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14

Start by drawing a circle using the Circle tool, whilst holding down Ctrl Turn on "Snap to object centre" & "Snap to rotation centre" and create guides that snap to the centre of the circle With the circle tool and circle still selected, you can calculate the arc length you desire by expressing it as a percentage fraction X 360. i.e. (25/100)*360 ...


10

Sorry about this, but I have just found the answer to my problem: Given this, I then created my own using Adobe Illustrator (seen in the following image). The outermost circle I used as one unit (in my case, 100 px diameter). Thanks anyway.


8

Working from your example which has two paths, I'll call the path on the left "path 1" and the path on the right "path 2". Ensure that path 2 is overlapping path 1 at the intersections, even if ever so slightly. Select path 2, and choose Edit > Duplicate. The duplicate of path 2 will now be placed on top of everything and selected. Keep it selected. ...


7

This has to do with the algorithm that InkScape and other graphics programs use to create gradients, namely (pseudo-code): var gradient = [] var firstColor, secondColor, steps for i in range(steps): p = i/steps R = firstColor.R * p + secondColor.R * (1 - p) G = firstColor.G * p + secondColor.G * (1 - p) B = firstColor.B * p + secondColor.B * (1 - p) ...


6

Most likely, the result must be an extruded profile (or parallel projection). Of course we wouldn't use the extrude tool in Illustrator. All you have to do is to draw your profile (the B's) and copy it to give the extrusion effect you want the extrusion amount will be (the A's). This Projection called Axonometric projection where it is a type of parallel ...


6

I recommend doing this in a vector program. For my demo I am doing this in Illustrator. Draw the background square. Draw some paths that will separate the square. I then gave the paths a stroke and stroke width of 4. Pick a number for how much space you want from each object. I then selected all of the strokes and went to Object -> Expand, and expanded ...


5

Make sure there is not simply another object in front of your shape. Raise to top to see if that's the case Make sure it actually has a fill and/or stroke Make sure the opacity of fill and stroke is not 0 If the stroke/fill color is a gradient, make sure that it does not end outside of the shape Make sure the layer is visible Make sure the layer ...


5

You can use Illustrators drawing modes to achieve this without the need for clipping masks. Draw the shape you want to use as the base shape. Select the appropriate drawing mode from the tools panel (below the color selector) Anything you draw or paste will now be clipped by the base shape you selected (depending on the drawing mode selected). The ...


5

You can get good results if you use 3 lines for the blend! You are right that the blend tool does not work for this with closed shapes. But you really only need it to look closed. I made a quick example to show you: As you can see on the left I drew 3 lines. The blue and the green one are drawn in a way that they seem to be one closed shape. The line ...


5

What I did: Create each wave with white to transparent gradient in different layers (maybe solid fill works better) Each layer is set as "Soft Light" Layer order does matter, play around which ones should go on top of which till you get the effect desired. Set varying opacity for the lighter ones I did it in all of 10 minutes I think. Hope it gives you ...


5

I assumed that would be a continuous path moving from one point to the next (as you mentioned stitching) but it looks like they are actually just a bunch of squares and triangles, rotated around a common center. In which case... Draw a sqaure: Use a transform effect (Effect → Distort & Transform → Transform... ) with a rotation and a number of ...


4

Use Illustrator's Blend Outline your type (Type → Create Outlines) If needed, ungroup the paths and/or release the compound path (Object → Ungroup / Object → Compound Path → Release) Use the Direct Selection Tool (A) to select the end paths and delete those segments. You should now have 2 separate paths. Set the blend options to 1 step (Object → Blend → ...


4

Convert to work path is simply the wrong tool here. Pixel data to path data conversion is not a perfect process. Its a image trace which is also known as a curve fitting. Expecting it to be perfect is the problem here. Use shape tools instead of converting from selections.


4

This effect is referred to as "low-poly." The name comes from 3D models with a low number of polygons. Search for low poly and you will find a lot of examples, tutorials, etc. as this style has been somewhat in vogue lately.


4

You could use this method in Illustrator: create a shape like this with your symbol Crop the selected area. select your croped object and go to Pattern Options (Window>Pattern Options) once the Pattern option tab opens up click the waffle and select Make Pattern A windows will pop up where you can navigate how the pattern should flow, ...


4

You can use scissors to cut part of the circle. Draw circle, select Edit mode, add two points, press Enter. Part between these two point we can delete later. Select Layer -> Paths -> Scissors Hover over part of the circle you want to delete, it will be dashed Cut it by left mouse click.


4

I suggest following workflow: make a white thin lined stroke and start drawing polygons edges with line tool. Make sure you have smart guides on but no align guides. make a small area of polygon edges. select all and switch to live paint bucket tool hide edge color alt click in middle of polygon to pick color click in polygon to color it Once you have done ...


3

I believe the Shape Builder tool is probably the closest thing you'll get for what you're trying to accomplish as far as a time-saving method goes. Here's a demonstration: Note: This will create one shape and will not allow you to keep each letter on a separate layer. If you prefer to keep each letter on a separate layer, you can instead select all the ...


3

I would go about it as follows (more of a visual then a geometrical approach): 1) using the bézier tool, draw a triangular shape as shown below with the left line perfectly vertical (use Ctrl while drawing) 2) Menu Edit > Clone > Create Clone, then with selection tool enabled, flip the clone horizontally (using the icon in the tool options above) and ...


3

Create a square. Create a semicircle with the same diameter: Create a circle. Move the round control in the circle tool to make it a semicircle, with the straight side being perfectly horizontal and facing downwards. Select your square, copy, select your semicircle, edit → paste size → paste width. Be sure to have the proportion lock activated (the ...


3

This might be a little challenging if you aren't used to using Illustrator's Pen tool or working with paths in general, but here's one way to do it. Draw a circle. With the Ellipse tool selected, hold Shift and drag to draw your circle (shift will constrain your proportions and make it perfectly round) Add four extra points to your circle. Select the Pen ...


3

I would say it most closely resembles a teardrop shape. That's what it's referred to as within Microsoft PowerPoint: Screenshot courtesy of indezine.com Photoshop has a similar (yet not exactly the same) shape, they call it a raindrop.


3

Ensure that your shapes are expanded 'Object' > 'Expand Appearance'. Seems to me like the rounded corners aren't "commited" to the objects.


3

Use a line instead of a shape, lines can have round ends. Relevant Adobe Help Document


3

You can achieve this using a combination of smart filters & clipping masks. First create all the shapes you want to use as blurred areas and add them to a new group With the background image you want blurred selected go to Filters -> Convert for Smart Filter. This will convert the image to a smart object and allow you to apply filters non-...


3

Create object and shrinked object of the same object. Blend specified steps. That will create a blend. Draw a Circle. Select blend object and circle. Go to object, blend and replace spine.


3

I am guessing you are trying to achieve the result below??! To achieve this, you only need the blend tool. First start with the two objects (your starting point and your end point). Position them so they are overlapping. Select both objects and select Object > Blend > Make. Now create an empty circle from the rotation point, with a black stroke. make ...


3

You may need to use scripting to create the pattern exactly. Both Sketch and Illustrator can be controlled via scripts You can find the formula and some sample rendering at Wolfram Alpha. If you pay for the pro subscription, you can also directly download the tiling bit of the pattern in multiple formats. Not really a complete answer, but hopefully this'll ...


3

Both items are probably used Shared styles, which means the properties are linked. To unlink just, on the right hand sude, under the object properties, choose "no shared style" under the styles dropdown



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