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10

Sorry about this, but I have just found the answer to my problem: Given this, I then created my own using Adobe Illustrator (seen in the following image). The outermost circle I used as one unit (in my case, 100 px diameter). Thanks anyway.


9

Working from your example which has two paths, I'll call the path on the left "path 1" and the path on the right "path 2". Ensure that path 2 is overlapping path 1 at the intersections, even if ever so slightly. Select path 2, and choose Edit > Duplicate. The duplicate of path 2 will now be placed on top of everything and selected. Keep it selected. ...


5

After reading your question again, I was answering a little more broadly with that last answer and assuming you would want to create more complex shapes in the future. If you are really just wanting to create a triangle with two rounded corners, and you are using Illustrator CC, check this out: create a triangle. select the bottom left corner's ...


5

Looks like a few circles might do the trick for this. I just made mine up so it's not perfect but the technique should work all the same. Once you have the circles where you want them, you need to add new points to the paths where the lines intersect (or you can also use Divide in the pather finder)and then delete what you don't need. Use the join and ...


5

Most likely, the result must be an extruded profile (or parallel projection). Of course we wouldn't use the extrude tool in Illustrator. All you have to do is to draw your profile (the B's) and copy it to give the extrusion effect you want the extrusion amount will be (the A's). This Projection called Axonometric projection where it is a type of parallel ...


4

Use the rectangle tool U. Draw the shape. Get the pen tool out and "add anchor point tool" under the pen tool options P. Place it in the bottom center of the rectangle. Get the direct selection tool A and click on the new anchor point and drag upwards.


4

This is a problem with inDesign that many users suffer from! Here is a detailed tutorial on how to fix this issue so that the dimensions are measured just like illustrator. http://www.nineteenfortyone.com/2011/05/indesign-dimensions-include-stroke-weight/ The trick is to set the "Dimensions include Stroke Weight" setting within the software.


4

Select the path you want to edit. Use the Scissors tool and click on the path at both ends of the gap you'd like to create. Then use the Selection tool (black arrow tool) to click the portion to remove and click delete. Before After Tip: Adding guides to the document to help guide you on where to apply the Scissors is a good idea, too, but not ...


4

Convert to work path is simply the wrong tool here. Pixel data to path data conversion is not a perfect process. Its a image trace which is also known as a curve fitting. Expecting it to be perfect is the problem here. Use shape tools instead of converting from selections.


4

Make sure there is not simply another object in front of your shape. Raise to top to see if that's the case Make sure it actually has a fill and/or stroke Make sure the opacity of fill and stroke is not 0 If the stroke/fill color is a gradient, make sure that it does not end outside of the shape Make sure the layer is visible Make sure the layer ...


4

You can achieve this using a combination of smart filters & clipping masks. First create all the shapes you want to use as blurred areas and add them to a new group With the background image you want blurred selected go to Filters -> Convert for Smart Filter. This will convert the image to a smart object and allow you to apply filters ...


4

This effect is referred to as "low-poly." The name comes from 3D models with a low number of polygons. Search for low poly and you will find a lot of examples, tutorials, etc. as this style has been somewhat in vogue lately.


3

It would definitely be easier to do in Illustrator, since there you can use Stroke, which then can be expanded to Fill. But here's how I would do this in Photoshop Notice: You'll need “Corner Editor” script by @shadowxaf Using Polygon Tool with 6 sides () create two shapes (use Shift to align it properly): Apply rounded corner to the first polygon ...


3

Illustrator is much more efficient when creating custom shapes but if you want to use Photoshop I suggest you try the following script: Download this script: Corner Editor Move "Corner Editor.jsx" to "/Presets/Scripts/" in the Photoshop directory. Re-open Photoshop Create your shape using the Polygon Tool (U) run the script: "File -> Scripts -> Corner ...


