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49

I just fit the artboard to the objects I want: Select desired objects. Object -> Artboards -> Fit to Selected Art ctrl+alt+shift+s to open the Save for Web dialog. ctrl+z to undo fit.


23

Interlaced image loads an early degraded version of the whole image as soon as possible and then progressively renders the image to clear state. Non-interlaced image will load up in tiles showing clear image in each tile as it progresses to load in the image. .gif follows the same idea. For .jpg the interlaced = progressive and not interlaced = ...


21

The full path is C:\Program Files\Adobe\Adobe Photoshop CS6 (64 Bit)\Required\Plug-Ins\File Formats. Unless it's in File Formats, it won't show up in the export options.


19

You could use slices. You could set up artboards for each object. Or just adjust the artboard to fit only the object you want to export and then tick the "clip to artboard" option when saving/exporting. You could hide everything you don't want to export first: Select All Shift-click the art you want to export Choose Object > Hide from the menu Export ...


18

Any time a format isn't available in the Save As dialog, it means that format is invalid for the document in the state it's in. There's no such thing (as Lese and cwedge point out), as a 32-bit (or 16-bit) jpeg, nor a duotone, Lab or 1-bit bitmap jpeg. Photoshop versions prior to CS5 would simply not show jpeg as an available option for 16-bit images, which ...


13

Choice of the best compression method depends on your image content. If you're trying to save image with a lots of colors and smooth transitions between them, your choice would rather be JPEG. Otherwise, if you've got some lineart, text, image with a couple of colors you should try PNG instead. Specific compression scheme, parameters, color reduction etc. ...


10

If you're using a version of Photoshop earlier than CS6 and your document is 16-bit, or if it is in a color mode such as Lab or multichannel that isn't supported in jpeg format, then jpeg won't be offered as an option on save. Image > Mode > RGB Color Image > Mode > 8 Bits/Channel Then Save As. One of the much-welcomed features in CS6 (or ...


9

You can create your own script if you want, here's a simple one: main(); function main(){ var Name = app.activeDocument.name.replace(/\.[^\.]+$/, ''); var Ext = decodeURI(app.activeDocument.name).replace(/^.*\./,''); if(Ext.toLowerCase() != 'psd') return; var Path = app.activeDocument.path; var saveFile = File(Path + "/" + Name ...


8

Here are some options: Use another format other than JPEG (PNG or GIF); the results in terms of both file size and image quality will depend on the content of your image; each is better at certain kinds of content Make the image smaller in terms of pixels - this will have a very significant effect and should definitely be considered if you have control ...


8

Although the question was asked about Adobe Photoshop, the behavior is due to the lossy JPEG format and would be similar with any image editor. Cropping a JPEG can make it less compressible, especially when the x and y offsets of the cropped area are odd numbers. This causes a re-subsampling of the color channels that can make the cropped image more complex ...


7

Simply save/export a PNG24 image using Adobe Photoshop which contains transparency. Transparency is the remaining 8 bits. 24Bit PNG = 8 bits red, 8 bits blue, 8 bits green 32bit PNG = 8 bits red, 8 bits blue, 8 bits green, 8 bits alpha Photoshop automatically creates a 32bit PNG image if you save a 24Bit PNG that contains transparent areas.


7

There is no simple answer - each compression event dumps some data, it tends to dump less with subsequent saves as most of the disposable data has already been disposed of. Factors include the compression level, the size of the image, it's content, your personal threshold of "noticeable" and the quality of your monitor.


6

When saving, Illustrator uses the name of your document. If you create "Untitled-1", "Untitled-2", "Untitled-3", then those are the names it will use when saving. When you create a new document, specify a name (it's at the top of the New Document dialog, above artboard/document settings). Illustrator will then use this name for files it generates. Edit ...


6

This is a product of using diagonal lines on a grid (which is essentially what a PNG is: a grid of pixels). Here's a diagonal line on a grid. Each of the squares represents a pixel, greatly enlarged here. Some pixels need to be only partially coloured. It's not possible to colour a pixel like this. It needs to be all one colour. Without anti-aliasing, ...


