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12

If you want to make that with just two woven lines throughout, then no it's not possible. However, this object is very symmetrical, so we can take full advantage of that. To start, you should identify the simplest repeating object: In order to make the stroke overlap itself, we can use the Scissors tool to make a cut on the loop so that it now consists ...


9

They're called Identicons, and they are typically generated based on a user's IP address. They're popular around the Internet largely because they're a default option for avatars in WordPress: And of course, they're on Stack Exchange as well! I did a quick search, and it seems like this site can generate Identicons. Not sure how copyright works and ...


7

After a quick 'Google' of socks (and a slightly irrational love of them) I noticed a couple of things that might help you. -Unless there is a fold in the top of the sock (the part above the ankle) the width of this section tends to be less than the length. -The heel and toes of a sock tends to be a bit of extra material making this part stick out so it ...


7

There are quite some different lens elements, I will show you how to make a convex element. Convex Make one ellipse, set it's line (stroke) color to black and the fill color to transparent: Copy it and place the copy such that they overlay each other: I've hatched the center part for illustrative purposes, in reality it will be white. The hatched ...


6

Adding to Brendan's answer, I think you'll find this question in meta.so interesting. SO, for example, uses Gravatar and specifies Identicons as the default image. An Identicon is a randomly generated assortment of shapes that is specific to a commenter’s email (or IP address). They were created by Don Parks, who said he originally came up with this idea ...


5

It is easy as usual! For that i will use Illustrator CS5. 1) Take a "Spiral Tool" 2) Now click on the screen and set some options for the spiral creation. Then click "OK" 3) A new spiral will be drawn: 4) Now transform the spiral: 5) Rotate and scale: 6) It will be look like this: 7) Take a "Reshape Tool" (the magic begins :) 8) ...


5

Dinesh, I have a solution for you, but it will require Photoshop CS 6 Extended or preferably, Photoshop CC. First, you'll need your vector artwork for the Man Of Steel logo. I grabbed (copy to pasteboard) mine from within Abduzeedo's source files for the following tutorial: http://abduzeedo.com/man-steel-symbol-illustrator-and-photoshop I created a new ...


4

Under the pen tool in the menu bar there is a tool called delete anchor points. You can also access this with the shortcut key - (minus). It allows you to remove anchor points without breaking the shape


4

No question in my mind that the sample you've shown is hand drawn and not a 3D render or something. There are ways to make building something like this a little easier on yourself though. Draw a path, with a thick stroke and rounded end caps: Select the path, then go to Object > Path > Outline Stroke: Slide your original path over a bit and adjust it ...


4

As mentioned in chat, I'd normally do something like this: Create triangle (3 sided polygon, in Photoshop) Give triangle a stroke Create masks for corners (bottom ones 45 degrees to each side, you can hold Ctrl to make them rotate in intervals. masks in red in the image) But looking at it again, you could actually use another triangle mask to get the ...


3

Different answers will work here; here's something I did in a matter of about a minute. Select the Polygon Tool (Click and hold the Rectangle Tool in the Tools palette if you're not sure how to get it) and click on the canvas; give a 20px radius and 6 sides and press Enter. Toggle Smart Guides (Ctrl + U) and select the Line tool (\ on the keyboard). Draw ...


3

It's because the shape is actually a fill with a layer mask (a vector mask) and when you hit delete on the layer it deletes the mask first. EDIT To address your comment: Photoshop simply does not do vector shapes like Illustrator, you can't create multiple shapes on the same layer and manipulate them individually. (At least not like you'd want to). Each ...


3

A similar approach can be taken in Photoshop, but here is one solution done in Illustrator: 1) Draw rectangle 2) Select rectangle > Effect > Stylize > Rounded Corners > ~10px 3) Select Direction Arrow (a) > Grab top right corner of rectangle holding shift to keep structure and create your desired angle 4) Select rectangle > Object ...


3

I tried to combine JennaDesign's Idea with your original approach. I think a striking heel shape can be enough and there should be as little colors as possible. Here is my sketch:


3

You are pretty much on the right track. You could do it like this: Create the triangle shape ( Or in your case, delete the second triangle, you only need one at this point ). Take Path selection tool and click the triangle once and press Shift + Alt + left arrow key. Left arrow key: Moves the path to the left Shift: Makes sure that the 1 Left arrow ...


