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9

According to the U.S. copyright act: A “derivative work” is a work based upon one or more pre-existing works, such as a translation, musical arrangement, dramatization, fictionalization, motion picture version, sound recording, art reproduction, abridgment, condensation, or any other form in which a work may be recast, transformed, or adapted. A work ...


8

On many of the stock photo sites, you can generally obtain the watermarked version of the image for free. The idea is that you wouldn't use the watermarked version in production and that it's simply just for the mock-ups. For the final version of your design, that will head to production, you would then purchase the non-watermarked versions and then replace ...


7

If it were me, I'd find a photo of gravel that was similar to the background of that image. Then extract the turtles from the original image and place them on the other (larger) background image, recreating shadows as necessary. Extracting the turtles and using a separate background image will provide much better results than trying to extend that limited ...


7

If you'll be going to a digital print shop to make the posters (which would be usual for a small run for a local event), you'll be fine at 150 ppi, and for a background image you probably wouldn't be in trouble at 100 ppi, particularly since it likely won't contain a lot of high-frequency detail that would conflict with your text. An 11x17 poster is mostly ...


6

Using a stock image as the entire logo, or even part of a logo requires proper permissions. The permissions depend on the license that that image is licensed under. Which license is needed is wholly dependent on what you plan to do with the final product. There are websites that have one license applied to the entire website, and anyone uploading to that ...


6

The licenses of both iStock and Shutterstock require copyright notice and attribution where the images are displayed as themselves. As a personal recommendation, I do not take on dishonest people as clients. This isn't only a matter of distaste: you cannot expect that someone who is dishonest with others will be honest with you.


5

IANAL, but clear documentation of permissions and focused management of assets on your end are really the only ways to obviate possible use claims. If a stock imagery site isn't able to provide clear documentation about the permissions status of an image, then don't download it and find something else that does. Also, having an asset or content management ...


4

Those avatars look like they were created with the Flash avatar maker "Create my Picture". The app can also be found at this link. Neither of these links is likely to be the original site for the application.


4

Your proposal means that you buy the image and then either sell the image to your client, perhaps for nothing or as an included fee in the full project price; keep a copy of the image yourself and distribute a copy to your client (perhaps for a fee, or maybe not). Both of these are explicity forbidden by the licence, which states that you may not:— ...


4

By reselling images to clients, most agencies and design firms are probably falling into a grey area in terms of violation of these license agreements. This is a very interesting legal issue that must be causing conflicts on the order of thousands of times a day. We all buy stock and use it in work. That's what stock images are intended for. As an agency, ...


3

Finding: this should be the easiest part, there are so many free icons on the web. I found this free one on iconfinder in seconds: For converting: the glyph set you linked has the PSD file included, so matching it should be easy by copying and applying the layer style. So you should have everything you need, but for the future, if you need an icon to ...


3

You can buy stock images like the ones above in any stock page. Here are a couple: http://www.istockphoto.com/search/text/3d%20guy/source/basic#108c75ff http://www.123rf.com/search.php?word=3d+guy&imgtype=0&t_word=&t_lang=en Or you can hire someone to do customized ones for you. Or you could do them yourself using a 3d software: ...


3

You're in a bind in this kind of situation. You would probably be best to avoid stock photography completely. Realize that you're going to be working mostly for free. Even if you win a few, the payouts in these "contests" are painfully low. Averaged across all your entries that don't win plus the few that do (even top talent on these sites runs about 1 in ...


3

The original artist contacted me. The font is called Venus Rising. EDIT: Okay, I got some additional clarification. The logo I put in this question does indeed use N-Gage font. However, we asked him to modify the logo for us. When he did that he switched to using a modified version of Venus Rising. Here is our modified version of the logo in the question. ...


3

I think Yisela above has your solution. Hire a photographer, find some customers who are willing to model, and take photos of them IN the salon. The bonus for the salon is that the images will also promote his/her actual business, not just "generic salon." With a digital camera and a laptop, you can review photos on site, and make sure you and the owner have ...


