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80

As Elmo Allén correctly notes, this is neither an optical illusion not a bug in your graphics editor, but an effect caused by the monitor technology you're using. Specifically, on a typical modern TFT-LCD computer screen, each pixel is actually composed of three separate subpixels arranged side by side, respectively colored reg, green and blue: Each of ...


34

It is hard to make exactly what everyone sees here, because everybody has their own display to see the image. On my monitor, if I squint, I could see a very thin black line between the left red rectangle and the green middle rectangle. And in contrast, between the right red and middle, I see a very thin white line. Basically, I understand the original poster ...


15

Use the Polar Grid Tool. This is what it's for. Tap the ↑ arrow on the keyboard while dragging to add rings. Tap the ↓ arrow while dragging to remove rings. Tap → or ← arrows to remove or add dividing lines.


13

Updated example using a wedge design. For clarity, sample distances were added to the graph, and the text was removed. This example has the Start and Finish text, and probably only the Finish text is needed. Since small size is a factor for handheld, here are two 100px by 100px space saving options using a vertical layout, and gauge design. ...


12

If you want to make that with just two woven lines throughout, then no it's not possible. However, this object is very symmetrical, so we can take full advantage of that. To start, you should identify the simplest repeating object: In order to make the stroke overlap itself, we can use the Scissors tool to make a cut on the loop so that it now consists ...


11

Years ago I had an Amiga game called F19 Stealth Fighter. The HUD on this had something very similar to what you describe. For bombs that you dropped, rather than fired, you were shown a line with two 'posts' at each end getting closer together the nearer you got to a target. Here's a simple modern representation:


10

There are 2 main parts to this: Alignment and Size - other things like whitespace and shape are harder to objectively analyse but still important. As with most art and designs, balance is not exact, but a close approximation. Alignment Instead of aligning the bases or the centres of the "bounding box", objects are aligned by their centroid, show below. ...


8

Create the largest one. Then create the smallest one via Edit > Copy (Ctrl/Option+C) -> Edit > Paste in front (Ctrl/Option+F) -> scale down. Then select both objects, go to Object -> Blend and select specified steps.


8

As you have already selected the correct answer, this is for anyone who want to know the exact steps. Create your smallest circle using the ellipse tool, then create your biggest circle around it (copy the smaller circle then press ctrl+shift+v to paste in place and hold shift to scale up (On PC)); highlight the two and choose Object > Blend > Make ...


7

There are quite some different lens elements, I will show you how to make a convex element. Convex Make one ellipse, set it's line (stroke) color to black and the fill color to transparent: Copy it and place the copy such that they overlay each other: I've hatched the center part for illustrative purposes, in reality it will be white. The hatched ...


7

Create the circle shape. Remove the fill. Give it a stroke that is as thick as the width you want. Go to Object → Expand.. in the top horizontal menu. Create a rectangle that's as thick as you want the gaps to be. While you still have the rectangle selected, hold Shift and select the circle. Use the alignment options to center it horizontally and ...


7

This is most effectively achieved by offsetting the path of the front shape, and subtracting the resulting shape from all the shapes in the back, using the Pathfinder. As an example, say I'd like to do the outlining with the blue shape as my front shape: Select the blue shape with the Move tool (V); Choose Object > Path > Offset Path...; Key in an ...


7

I think the distance items work better and are far more intuitive, but I'd reverse things a a bit. Great distance should be long and red, short distance should be short and green. What you've posted seems to read the opposite of this. I'd expect long bars to be "far away" and be red. Without knowing your overall layout, another possibility maybe to use a ...


7

If you want to show the distance between two persons, it is probably most intuitive to show a distance between two persons. In the rough mockup below there is still some sort of bar, but it is pointing backward. Distance is shown by position (by moving the person to the right) and size (shrinking the person). When you want more of a barlike indicator, you ...


6

You could create end caps by creating custom arrowheads. It's a bit of a detailed process, or actually editing the right file can be confusing. Here is an Adobe TV video on creating custom arrowheads in Illustrator CC. Then simply apply the arrowhead to the strokes via the Stroke Panel. You could also create brushes with end caps (pattern brush) but ...