3

Draw the shapes on paper Scan the drawings into whatever image editor you have If you were a designer, you'd probably next go into Illustrator and live trace the shapes to give you scalable vector objects. Since you're just creating a presentation, scans are likely to be good enough.


3

This is exactly why you want to use Illustrator as you can keep the strokes a certain width even as you scale. If you are serious about UI kit, I would put in the extra time to learn Illustrator. Your resizing shrinks everything along with the thickness of the lines. Your shape is not transparent, it just has really thin lines. You will need to deal with ...


3

I think the best way is to use Pattern Along Path under menu Path -> Path Effect Editor. In this way it's easier to edit. :) Here's the steps: Create a rectangle that looks like the one you want to deform Convert it to Path (menu Path => Object to Path) Copy it into the clipboard Create a bezier curve of the deformation Select the bezier curve and go to ...


3

Googling helps :) But I thought I'd answer the question myself so others can find the answer. You have to manually select the anchor points pertaining to the part of the shape you wish to resize. So, select the "direct selection" tool, click on the relevant anchor points (the small white squares on the corners of the shape, which should turn black once ...


2

The trouble you were running into is because of how you are cutting out your paths. Because you are using a group of paths and one compound path to cut out, Illustrator has to make an assumption about what color you want your fill to be of the compound path. It chose the orange because it had two options to choose from on the compound path and changes the ...


2

There are 2 ways to do this: First: Add a new shape (path) to an existing shape (path): 1. Select the shape (the path itself, not the layer) using the Path Selection Tool / Direct Selection Tool (shortcut: A). Select one of the shape tools (shortcut: U). Hit (Shift) and start dragging, this will add the new path to the already selected path. You can ...


2

The way to generate objects by color in Inkscape would be to trace the bitmap to vector paths. This is how I selected the color yellow of the sunflowers to add a white border to all sunflowers. File > Import bitmap (embed) to the Inkscape canvas: Wikimedia Select the bitmap and choose Path > Trace Bitmap...: In Mode tab choose Colors, and Smooth. Do ...


2

create a square add second one to the same path transform smaller square and angle it after add to the same shape 2 circles add 2 additional points with pen tool move anchor points subtract top circle the result repeat the same for right side


2

Join the end anchor points of the paths creating a corner, if that's what you want. (Object > Path...) Expand the strokes to shapes then using the Direct Selection tool, line up the sides of the shapes. (Object > Expand...) At times, setting the end caps of the strokes to rounded (in the Stroke Panel) will make the strokes appear to connect. This is ...


2

Select the shape path by using the Path Selection tool Once selected, copy the path with Ctrl/Cmd-C. You've now copied a path. Pasting this onto a shape layer will turn it back into a "shape", but pasting into a non-shape layer will just leave you with a path.


2

Since Illustrator CS5, these lens-shaped objects can be created in a ridiculously simple and quick way by modifying a thick stroke using the Width tool. This also has the advantage of keeping the result editable. Draw a path and give it an adequate stroke width (e.g. 10 pt), which will make for the base 'rectangle'. Choose the Width tool (Shift+W) from the ...


2

I don't think there is a rule, or even a suggestion about the size of rounded corners. That is purely aesthetic. There are two key things to consider though: Consistency. Standardize the radius over a project. Avoid mixing and matching rounded corners of various sizes without a good reason. Concentricity. By all means, make sure your corners stay ...


2

Go to File > New > Library and create a new library. Then you'll now have a library panel that you can add to the UI like any other panel in InDesign. You can then create a custom shape and simply drag it into this panel and it'll be added to your library. I just gave this a go in CS4 and it works just fine. I was able to create a new object, open a new ...


2

Id doesn't have the kind of built-in shape libraries that Ps has, but there's another way to go that should fit your needs. What works well, based on my own travails teaching InDesign, is to introduce them to Create Outlines on the Edit menu. It even has an easily memorable kbsc, Ctl-Shift-O/Cmd-Shift-O. Wingdings and Webdings are distributed with the OS, ...



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