Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

The title of this question seems to have nothing to do with what you're asking. Do you need to know the trim/bleed sizes? That's something you need to get from your printer. If you're asking what to do, because your client needs this for both web and print use, then yes, you will definitely need two files. Depending on what makes up most of your design ...


0

If you're making the infographic for both web and print then yes you will need 2 files. That may be an export to a jpg and PDF, that depends on the type of graphic it is and what the printer wants. The web file will be RGB and the print file CMYK. If the client has asked you to include his contact information on the footer, then you must redesign the ...


0

They are all the same profile. The name of the profile is sRGB IEC61966-2.1. The other labels are just where they are set: Working RGB says your program is using that RGB mode. Yes you can work in a space that does not reflect the document setting. Document RGB says the document is specifying that RGB mode. They are all the same profile though and result ...


0

Also RGB is small clusters/pixels of color on a backlit computer screen, you rely on the light to give you the luminosityand the lack of light to give you the darks. Your process color CMYK as in your inks rely on white paper to give you luminosity and the mix of ink to create the dark hues effectively killing the white paper and so the luminosity. Also ...


0

If you plan to prepare a project for printing, go straight to CMYK mode and calibrate your color as the first step. Color correction should be the first step since you might need to choose the layout's Pantones or CMYK colors that fit with or is from your pictures... Usually in the printing industry, this is the first step because all the material ...


0

Additionally: Make sure you use a Rich Black; a mix of the Cyan-Magenta-Yellow and 100% Black. It creates a very dark black. If you only use a black at 100% in the CMYK values, it may look a bit gray. Don't use the hex color #000000 or RGB Red-Green-Blue values for you printed projects and colors; that's not a black for printing. Refer to this question ...


4

You may remember me from "You'll never get that RGB color in CMYK!" Now, you said you wanted something darker than Cyan70 +Yellow100: You don't have much choice to darken your color and keep it bright, you need to add more Cyan! Try C75 + Y100 and keep adding your cyan until you are satisfied. Forget about your RGB green, and work with the good old color ...


5

They look "dull" only because you compare a luminous color with an ink. When you look at magazines and find the colors very bright, they're still in CMYK-only most of the time. Usually designers who prepared these layouts didn't do anything special besides using the right CMYK values! To use your terms, yes you are "doomed". But the way you compare the 2 ...



Top 50 recent answers are included