3

Basic question, but we all started out learning too. And im sure others can benefit from an instructional here. To make a compound path in illustrator when your desired shape can be made of of two or more other shapes you use the pathfinder. Your two shapes are a triangle and a rounded-rectangle. To access pathfinder select Widows >> Pathfinder ...


3

I would say it most closely resembles a teardrop shape. That's what it's referred to as within Microsoft PowerPoint: Screenshot courtesy of indezine.com Photoshop has a similar (yet not exactly the same) shape, they call it a raindrop.


3

This might be a little challenging if you aren't used to using Illustrator's Pen tool or working with paths in general, but here's one way to do it. Draw a circle. With the Ellipse tool selected, hold Shift and drag to draw your circle (shift will constrain your proportions and make it perfectly round) Add four extra points to your circle. Select the Pen ...


3

Create a square. Create a semicircle with the same diameter: Create a circle. Move the round control in the circle tool to make it a semicircle, with the straight side being perfectly horizontal and facing downwards. Select your square, copy, select your semicircle, edit → paste size → paste width. Be sure to have the proportion lock activated (the ...


3

I believe the Shape Builder tool is probably the closest thing you'll get for what you're trying to accomplish as far as a time-saving method goes. Here's a demonstration: Note: This will create one shape and will not allow you to keep each letter on a separate layer. If you prefer to keep each letter on a separate layer, you can instead select all the ...


3

Ensure that your shapes are expanded 'Object' > 'Expand Appearance'. Seems to me like the rounded corners aren't "commited" to the objects.


3

Use a line instead of a shape, lines can have round ends. Relevant Adobe Help Document


3

You may need to settle for increased or decreased luminance of the area covered by the rectangle. Blur requires pixel-pushing. If luminance variation is acceptable, do the following: Put a new layer above the background Fill it with either white or black Change its opacity to suit the need and taste In the sample below, the white rectangle has 50% ...


3

Create object and shrinked object of the same object. Blend specified steps. That will create a blend. Draw a Circle. Select blend object and circle. Go to object, blend and replace spine.


3

I am guessing you are trying to achieve the result below??! To achieve this, you only need the blend tool. First start with the two objects (your starting point and your end point). Position them so they are overlapping. Select both objects and select Object > Blend > Make. Now create an empty circle from the rotation point, with a black stroke. make ...


2

Although it might be best to do it in illustrator you can: First make a rectangle Then rasterize the layer Use the select tool to select a square and press delete, this should give you one half of the square bracket. You can then Duplicate the layer On one of the layers press Ctrl + T to transform the shape and then right click and press Flip Horizontal ...


2

This is a result of your stroke alignment set to center and miter joins. In the Stroke options panel, there is a "Limit" value (short for miter limit). Setting this to 0 will remove the "strange object parts". To add the desired sharp corners back in, add a third border triangle:


2

Ok, I actually managed to fix it myself! After hours of trying, apparently writing the problem down helped me to think around the problem. Not sure why it didn't occur to me before, I used the magic wand to make the 'blanking' semi-circle transparent and voila! Thanks to those who gave this any thought.


2

It works nearly the same. Select the points you want to rotate as you would in photoshop with the white direct selection tool (hit A). Then select the Rotate Tool (hit R). Grab a point and rotate. Tips: If you click once you will move the rotate pivot there. If you alt click it moves the pivot there and opens up a dialog for typing exact values. ...


2

Its just linear interpolation of point positions. Here is a quick illustrator script example: #target illustrator var sel = app.activeDocument.selection; if (sel.length === 2){ if(sel[0].typename == "PathItem" && sel[1].typename == "PathItem") { for (var incr=-0.4; incr < 1.5; incr += 0.2){ if (incr != 0 ...


2

The Pathfinder is your friend, for things like this. Starting with my two paths (rectangle and star). Make sure the object that you want to punch out is on top of the object you want to make the hole in. Open your Pathfinder (Window > Pathfinder). I like to keep mine pinned to the toolbar on the right, because it gets used a lot. Make sure that both ...



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