6

I ran into this exact same issue a while ago, also while drawing a bunch of small icons. Turns out you can do some pretty neat stuff with the "Blend if… This Layer" slider in the Layer Style panel: Dragging the right slider all the way to the left basically tells Photoshop, "keep everything I draw black opaque, and make everything white transparent". ...


6

Being Photoshop, there’s probably quite a few approaches to this problem, but only one I can think of that maintains full vector edited and scaling. There’s a few things going on here. Square is just a shape layer for the square. Nothing tricky there. The Blurry Circle group has a circle as a vector mask. The vector mask is set to subtract and also has ...


5

In Illustrator... Select it all, Pathfinder > Merge, click the red, hit delete. Or Select it all, grab the Shape Builder Tool, Hold down the Option/Alt and click-drag starting below the rings, to the center ring covered by red.


5

With the help of Pattern Brush you can do this in Adobe Illustrator. Select the sine waves you had made Drag these sine waves to Brush palette Select Pattern Brush and press OK Select Circle Click on sine waves pattern brush you just made


5

With Photoshop CS6, CC or CC2014 you can easily accomplish this with just a circle shape and the stroke features. Draw a circle Add anchor points where you want pieces cut out remove sections between anchors duplicate the layer for each different colored section you'll want delete sections from the copies for areas you do not want in that color. Here is ...


5

Create a circle. Convert Object to Path. Extensions → Modify Path → Add Nodes… Select by number of segments. In the example I chose five segments; you will likely want to choose a higher number. Create a symmetric trapezium. Select the trapezium and your circle and apply Extensions → Modify Path → Perspective. Remove trapezium. In the Nodes tool, ...


4

No question in my mind that the sample you've shown is hand drawn and not a 3D render or something. There are ways to make building something like this a little easier on yourself though. Draw a path, with a thick stroke and rounded end caps: Select the path, then go to Object > Path > Outline Stroke: Slide your original path over a bit and adjust it ...


4

As mentioned in chat, I'd normally do something like this: Create triangle (3 sided polygon, in Photoshop) Give triangle a stroke Create masks for corners (bottom ones 45 degrees to each side, you can hold Ctrl to make them rotate in intervals. masks in red in the image) But looking at it again, you could actually use another triangle mask to get the ...


4

In my testing here..... live Rounded rectangles do not scale their rounding at all. If you set the rounding to 10px, it stays at 10px no matter how you scale the shape. That's your issue. You've got a rounded rectangle there to meet the ellipses and the corner rounding doesn't scale at the same rate as the ellipses. You could adjust the rectangle rounding ...


4

Googling helps :) But I thought I'd answer the question myself so others can find the answer. You have to manually select the anchor points pertaining to the part of the shape you wish to resize. So, select the "direct selection" tool, click on the relevant anchor points (the small white squares on the corners of the shape, which should turn black once ...


4

You need to use the "delete segment" button. In the node tool, select the segment you want to remove. In the second line of the top toolbar, look for an icon that has two nodes connected with a line at the top, a down arrow, and two separate nodes at the bottom: This will disconnect the nodes without deleting them. Here is the result:


4

That's actually quite easy. There are two ways to do it: Using a mask (best way IMHO, as it gives you more flexibility / editing options): Import your image: Draw a circle that will mask your image: Move the circle behind the bitmap using the Backward toolbar icon: Use the circle to mask the bitmap, by selecting it and choosing Layer › Use as Mask ...


4

If you want extremely fast solution, grab Ellipse tool and select options as on the picture: If you want perfect solution you should use Pathfinder panel cutting the circle with a cross.


4

I give you another answer, but there are a lot of options. Create a circle (Elliple tool->Shift+Click+Drag) and make desired stroke (i.e. 23 points) Next, press Object->Expand Next grab Type tool and type "+", then press Object->expand and resize and locate the cross along the circle. Then select all the shapes and press Minus front on pathfinder ...


4

"I want to make the gray, green and blue part. It basically is a slightly altered rounded rectangle." That is not the best way to see it. You should look at it instead like you have a circle - maybe all in one color at first, that had a stroke but no fill. Then you use the "Add Anchor Point" tool to mark segments you want to cut out of it, and delete them. ...



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