6

When applying anti-aliasing in the Save for Web & Devices panel the entire export gets the same anti-aliasing method but you can apply the anti-alisaing on an object level. Select an object and go to Effect > Rasterize.... Choose your desired ppi, it is better to always choose Use Document Raster Effects Resolution because then it will be easy to ...


6

It's hard to know where to start, because I don't know your level of computer knowledge, which platform you work with or what tools you're using to design with, but here are some basics: The main thing is to start categorizing things. Assets, Clients and Projects are separate categories that each subdivide into subcategories. Keep like things with like, and ...


6

I've seen a video featuring this. I'm not sure what it was anymore, but check out these 3 videos (from YouTube and Vimeo): (The images aren't hyperlinked. Instead, there are linked texts at the bottom of each.) 1-Jpeg degradation by Connecticut State Library 2-JPG artifact test 1000 saves by Martin Flucka 3-Generation Loss by hadto This last one by ...


6

If you really are sensitive to the quality then you should avoid jpeg. You allready lost quality when the original image was saved as jpeg, nothing brings this quality back. In general you should avoid saving your documents out to jpeg unless your shipping the images off somewhere in their final form. Its hard to say wether the quality suffers much at all, ...


5

I'm not sure if this applies in CS6, but the method that I've been using in CS4 & 5 is just to create my 16px x 16px Favicon, then Save for Web. I save as either a .png or .jpg depending on the background, but when it asks for filename, I just add the .ico, like favicon.ico. Favicons work just fine. I only use this for creating Favicons so I'm not ...


5

To a degree..... With the exception of Live Type, Photoshop creates vector containers with raster fills. What this means is the edges of shape layers will remain crisp and clear when resized because the shape/vector layer edge is saved as a vector and it is recalculated when resized. However, what is inside the shape layer is not vector. For example, if ...


5

"Interlacing" means that it draws (I'm pulling numbers out of the air) every fifth line (line 5, 10, 15), then every fourth line (line 4, 9, 14), then every third line, etc. until the image is filled in, rather than drawing line 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc. in order. This allows a sketchy version of the image to come in gradually and fill in until it's completed. ...


5

Save for Web removes all proprietary data from the file resulting in smaller file sizes. Simply saving as PNG will include hidden proprietary data, like meta data for the creation app, app version, time created, etc. Save for web should always result in smaller file sizes.


5

Before delivering your final website design, you really should optimise the images with tools that are more focused towards and dedicated to optimising images. Photoshop does okay, but I've seen many people comment that other tools do a better job. From what I hear, ImageMagick is pretty good for this purpose. However, as a command-line-noob I need to spend ...


5

Apparently it is a relic from the days of experimentation in the Adobe labs. It is not recommended to use higher than 10 on that scale, it may actually lower the quality of the image or substantially bloat the file size. It would be a welcome change if Adobe removed that experimental extension of the scale.


4

You probably have the color mode set to 32-bit per channel, but it's hard to tell without knowing what the 5 displayed formats are. If that is the case: first rasterize the layers, then change Image|Mode from 32 bits per channel to 16 bits per channel. Save As then includes JPEG but with a warning that you can ignore; just save it.


4

eps is the standard, and the process is as simple as choosing eps from the Save As menu. It's been the standard for this sort of thing (final asset delivery) for longer than I've been in the industry, is understood by basically all vector design software, and is very similar to Illustrator's native format (the original post script format eps is based on was ...


4

Ensure your document is 8-bit RGB. (Image > Mode) If that doesn't help, hold down the Option/alt key and choose File > Save as... this will save a copy and remove any non-png allowed formatting. Chances are there's simply something about the image which is not allowed in the PNG format. However, using File > Save for Web should allow PNG saving in ...


4

I would recommend you don't use the maximum size allowed, and instead go for something a bit smaller instead. Depending on how complex your image is, a bigger size will definitely require a loss in quality. Your true limit in this case is the 127Kb. My reasoning is: You should aim for the maximum quality you can get without passing that weight. So if you ...


4

Presumably you are just pasting the graphic into the document. There are a few alternate methods to reduce the filesize: Option 1: Use File → Place... Instead of pasting the raster image into your document, use File → Place.... This will create linked files in your document: It's important to note that your .ai file will no longer be self-contained. If ...


4

Go to File > Export from Illustrator and choose "PSD" as your file type.



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