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9

(upgraded comment to answer) Scott, brendan and tim human all provide good advice regarding scanners. I actually do a lot of work with paintings and drawings, and photographing them is almost always a better option than scanning. I have a low-end professional flatbed scanner on my desk, but I almost never use it anymore because I get better results in less ...


8

If you have control over the scanning, or can get them rescanned, increase the contrast setting in the scan and set the black point at the darkest bit of text you can find. That would make the steps below easier. If not, read on... Here's part of a fairly typical old document scan: The details will be different depending on the document (this has ...


7

Without resorting to much trickery I would use colored pencil for the sketching. Lets say you'd use for example a blue pencil for sketching and your regular black ink for line work. Then you can use (top menu) Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Black & White or Image > Adjustments > Black & White And slide the Blues and/or Cyans ...


7

If you look at the levels of your scan, you can see that it is scanned too bright. Ideally the range of color information goes from almost black to almost white. Try to change brightness settings on your scanner and avoid "helpers" like sharpening oder presets for text scans


6

Lollero's suggestion is a good one. It doesn't help much if everything's gray and black, however. Here is a technique that takes a little finesse and some practice, but is your best general approach without changing your initial workflow: Scan in the usual way, and use a Levels adjustment layer to make the inking fully black (RGB 0,0,0) by dragging the ...


5

There is no way automated digital way to completely eliminate the pencil lines without doing some damage to the quality of the ink lines. However, it is possible to get close—probably close enough that you could manually fix the problems in a few minutes using a graphics tablet. Looking at the sample image, it appears that there are two characteristics that ...


5

Photoshop can help. If you ensure that there is an overlap between the various tiles of the scanning procedure you can then use File > Automate > Photomerge. It will analyze the files you give it and identify common pixels and reposition/overlap the art as it sees fit. With a little care during the scanning process, it can make stitching the tiles together a ...


5

I work with digital painting and coloring of hand-drawn lineart, and I have had the issue where halftoning occurs if you scan printed lines, or in some cases you get a slight artifact from the inkbleed on inked lineart or graphite smudge of pencils. In those cases, I'm trying to get a black and white representation of the lineart, so I find that using a ...


5

Most vector illustration programs (Adobe Illustrator, Inkscape, Corel Draw, etc.) have auto-trace features that allow you to bring in your raster scan to have converted. Will it convert things into geometric shapes? Probably not.


5

If you have access to Photoshop, try the Magic Wand tool to select the background around the writing, and fiddle with the Tolerance to get it as close to the writing as possible, then delete or fill with white. Another method is to use Image > Adjustments > Selective Colour - With Selective Colour you can tweak the thresholds of each colour, so in ...


5

There are lots of methods to achieve what you want in Photoshop. You can use a non-destructive method such as a layered Gradient Map. Simply create a new adjustment layer from Layer > New Adjustment Layer > Gradient Map... Choose the Black to White Gradient and adjust the gradient stops accordingly. Make sure that the adjustment layer is on top of the ...


5

You mention Photoshop, but in case you are interested there's also a GIMP plugin that does advanced grayscale cleaning and processing: Removes speckles Fills white pores on black ink Removes specific user defined shapes Has damaged lineart regeneration Topological decomposition It's called Nuvola Tools, and it's mainly focused on scanned art, but you ...


4

This looks like a photo, so I'll treat is as one. You are doing few things wrong here. You should've used plain white paper instead of one that has lines. You should've used proper/better lighting, perhaps a light directed right into the paper, but the more sunlight, the better it is. It doesn't take more than common sense to know that less lines ...


4

This really is too broad. But broad recommendations can be given for a broad problem ... Resolution considerations In general terms 300ppi for print 72 for web More every day for mobile and tablet (the highest right now is 433ppi, I believe). The catch is that your resolution is output size. If you can guess the final crop and dimensions and intended ...


4

My "professional" approach would be to vectorize the whole thing. This would not be a trivial task and would require lots of time and dedication. If you're not familiar with the process, I think this would be a good project to learn with. Since you mentioned that you're eager to learn new skills, I'd give it a shot if I were you. You talked about the use of ...


