Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

Some people call it an arrow or a caret that enables a slide-out of content or a popup can display some sort of information. In this particular instance it would appear it is for the navigation. Since you tagged this with CSS I included an example of how to create it: .arrow_box { position: relative; background: #b34ae5; } .arrow_box:after { ...


0

I can't find a uniformly used term, but the closest term I can find is "fluid art", or seemingly interchangeable term "liquid art". The same term seems to be used across photos, paintings, 3D renderings, and videos.


3

Make a greyscale image, save as either a JPG or TIFF (doesn't work with EPSs) and import into InDesign. Colour the box as usual, and use the direct selection arrow to colour the image.


2

These are called 'starburst' backgrounds, and we have a nice answer about them here.


1

That's the sort of thing you can do with PS Gradient Map adjustment layers (#ff6438 and #2d3560 on the left, #513750 and #92dfd3 on the right).


6

On paper, they'd be high-contrast duotones. Or, possibly monotones printed on colored paper with opaque inks (such as via screen printing). Possible other ways to describe the effect would include: photocopy (tends to be high contrast, one color) halftone (not really a style shown here on screen at this size, but part of the aesthetic ala newspapers) ...


5

It's a cast shadow. Cast shadows are designed to show a lower level of a pseudo light angle, thus creating longer shadows. Drop shadows are designed to show a high level of pseudo light resulting in a small offset shadow.


1

Long Shadow. Learn how to make them here: http://www.awwwards.com/flat-long-shadows-step-by-step-tutorial-resources-and-examples.html


1

I don't consider this to be a new kind of shadow. I think it is still called a "drop shadow". Also i agree with the comments. Imo this is not a shadow in your picture, it's a motion blur, eventhough it should be white.



Top 50 recent answers are included