loves this book! See if you can find it elsewhere for cheap. I ...


5

The principles for minimal logo design are good illustration skills paired with brand identity. The examples you gave are not logos but merely animal illustrations. It is easy to illustrate something that has a clear message, like "elephant", or "dog". And the clever use of negative space is simply practice. What makes this process so much harder for logos ...


4

I thoroughly recommend this website: http://hellohappy.org/beautiful-web-type/. There aren't so many combinations but they showcase them in such an inspirational way. All the fonts are available free for commercial use from the brilliant Google Font Directory. If you want to try your own combinations out to see what you like (as that's the most important ...


4

This isn't exactly the answer you're looking for, but here are a few thoughts: Hoefler & Frere-Jones are pretty much the cream of the typographic crop. They sent an e-mail awhile back that showed some really great font pairings (with their fonts, of course), but at the top there's a good rule listed: ...all built around H&FJ's Highly Scientific ...


4

This question crops up here from time to time, and no doubt others will link to similar questions. I think, however, that you touch on a very important issue. We have a post here with resources for design beginners. It certainly applies to web as well. Yes, there are rules-of-thumb for web design and web aesthetics. What is tricky with web is that it is ...


4

This is a difficult question to answer. This is an art, not a science, and there are no hard rules. Every rule has a counter-example which is arguably successful. Many successful rule-breaking forays are things which the previous generation would have thrown away rather than submit. Regarding typefaces use, the old rule is that 3 typefaces is one too many, ...


4

The book that changed the way I see typography was Just My Type by Simon Garfield. It's not exactly technical, it's more of a book of stories about fonts, but it's done and narrated beautifully. I would definitely recommend it! Just My Type examines how Helvetica and Comic Sans took over the world. It explains why we are still influenced by type ...


3

Both Adobe and Microsoft have put a lot of resources into CJK font development. The Creative Suites (and InDesign as a standalone product) and Windows 7 ship with several that provide quite a variety of styles among them. In the Adobe Font Store choose "Classification" from the search menu in the right sidebar. You'll find Chinese, Japanese, etc. Fonts.com ...


3

Each figure is drawn independently using whatever method best suits you. Drawing then "manipulating joints" isn't really how it's done unless you are thinking of 3D figures. Final desired output would determine the best software to use. In general, using a vector application to create the figures would allow some editing of the same figure repeatedly. In ...


3

The edit to the question now makes this answer seem a bit "off". The original question was "What is the best book to learn Photoshop?" PeachPit Press' Adobe Photoshop Classroom in a Book is the book written by Adobe. It covers every single feature and tool in Photoshop and is the definitive source for any information regarding how the application works. ...


3

Oh, there are ways. Here are some options in order asc from shitty and easy, to less shitty and hard. Rely entirely on this one article and make sure to always use serif or sans-serif as the final font in your list. Check out the OS font stack for OSX on wikipedia. Google around for type specimens for those fonts, and trust that it looks ok in your usage. ...


3

Whatfontis.com is an alternative to whatthefont.com, but you have the option to just display free fonts. However, when uploading my example, I could not find anything suitable. A manually found alternative, in my opinion, would be Source Sans Pro, Semibold. As the width differs, I tweaked kerning manually:


3

The best way to find fonts right now is to ask people who know. I'm not aware of a service; any font-identification service is typically created to drive sales, so there's not really an incentive to make version that drives you to FOSS typography. So, you're in the right place :) Font identification happens often here, and there are a lot of people who can ...


3

To answer your first question, the type of tool you're looking for is called a prototyping or wireframing tool. Wireframing "primarily allows you to define the information hierarchy of your design, making it easier for you to plan the layout according to how you want your user to process the information"[1], whereas prototyping is creating "a first, typical ...


2

Welcome to GD.SE! Since you are new to Photoshop, you could check these similar questions, I'm sure you'll find lots of useful information in them (they sound rather specific to programmers, or to web, but they actually have resources for all kinds of design): Need directions regarding the learning process I should follow for learning Photoshop Tips and ...


2

"Stop Stealing Sheep" is a typical Type 101 required reading: http://www.amazon.com/Stop-Stealing-Sheep-Works-Edition/dp/0201703394


2

Lots of great suggestions here, I would add Thinking with Type by Ellen Lupton (which also comes with well-documented companion website. It is different from Bringhurst or Tschichold as it contains much more about expression but still contains lots of information about the smaller details in type.


2

Illustrator would be the best for redoing those designs. A great resource is this site: http://vector.tutsplus.com - there's tutorials from beginner to intermediate and also other links. If there's something specific you need to do (like I see there's graphs as well as line drawings) check on the adobe help site as well as seeing if there's any adobe video ...


2

Have you tried fooont.com? It consists entirely of font pairs that are hosted on Google Webfonts. Just download the CSS file and use it instantly on your website. Hope this will help :)


2

For better understanding of fonts you can refer to https://typekit.com/ They have a great collection of fonts to use for web design, and even google fonts have a good collection of free fonts too. Work with fonts, play with fonts. It's the only way to become good at font selection.


2

To be honest, I'm not too big a fan of your secure and easy icons. Particularly the secure one - it made me think that the car is unlikely to get stolen, rather than that my family would be safe in it (which I gather is the point?). I like @Yisela's suggestions... Alternately, if you want a part of a car instead of the entire car, you could do something ...


2

Fast thought and even faster execution. Maybe something like this? Personaly for me only the "car" is correct. Of course it should be a bit faster ;) but I know that it's in progress yet. Thumb means rather OK than easy and the padlock means that something is locked.


2

These are my top must-reads for all new designers: The Elements of Typographic Style How to Be a Graphic Designer without Losing Your Soul I have more, but need the reputation in order to post. — JMS


2

Yes. A good illustrator can achive that in Corel, Illustrator or Photoshop. A very good one. The rest of the mortals need a 3d program with some specific render engines, specificly a raytrace or path trace, one of the so-called phisically based. You can use some excellent free tools. For example http://www.blender.org, Probably the best "all in one" ...


2

Great question by the way. First off we're fortunate to live in an age where a properly built PDF will get you perfect prints (or near perfect) most of the time with most printers. Meaning the tools and processes are getting to a point where the designer typically does not need to worry (much) about the finer details of print production. So that out of the ...


2

I don't agree with Bryan. I have a B. Des and in 4 years of school most of the courses weren't technical but at all. It is hard to come up with a list, I think the best you can do is look at the syllabus of any good design school to know what to read about and in what order. I can recommend a few subjects and an order but in the end the best way to learn ...



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