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23

http://browse.deviantart.com/photography/ http://www.sxc.hu/ http://www.freeimages.co.uk/ http://www.freedigitalphotos.net http://www.freefoto.com/ http://www.morguefile.com/ http://www.stockvault.net/ And over thousands of free stock images


11

Most of the time images with proper documentation can avoid legal issues there are so many sites having such images, they will provide you the whole uses document on request : Corbis Images Istock Photos Shutter stock Big stock photos getty Images Find free stock Images 16 websites with Free Stock Images for commercial use Hope this will help.


9

According to the U.S. copyright act: A “derivative work” is a work based upon one or more pre-existing works, such as a translation, musical arrangement, dramatization, fictionalization, motion picture version, sound recording, art reproduction, abridgment, condensation, or any other form in which a work may be recast, transformed, or adapted. A work ...


9

Traditionally stock sites allow you download a free, watermarked "comp" image which can be used in your design until the client approves the piece. Once the client has approved, you can then go back and purchase and download the non-watermarked image. You are free to purchase and download the non-watermarked image whenever you'd like however. It's not ...


8

On many of the stock photo sites, you can generally obtain the watermarked version of the image for free. The idea is that you wouldn't use the watermarked version in production and that it's simply just for the mock-ups. For the final version of your design, that will head to production, you would then purchase the non-watermarked versions and then replace ...


7

If you'll be going to a digital print shop to make the posters (which would be usual for a small run for a local event), you'll be fine at 150 ppi, and for a background image you probably wouldn't be in trouble at 100 ppi, particularly since it likely won't contain a lot of high-frequency detail that would conflict with your text. An 11x17 poster is mostly ...


7

If it were me, I'd find a photo of gravel that was similar to the background of that image. Then extract the turtles from the original image and place them on the other (larger) background image, recreating shadows as necessary. Extracting the turtles and using a separate background image will provide much better results than trying to extend that limited ...


6

The licenses of both iStock and Shutterstock require copyright notice and attribution where the images are displayed as themselves. As a personal recommendation, I do not take on dishonest people as clients. This isn't only a matter of distaste: you cannot expect that someone who is dishonest with others will be honest with you.


6

http://www.iconfinder.com/ Robust icon search engine, with licensing filters.


6

Using a stock image as the entire logo, or even part of a logo requires proper permissions. The permissions depend on the license that that image is licensed under. Which license is needed is wholly dependent on what you plan to do with the final product. There are websites that have one license applied to the entire website, and anyone uploading to that ...


6

Veer hasn't been posted yet. Veer makes it easier to be creative with a reliable and affordable selection of creative stock photography, stock illustrations, and fonts. Our creative elements help people add style to business, marketing, and personal design projects—from websites and blog posts to business presentations and ad campaigns.


6

If you think it came from Getty, send them a message and see if they can dig it up for you. They'll be happy to do a little image research if they know you're going to pay.


6

Cool product called TinEye will do this reverse image lookup for you. Results vary depending on the source image, of course, but it could save you a bit of time.


5

You're in a bind in this kind of situation. You would probably be best to avoid stock photography completely. Realize that you're going to be working mostly for free. Even if you win a few, the payouts in these "contests" are painfully low. Averaged across all your entries that don't win plus the few that do (even top talent on these sites runs about 1 in ...


5

Another avenue would be to contact one of the companies whose products the salon uses. sometimes they have a whole section of marketing materials and the only thing they ask is that you let their logo intact if you use their images.


5

IANAL, but clear documentation of permissions and focused management of assets on your end are really the only ways to obviate possible use claims. If a stock imagery site isn't able to provide clear documentation about the permissions status of an image, then don't download it and find something else that does. Also, having an asset or content management ...


5

A Google search for "stock photos" will turn up dozens of sites you can purchase images from.


5

If you don't mind giving a credit to the picture author, you can search flickr images that use Creative Commons license, and use pictures that do not restrict commercial use.


5

Some icon links: http://art.gnome.org/themes/icon/1100 http://www.pinvoke.com/ http://sweetie.sublink.ca/ http://www.famfamfam.com/lab/icons/silk/ http://tango.freedesktop.org/Tango_Icon_Library


4

Those avatars look like they were created with the Flash avatar maker "Create my Picture". The app can also be found at this link. Neither of these links is likely to be the original site for the application.


4

Your proposal means that you buy the image and then either sell the image to your client, perhaps for nothing or as an included fee in the full project price; keep a copy of the image yourself and distribute a copy to your client (perhaps for a fee, or maybe not). Both of these are explicity forbidden by the licence, which states that you may not:— ...


4

By reselling images to clients, most agencies and design firms are probably falling into a grey area in terms of violation of these license agreements. This is a very interesting legal issue that must be causing conflicts on the order of thousands of times a day. We all buy stock and use it in work. That's what stock images are intended for. As an agency, ...


4

Is it acceptable to use stock materials in design? Yes it is perfectly acceptable. Make sure you follow the licensing agreement but otherwise have at it. Think of it this way, Helvetica, one of the most used fonts in the world wasn't designed by any of the current designers that use it. Max Miedinger, the designer, passed away in 1980. Most fonts in ...


3

You can buy stock images like the ones above in any stock page. Here are a couple: http://www.istockphoto.com/search/text/3d%20guy/source/basic#108c75ff http://www.123rf.com/search.php?word=3d+guy&imgtype=0&t_word=&t_lang=en Or you can hire someone to do customized ones for you. Or you could do them yourself using a 3d software: ...


3

Google reverse image lookup says www.iconator.com for the second one, but I'm not sure how long I want to spend trawling around their site...


3

Hope this will help your need http://www.hongkiat.com/blog/28-high-resolution-wood-textures-for-designers/


3

While not exactly a stock site... Flickr & Creative Commons Many Flickr users have chosen to offer their work under a Creative Commons license, and you can browse or search through content under each type of license. Attribution License Attribution-NoDerivs License Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License Attribution-NonCommercial ...


3

I think Yisela above has your solution. Hire a photographer, find some customers who are willing to model, and take photos of them IN the salon. The bonus for the salon is that the images will also promote his/her actual business, not just "generic salon." With a digital camera and a laptop, you can review photos on site, and make sure you and the owner have ...


3

To give yourself extra reassurance, you might try using Google's search by image function. Other search engines do this too. Drag and drop the image onto Google and the search results will show you sites that are displaying that image. If an image has a source other than the site you found it on, you will likely be able to find it this way. Here is a URL ...


3

The rules are outlined in the EULA that you would be agreeing to by purchasing the rights to reproduce the image. Typically using it for a logo is not permitted.



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