4

Let me outline another approach I find useful especially in the context of a signature for letters or PDF documents. We can quite easily create a vector graphic from a scanned original signature. This can be done with a variety of applications. Here is how I made it using Inkscape. Import the bitmap into an empty document (select "embed"). Select the ...


4

In your case you need to break regularity of your letters to look more like printed raster. I worked with your current image, if you will have higher resolution, you will need to adjust effect settings accordingly. Copy you letters in a new file Double the image size (it will add some blur, which is good) Add effect. Filter -> Pixelate -> ...


3

Check your scanner's settings. One of the purposes of scanning is to get text documents in, and for those to look good when scanned some scanners will tend to up the contrast and do some kind of sharpening to help get that sharp black-and-white look. If you are able to get into the preferences, try to find things like Exposure or Sharpening and just play ...


3

Are they line drawings or shaded drawings? If they're line drawings, the most common method is to scan as Black and White, trace the artwork using the pen tool (or freehand strokes with a brush) on a different layer, and work from there. If it's shaded drawings, she should consider scanning either as greyscale (for black and white drawings) or full color ...


3

All you need to do is choose Image > Adjustments > Levels and alter the levels within the image. Simply drag the left triangle (black) to the right to darken the dark areas and then drag the right (white) arrow to the left to lighten the lighter areas on the image. Viewing the histogram will help. It shows the ramp on the right which is all the ...


2

I am not sure if I understand what is exactly asked... ;) But... In a way, it depends on how you draw, to answer the first part of your answer. I have several styles or "moods", and certainly when I detail more, even while Potrace does (if you handle it right) an amazing job, it's always a vectorizer,there's almost always a trade-off: accuracy or way too ...


2

For total accuracy, you would have to use actual Pantone color swatches, as e100 says. If the magazine is more than a year or two old, then that level of accuracy becomes a bit academic because the original colors will have changed due to fading. You can get "in the ballpark" fairly easily, though, with Photoshop. Open the scanned document in Photoshop. ...


2

No, I don't believe there is. Apart from anything else, the scan is an RGB abstraction of the actual printed colour. What you would normally do is compare the original printed item with Pantone's own printed Colour Guides, and find a match by eye. Additionally, if you are talking about a regular magazine page, I don't think the Pantone device would ...


2

Using Photoshop this usually does the trick: Scan in RGB or Grayscale whatever you prefer and also depending on the sketches Paper won't be completely white and you may have non-sharp edges of your sketches. Use either Image > Adjustments > Levels or Image > Adjustments > Curves. Adjust to desired result (make sure you'll look at 100% crop instead of ...


2

As mentioned above, there are a some things to take into consideration before scanning. Are they just line art? or are they shaded? or are they in color? Line art = Scan as black and white Shaded = Scan as greyscale or color then desaturate in Photoshop Color = Scan in color I try to always scan at 300dpi that way if you need it for print later, you ...


2

Here are two techniques you can use in Photoshop, commonly used for exactly this kind of situation. They give different results, so pick the one that achieves what you're looking for. A basic thing to keep in mind is that marker strokes (including the texture of the paper than is usually visible) are really just a form of noise. In this type of situation, ...


2

I would recommend using Adobe Illustrator for this, if you have access to it. Simply Live Trace the image (Object>Live Trace>Tracing Options) and adjust the settings there until it looks the best. I would reduce the number of output colors to match the number of colors in your original image. Once you are done live tracing the image, you may need to convert ...


2

Vectorizing can be a fairly labor-intensive task. As mentioned there is an auto trace feature in Illustrator, but that itself usually requires some tweaking once it does the trace. You'd achieve the best results by using your sketch as a background image that you trace using the conventional tools. The trace function may give you a starting point. It won't ...


2

If you can keep consistent lighting in the photographs, for example, by having the same light point at the table and place the camera somewhere so you know you can always shoot the image in the same conditions, you could record Curves or Levels Action to do this (I would suggest Curves, since you want to have pretty exact results.) Then you could just open ...



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