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17

Characters that could be interchanged, indeed, would save money in the days of moveable type. That said, the '1' and 'l' were given spots in the typical job case: When typewriters came along, the mechanics dictates that the fewer characters meant the fewer bars needed, which was a huge benefit giving the limited space. As such, early typewriters omitted ...


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It's important to know that Minimalism is a thought process instead of an end look. If you design with the goal is make it more "minimalist," chances are you're doing it wrong. The thought process involves creating elements that are absolutely necessary without adding anymore value-less clutter. One of my favorite quotes: “Perfection is achieved, not ...


12

I think it would be good to browse through some popular icon sets to become familiar with the visual vocabulary that icon set designers use. Look at the Silk icon set I'm sure you'll recognize many in there. But, essentially I would say that the reason your icons don't look up-to-date is because they really lack refinement and craft, something commonly ...


9

It depends on the media that you are using, the audience and the amount of information that you have to display, and the relevance that you want to give. More a page is cluttered, and less is easy to distinguish in a text a particular word or phrase or in a graphic a specific elements. I normally make the example of newspapers and adverts in fashion ...


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The amount of whitespace is always directly related to neighbouring elements. If the content is very busy (lots of visual information) you should use more whitespace around your logo/image/text. That will isolate it from the surrounding visual information thus making it visible. Check the everyday leaflets you probably get in your mailbox. They're usually ...


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You're delving into a matter of taste here. There are many ways to be minimal. You have done it successfully, in my opinion. I suspect it is the extreme reduction in styling that is bothering your friends. All critiques are not equal The first question you should ask is, are your friends representative of your target audience? If not, find some people who ...


8

The 90s had quite a few styles over the span of that decade that I think would be identifiable as big graphic design trends. It started with a holdover from the late 80s that I'd perhaps call 'neon': The mid-90s were dominated both visually and musically by the grunge/seattle-sound. Two of the big names from that era would have been Art Chantry (and a lot ...


7

Your current icon is bordering upon iMovie infringement. :) If Apple approved it, then I guess they feel it's okay. But knowing Apple, things could change. A Few psychological notations: Curved paths always feel less serious and more friendly. Using straight paths for the star would give it more of a serious impression. High contrast also lends to a more ...


7

A few thoughts... The icons look flat — there's no effort at a 3D effect, shadows, gradients, texture, etc. The colors are very bright and primary. All lowercase for auto. I think if it were all caps or small caps that would somehow seem fresher. I'm amused by the lime-green HAL for "alerts" rather than something with an exclamation point... If you ...


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I think this applies more for designer-illustrators. As the other poster wrote, usually it's more about communicating the personality of the client's brand than your own style. That said, many designers choose to focus on specific industries, which makes sense since each industry has its own aesthetics and fashions. However, if you're a ...


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If you want to develop your own style, you should have a thorough understanding of the basics first. Know what works and why. Play around with different mediums and different styles. Learn the conventions of your favorite style and master them. Then start breaking rules, though always with a purpose. As you gain mastery over your favorite style, your work ...


7

Interesting. Not entirely sure what part of the style you are after, but I am going to take your noir as a hint. Actually, I think you are pretty close in your search, but I think you need to use "film noir poster". That will give you a lot of stuff like this: Another search term is "pulp paperback cover" or "pulp fiction". This is the classic name for ...


6

While this is not always true, graphic design often involves expressing the style and message of a website or cause rather than your own ideas. Where painters may use their work most often to express their own ideas, graphic design often involves expressing particular work. In other words, the style of graphics is usually determined primarily by the purpose ...


6

@Jack this actually is a bevel To use: drop shadow, about 1 or 2px (opacity low) gradient (light green to slighter darker green) Bevel (opacity low, size 1 px) Note: If you invert it (dark inner shadow, and reverse the gradient and bevel and you will have your pressed/mouse-over button. Will provide screenshot and download later EDIT This is what i ...


6

It's easy to over-think design. The hilariously overwrought and over-intellectualized b***sh*t that was revealed when the new Pepsi logo went public (great article and the actual document here) gave rise to much rofling, deservedly so. It's a fine example of the "baloney baffles brains" approach to design. It produced a monstrosity, and I was not in the ...


6

All caps are certainly OK. The key is to use them sparingly rather as the norm. Use them for contrast. As text headings? That could work. For setting pages of a novel? Avoid that.


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Things to consider: Larger inner margin not outer. A larger inner margin helps prevent text from being crammed into the gutter of the spine. If you don't leave ample margin for the inner side you may find it gets difficult to read text near the gutter with every additional page. Creep. Creep happens when books are bound. Each signature needs to be slightly ...


6

These are offshoots of Delaunay Triangulation and can most easily be found by searching for "Delaunay Illustration", "Triangulated Illustrations" or "Triangulation Illustrations" There are other tools that have since become available such as, DMesh.


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After years of working with clients and bosses I have learned to always ask, "Why?". For instance in your situation I would be asking, "What's the problem you are trying to solve with using a photograph?". This does two things: It reframes the question from design specifics to a language you both speak well It reframes allows your boss to elaborate on his ...


5

I believe the style is called "Ink" or "Ink Brush." It's become quite popular in recent years. I remember seeing it in Street Fighter 4 a while back and it was nicely done. To achieve it, you can use any of the water color photoshop brushes. Here are some links: http://www.bittbox.com/freebies/free-hi-res-watercolor-photoshop-brushes ...


5

All caps is a common and always acceptable setting for headlines, titles, main heads and even subheads in some cases. Form field labels are titles, and uppercase works fine. In your example, the uppercase enhances the clean look of the form, helps to quiet the page and creates crisp little rectangles that help guide the eye. Using title case would be okay, ...


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We don't do brainstorming here but we can help refining what the problem is and looking at the way to approach coming up with ideas for something like this. We're talking about visual metaphors that evoke the right kind of associations and that set the right mood, tone and associations. 'Cyber' in the late 90's and early 2000's generally evoked the ...


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Cubism Cubism is an early-20th-century avant-garde art movement pioneered by Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso, joined by Jean Metzinger, Albert Gleizes, Robert Delaunay, Henri Le Fauconnier, Fernand Léger and Juan Gris1 that revolutionized European painting and sculpture, and inspired related movements in music, literature and architecture. Cubism has ...


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The style is "cubist" or "cubism" but I think the images you post have a definite digital feel. I would call them "cubist illustration" or "digital cubism" if I were trying to specify and illustration style.


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While we could trace the aesthetic back to various art and design styles such as the aforementioned cubism, there are some more recent terms such as low-poly or faceted illustration. Tim Reynolds was one of the earlier users of the style. It can be done via 3D rendering (where it originates...essentially reducing the polygons used to render a complex ...


5

No I don't think it fits into any of the styles you listed. Road textures and paint splatters are usually associated with grunge and/or graffiti as far as I know. Which makes sense since Berkvisual is a graffiti artist.


4

A lot of 'art deco' and 'arts and crafts' era typefaces will have atypically low (or high) cross bars. Use those search terms on a site like MyFonts to find a variety of options.



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