Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Its a break, and has many forms. It comes form the drafting standards. For example were you to draw a shaft it might be uninteresting to see the 1000 mm of similar shaft, so to conserve paper you can indicate that the line or shape has been broken into pieces. Image 1: Variations on a theme the bottom right one needs a change to dimension line as well, ...


11

Looking it up from a CAD / Architecture perspective it can be found referred to as Break Point or Break Line. The Alphabet of Lines (PDF) has it as Break Lines: Note the jagged break line to indicate that this is only part of the object. In technical drawings it is as I tried to describe in comments depicted like this via Lines (pdf) though they ...


4

No, unless the work is for a scientific or technical publication. In that case, it would be accompanied by explanatory text, which a usual design would not. Since we're not going to be around to explain the weird shape you put in your design ("No, really. It's a raindrop!") to everyone who sees the finished piece, designers stick with what is recognized, not ...


3

I'd hazard a guess that in 99.5% of uses such as this those flourishes are not drawn or created. Rather they are decorative glyphs found in any number of fonts. Here's one such font: http://www.myfonts.com/search/fleurons/fonts/ Simply pick the glyph you want and set it like you would any type character. If you really want to draw your own, it simply ...


2

If the client gives absolutely no clues as to what they want, except "something flash", then your only way would be to show them some examples. Start with the things you like yourself. Show them some quick sketches you did, or some work you found on the internet. This way they could push you in the right direction, and hopefully specific enough for you to ...


2

Perhaps this answer is too simplistic...?


2

I don't believe there's anything automated to rotate a vertical tile around it's center. You'd have to manually copy and rotate. You could use the Transform Again function in the Edit menu, but it would still be fairly tedious. My suggestion is to draw 2 circles, then apply an Outer Glow Layer Style to the inner circle. If you need the inner circle to ...


2

It would be fairly straight forward in Illustrator although not automated. You could draw the paths with the Pen Tool however you want them. Then draw a small circle and place it at the intersections. Conversely, you could place your dots wherever you want them, then use the Pen Tool to draw lines between the dots. There's nothing automatic or "magic ...


1

Using Illustrator: Draw a rectangle with a certain color. Draw an ellipse behind it, with the same color but with transparency set to 0%. Select both and choose Object > Blend > Make. The default setting seems to be a bit tight. With the object still selected, choose Object > Blend > Blend Options. Switch Preview on to see what you are doing. Select ...


1

Those specific ornaments are part of Bickham Script Pro, which either came with your copy of InDesign (if you have a perpetual license version) or can be installed from Typekit (if you're on Creative Cloud). Many OpenType typefaces include ornaments. To find them, use the Glyphs panel (Type > Glyphs) and use the dropdown selector to view "Ornaments" and ...


1

Select all. Grab the Live Paint Bucket Tool Click once to create Live Paint Group Pick a swatch color click where you want that color. When everything is colored, click the Expand button in the control bar across the top of the screen.


1

To make a united object we may select Path > Union Ctrl+ after we had selected the objects we wanted to unite. Gaps between objects will remain visible in the united objects. Therefore we have to remove any gaps before we proceed. This can be done in several ways, depending on the precision we need for the objects or their surroundings: Move objects ...


1

Select your shape and switch to edit path by nodes. Create two new nodes on the border of your shape where you want to detach it by double clicking at the respective position. Select those nodes and break path at selected nodes. Path → Break Apart. If this produces more than two objects, deselect the part you want to detach and Path → Combine. If you want ...


1

Yes, check out this video on how to draw a Pie Graph: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qsjh79E4S-o



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible