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16

I think you are on the right track already with your character. You just need more definition in order to relay the emotion or personality. See the brown marks I added. Simply adding facial definition & detail will help bring out the "evil" in the character. Note how the eyebrows protrude a bit more now. More wrinkles at the bridge of the nose makes ...


11

Consider reducing the size of the head. It is out of proportion to the body. If you look at most cute and cuddly cartoon characters, their features are exaggerated to make them look more cute. Most cute characters have overly large heads and eyes…mimicking a baby's appearance. In this case, your characters does not look cute, however the fact that your ...


7

To answer your questions by order I'd say : Keep older drawings Even crappy one can be a source of inspiration one day. Any medium would do the trick. Try many and choose 2 or 3 at the end. Stick with it if you enjoy using them. It can even be computered drawing too. It depends on what you're working on. For example, for webdesign, there are ...


6

Get a nature journal and spend a few weeks making a go at it. Small things are good so you can focus on the basics of observation and not get overwhelmed by the subject. You'll make lots of mistakes but don't criticize too early. Just draw. A lot. And draw everything you see. Any sketchbook that seems convenient will work. I like Moleskine's Cahier books ...


5

Paper, qualities and types, is a rabbit-hole that is very deep. Be warned. A high quality coated paper designed for ink-jet printers would take inks very well to reduce or eliminate the possibility of smearing while still keeping the lines crisp. Uncoated paper would absorb inks very well also, but would tend to bleed at the edges. Heavier paper in general ...


5

Do whatever removes the obstacles to working. Don't get hung up on the medium (paper vs. pixels) or the size or the permanence. I sketch in small notebooks, in Photoshop, on a wipe-off board, on the back of an envelope if I have nothing else to hand. It's convenient to have it all in one spiral-bound notebook, but don't let the lack of it prevent you from ...


4

First of all having a tablet for drawing is a step too far for you i guess, i you are used to using it, then its fine but a step backward and using mouse for starters will make you more comfortable on vector drawing. I personally find drawing vectors with mouse more controlled. Main method - not a mistake - with tablet is using it as a brush, think of it as ...


4

Definitely start with just a pencil and drawing pad. You don't want to spend money on an expensive tablet just to find out you don't like it and won't stick with it. That said, it depends on what your goals are, but drawing from life is the best way to understand whatever it is your trying to draw. If you just want to get better at drawing objects in ...


4

In the context of wireframing, I don't now that there's a simple way to do this in Inkscape, as Inkscape doesn't have the concept of 'brushes' that something like Adobe Illustrator has (making this rather easy to do). What I have done, however, is made my own 'sketchy' objects just for wireframing. The process was essentially drawing a few UI Primitives ...


4

Your drawings are very good! In a digital world, illustrations that possess some humanity (like yours) are unfortunately rare. Digital drawing tablets are fantastic for many uses but they do still have a certain quality that is distinct from hand made art. I like using physical media. For line drawings and shapes that need to have some organic ...


3

Inkscape comes with a variety of effect filters we can apply to our drawings. Amongst the many there are some effects to simulate hand-drawings. We can apply these filter with the menu Filters > Textures > Name of effect to all selected objects. Below are some example effects:


3

Go to the master! :D The vitruvian man by da Vinci is well worth studying. And I mean; spend time looking at it: There is of course the classic artists mannequin, that you can buy in all sorts of places; sometimes even toy shops: Any search for human proportions or artists model would give you massive amounts of a technical approach: I would like to ...


3

There are good sketching apps for tablets, like Sketchbook and Ideas. Even Wacom has Bamboo Paper for Android and iOS, but there's currently no off-the-shelf way to connect a Wacom tablet directly to a mobile device. Samsung demoed a Wacom pen-enabled Tab at Adobe MAX, and the Samsung Note is already on the market, with the Galaxy Note 10.1 scheduled for ...


3

Illustrator ships with several nice brushes. If you choose Open Brush Library > Artistic > Artistic_ChalkCharcoalPencil from the Brush Panel menu, several pencil-like brushes will load. From there, using a brush to draw whatever it is you want and applying one of the brushes should give you a pencil-like line. If you are working with existing shapes, you ...


3

Not entirely. When it comes to both of these tools (pen to less extent) as depressed they leave not only thinner, but also lighter trace. That can't be easily simulated in Ill. Other aspects however are more or less achievable. As for pencil/pen simulation, I'd go for calligraphic brush sensitive to pressure (I assume you've got access to pressure ...