3

To give yourself extra reassurance, you might try using Google's search by image function. Other search engines do this too. Drag and drop the image onto Google and the search results will show you sites that are displaying that image. If an image has a source other than the site you found it on, you will likely be able to find it this way. Here is a URL ...


3

Most images of that style are likely still under copyright and so unavailable unless you can discover a Bible-oriented stock image shop and pay for them. You might be able to find a few public domain images or freely-licensed images at Wikimedia Commons.


2

The safest bet is not to use the original file in the building of a derivative. If you were inspired by another person's art to create something, great! Now create a new and different version with that inspiration from scratch. Make your own sketch on a blank canvas with that spark of inspiration in mind. At the most, use a piece here or there from the ...


2

Disclaimer: I am not a lawyer. You need to consult a lawyer to get a definitive answer. You're now getting into a very hazy area of copyright law, and copyright law doesn't do much to help. There are a few ways of looking at this. The first says that using a portion of the original image would be considered "fair use". The second says to use the portion ...


2

Just to inform you; I 've used an image of gettyimages by using screenshot program. Just an cropped part of it. I modified and merged it with 50% transparency with my existing image. Then I changed some saturation. The image was 150x150 pixel. After 2 years, I received an legal warning letter with costs about $1500.-. Also if you "CAN" download the image ...


2

From a contract and legal point of view it would depend on the rights given per the copyright holder. From and ethical point of view, and perhaps from a legal point of view, “How can he not be misrepresenting his work and business?” One way to challenge this without perhaps losing the client is to try to get him to sign some sort of contract which includes ...


2

You can try RGGJAN fork of GIMP available at partha.com (bottom links in the left sidebar). It has an improved tool for selecting objects. You just select general area, mark the object with a brush, and you get your selection. Here is a video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=kkQ1r5g49d4


2

it looks like an edited version of Neuropol - http://www.dafont.com/neuropol.font or Orbitron -http://www.google.com/fonts/specimen/Orbitron


2

The free watermarked, lo-res version of the image that jmort523 is referring to is also called a "comp image". E.g. on iStockPhoto, you can Download a comp as the link says under each photo. The "comp" here refers to a comprehensive or comprehensive layout (see here). This is the initial layout mockup that you present to clients to give a rough idea of how ...


2

There are a few ways to transform without having warping occur: For dimensions: Go to Image Size and make sure the "Constrain Proportions" box is checked before you change the height or width. I'm not sure what you're editing but also Ctrl+T (Edit > Transform) and then holding the shift key down while you move a corner anchor. For total size: Save ...


1

Shutterstock's fantasy category has some nice images you might be able to use (or if you find a style you like you can contact the artist directly). I'd also consider navigating through a site like DeviantArt, where young artists showcase they work. Commissions are usually not that pricey. You could also search for stock videos / footage, it's quite ...


1

That depends on the license of these photos. If you merely "have access" and no publishing rights, expect a call from lawyers and shelling out a rather hefty sum to settle it out of court... If you can purchase right to use given images, check the license you're purchasing. If it lets you modify the image, okay. Often the author doesn't agree to that - ...


1

It's possible, yes. Most would use Adobe Photoshop for this, but you could use Gimp or any number of software packages. With stock images you need to carefully read any license agreements. It may very well be against a license to use an image as a book cover since the image would be a primary driving force of sales. Many stock images also have usage limits ...


1

Normally I'd use the rectangle marquee to copy the background (say from just before the turtle to the left edge), paste to a new layer in Photoshop, and then flip that layer horizontally. I'd make the new layer semi-transparent for a minute while I lined it up the edges. The right edge of the new layer should match and overlap the left edge of the original ...


1

Simple answer is you don't. You can not change the width and height of an image by transformation without warping the image unless you transform proportionally. If you need images which are not proportional to the original, the best solution is to crop the images. If you wish to change the size of an image in a non-proportional manner without warping it, ...



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