Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

Ignoring the how old the onlooker might be, how high up, low down, indoors, artificial light or not, dark train stations, weather, is it a print sign or a screen, reflective road sign etc etc. There are a few tools that will help you calculate this, and there are some best practices. If you really want to get into this, your keyword will be signage. ...


7

Thinking outside the box on this; a simple triangle could represent Maslow's hierarchy of needs. I can't think of anything that would represent it better, that can also be captured and conveyed in such a simple icon. A simple triangle maybe with a few horizontal lines depending on its size would be a well thought out icon. It may be a little obscure but ...


6

There are too many variables for one answer. The first thing to evaluate is the typeface. If you are using a face designed for signage, the general references Ilan provided are probably roughly accurate. On the other hand, if you're working on a branded piece where the typography is part of a larger brand standard, you'll have to do your own research. The ...


5

Apparently, Wikimedia Commons considers it freely usable for all purposes, i.e. effectively in the public domain. Specifically, they base this on the wording on the Japanese Foundation for Promoting Personal Mobility and Ecological Transportation website (the "green man running through the door" sign was originally designed in Japan, by one Yukio Ota, ...


5

Please look at these resources Distance Legibility Chart additional explanation crazy resource also, you probably want to learn what the visual acuity is... If you want to calculate the proper 20/20 letter size based on distance you can use this formula: tan(5 minutes) = distance in feet/20 but it is not the BEST letter size, only the size that a ...


5

I found that just by changing two pixels in the middle of the second image to white, I could make it a lot more clear: Here they are at normal size: It's definitely a little better. So, you might do well just by scaling down Helvetica and then zooming in all the way to see what's making it fuzzy, and then fixing it from there. I didn't spend a lot of ...


2

Using icons for fuzzy concepts is hard. Most user will interpret them differently than intended. To test: design the icons and ask a few people their meaning. You'll be convinced to to add a label explaining the icon. With a label added, the meaning is clear but the need for the icon itself will be less. Of course the icon will help the user to recognize ...


2

Forgive the bad webcam photo of my bad sketches, but: Checked boxes for essentials (I see that kunl said this as well). For desirable, perhaps you could try to capture the look that someone gives when they see something desirable!


2

It is very hard and also very wrong to just make a guess in things like this without understanding the design pinciples or ethos behind the whole thing. But even so, here are my opinions. These are very general solutions, since they are made keeping in mind that no details have been provided. For the essential attributes, you can make a -checkbox ...


2

The issue is not one of copyright so much as legal requirement. International and national standard pictograms are not owned; they are mandated (or advised, depending on the jurisdiction and the application). In the US, for example, there are OSHA requirements for the workplace. The EU has its own signage regulations which are based on the ISO 7010 standard. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible