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1

I can't think of a reason for this behavior to affect multiple layers and be sensitive both to increases and decreases in the red color. I tried several different ideas but was not able to reproduce this, so I'm thinking Photoshop just got confused somewhere along the line. The first thing, then, would be to Save As, then quit Photoshop completely. Reopen ...


0

If you set the bit depth too low, you'll only be able to produce a couple of reds. Your red channel is probably not RGB 16 in that layer.


6

RGB color is for light-producing situations, and is additive, which means that you are adding light of one color to light of another color, resulting in more light and a mixed color. CMYK color is for light-absorbing situations, and is subtractive, which means that you are absorbing light instead of reflecting it, and mixing two pigments results in ...


7

RGB is a color space that can only exist with projected light. It's physically impossible to replicate it on paper, which is a reflected light color space. So no, no printing press can 'print RGB'. At best, prepress RIP software can convert from RGB to CMYK. In fact, this is what most prepress software workflows do. How they convert to CMYK can vary ...


3

Blend modes will give very unexpected results in CMYK if you're used to working with them only in RGB. If the purpose of the PSD is only to provide a transparency mask, why not create a PSD consisting only of the (alpha channel) luminosity values and place that instead? You could create that very quickly with Image > Calculations, using the gray values ...


3

When working with CMYK form the beginning in Photoshop does not always allow you to work with some specific techniques and blend modes the same way. If you are doing something more simplistic that does not have a lot of lighting effects for example this will be fine. Also RGB has a larger color range than CMYK and when you convert your colors will become ...


1

DigiKam and Gimp are applying slightly different algorithms to their rendering of the image. Without testing, it's impossible to say which one (or both) is in error, but that is certainly the case. If the contrast levels match when one is set to use Perceptual and the other Relative Colorimetric rendering, then the most likely explanation is that one of ...


1

If your PSD contains any vector information, don't place it in the InDesign layout. Save as a PDF instead, and place the PDF. The reason for this is that a placed PSD is always a raster image in InDesign, because Id uses the raster layer that Photoshop saves within the PSD. A PDF retains all the vector information and makes it available to InDesign. A quick ...


2

I usually start by working in CMYK mode if I intend to use the file for print. As you have noticed screens can't replicate CMYK colours exactly but InDesign/Photoshop etc tries to emulate them. There is certainly going to be variations between what you see and what gets printed. I suggest you spend a bit of resources getting a Pantone swatch book so you ...



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