3

With a lot of practice and a great deal of care, you can probably get that hand-sketched look in Illustrator using the pencil tool and brushes, but that's an arduous way to go about it. It's not what Illustrator was made for, so you're fighting the tool rather than making it work for you. What's fast is to draw by hand on paper, scan, and import into ...


3

It sounds like the best fit for what you are looking for is the Intuos4 Inking Pen. It is an accessory for Wacom's Intuos4 pressure sensitive tablet. The Intuos4 Large has a writing area about the size of a sheet of paper (which you would place on top when using ink), and with 2048 levels of pressure sensitivity and a resolution of 5080 lines per inch ...


2

Sounds like you're looking for the Wacom Inkling, Wacom Cintiq, or related product. I don't have any experience with these directly, but I believe they will work.


2

I have a graphic and product design studio, for me what i can say is that the best you can do is practicing every single day. Time you spend doing things is when you gain your skills, buy a bunch of pencils and a paper block, and follow this guy here: http://www.youtube.com/user/sketchadaydotcom/videos there are some great videos about how to draw basic ...


2

You don't mention what tablet you want to do this on, but as far as IOS and Android go, I'm pretty sure there is nothing available that will handle all your requirements set out above. However, if you wait until June, Adobe will launch a pen and ruler that will work with most apps and should deliver what you need. You can see theme here... ...


2

If you're happy with the pens you use and simply want to avoid sweaty-hand related smudging, you might have a use for those 'smudge guard' gloves they make for use with graphics tablets. They're designed to stop hand smudges without getting in the way of using a pen, and I don't see any reason why they wouldn't work as well for real pens as for digital ...


2

The links you provide are are illustrating exaggeration, not gesture drawing per se. Gesture drawing "proper" is an attempt to get at the essence of a pose without falling to nitpicking details. It is a good exercise only insomuch as it trains you to develop a context and a framework for the further detail you will inevitably bring later on. The problem ...


1

First; your drawings are very, very good. I would be delighted to see more of them. Never stop with pen and paper. Disclaimer. What follows are for the most part my opinion and personal experience. And pardon me for going on a rant about context. Background, scientific illustrations There are still people employed and being educated as scientific ...


1

There is no "best" method. Ultimately everything ends up as shapes and paths. How you get there is of no consequence. You should use whatever methods you find useful. The reason there are 2 schools of thought basically comes down to software features and age of the artist. 5-8 years ago there was no Width Tool, no stroke profiles, no Blob Brush, etc. ...


1

I agree with @horatio - caricature-ish is not the place to start. I disagree with @zach in spending 2-20 minutes and taking in the whole picture. Where I come from, it is called Croquis. It is a technique where the aim is to "clock up the pencil hours". It is about learning to see more than anything. The point is to draw quickly, hardly looking at the ...


1

I find that simply sitting down and drawing someone quickly, gesture style, adding more detail across the entire picture as I go helps. Whether you spend 2 minutes or 20 minutes on it, you should have the entire picture. I think this style of drawing is mostly a "seeing" exercise, which will help you with drawing in general. To answer your question: In ...


1

Almost all my web designs start out in Photoshop (think of that as electronic paper), and the rest of them really do begin with pencil on a pad. My initial renderings block out headers and logos menus static content dynamic content database results forms This is done on at least one page of each major section, as well as I usually create a paper site ...


1

I haven't used any video tutorials for drawing, but there are a lot of good texts such as those by Andrew Loomis. And then there's always taking a figure drawing class at the local community college. However, one video tutorial series I've been considering purchasing is The Structure of Man HD by Riven Phoenix. He also has a lot of other video series (most ...


1

Sort of. Illustrator has a feature called "Live Trace". It works by analyzing the image for blocks of color hues that are similar, and then blending them into shape regions. There are settings that you can play around with to get a smoother/more accurate vector trace, but from my own personal experience, it can be flaky. Try it out though with what you have ...


1

If you really wanted to make a project of it, you could photograph each page and then tag the photos in Bridge or iPhoto. You'd have to number each page and label each sketchbook so you could find it later, but then you'd end up with a search term of, say, "website UI design" and get a result of "Book 6 page 12, Book 6 page 14, Book 3 page 87." It would be ...



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