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5

If you go to the Accessibility control panel, you can enable a zoom mode that blows up whatever is being displayed. Using this, you can detect subpixel antialiasing because it shows up as color fringes when magnified. I tried this out and found that, yes, the Retina MacBook Pro does still use sub-pixel antialiasing (when LCD font smoothing is on). Somewhat ...


5

A Retina display is a screen with a high pixel density. Apple's marketing material defines it like so: The pixel density is so high, your eyes can’t discern individual pixels. But at a technical level, the Retina displays on the iPhone, iPod, iPad and MacBook Pro are exactly double the pixel density of the non-Retina models. This is because scaling to ...


4

Unfortunately, no, there isn't a way to, using the tools that Photoshop has by default, replicate the different browsers' rendering (note that all browsers render text in a distinct way). That's one of the reasons lots of designers create mockups straight in html/css, because of these discrepancies. There are, however, Photoshop actions and plugins you can ...


4

Subpixel font smoothing is (typically) part of the operating system's type rendering engine. As such, it really has nothing to do with images. The common bitmap image formats for the web (JPG, GIF and PNG) don't allow the embedding of font information, so the best you can do is render the type as part of the bitmap image. You could use subpixel rendering ...


4

This is an artifact, obviously, of wretchedly failed attempts to render vector information accurately on screen. The problem may be specific to Stone Sans. Have you tried experimenting with something else? Something in the hinting information (although I don't know why you'd want to hint the bottoms of sans strokes) would be the hot suspect. If the problem ...


3

I don't know of an automated tool that will do what you're looking for, but if you don't mind setting up some test pages you can preview them using Browsershots.org or Adobe's Browser Lab. Both services are free (though Adobe's requires an Adobe ID) and will show you screenshots of your site in different browsers and operating systems. Browsershots has a ...


3

import the vector paths and raster images into illustrator and redo layout. Illustrator CS5 has in the transform pallet a check box for constrain to pixel grid. Select all of your vector paths and check this box. Then when you resize it will stay aligned to the pixel grid. It may be some work but if your raster images are placed from photoshop and your ...


2

At this order of resolution (meant as in ppi) one can drop subpixel rendering altogether without making much of a difference (difference will be almost unnoticable if at all visible). I think even hinting could be dropped and almost no harm will be done. So much pixels on an inch of length implies rather “printwise” mindset instead of traditional ...


2

I believe what you're looking for is subpixel rendering. It's a way of tricking the eye and the display into rendering images sharply at smaller sizes. In your case, I would have 2 files, one for < 24px and one for > 24px. A lot of the details you put into a smaller icon don't translate to smaller sizes. subpixel rendering: ...


2

If the issue is the same as the Stackoverflow question you reference then isn't the answer the same too? That's a Hinting problem. When you generate your font-face kit (like in FontSquirrel), you need to specify Hinting on the Expert options. Choose Expert, and under Rendering, select: Apply Hinting - Improve Win rendering.


2

As Alan Gilbertson say in his answer, this is probably problems related to display the vector information well on screen. If you try to print on paper, it will look perfect. If the PDF you create is mainly for printing, this is not a problem, but if it is mainly for sharing electronically, you might consider using a different font that looks better. I ...


2

Simulating subpixel anti-aliasing in an image is very useful in case you are creating a mock-up for, say, a website. None of the regular type anti-aliasing options in Photoshop even remotely look like what a browser does with the very same font. Making mockups with subpixel AA prevents surprises and customers going 'but the text doesn't look nearly as good ...


1

CS6 does not appear to offer distributed rendering as such. Premiere CS6 via the Media Encoder (which all Adobe video apps can use), can render your work in the background though, which may help: http://tv.adobe.com/watch/cs6-creative-cloud-feature-tour-for-video/save-time-with-powerful-background-rendering-using-media-encoder/ Hopefully this helps, David


1

Please post the image you are working with as a PNG, and also a screenshot of the problem you are seeing in your browser. As far as I understand your description, I have never experienced this problem, and I'm convinced that, unless you are omitting a critical step in your process, what you're describing should not happen. Photoshop simply selects what is ...


1

I'll take a stab at this. I may be going over ground you've already covered, so forgive me if I'm being redundant. Perhaps edge transparency combined with anti-aliasing at the rounded corners is biting you, because it sounds like you're copying these slices and then finding they don't line up. The end result of copying an object with transparency is that ...


1

Paul, if your text is on the same layer as other graphics, Indesign is converting your text to outline so it can trap your text and graphics together. Create a new layer in Indesign and make sure that it sits on top, then select and move your text to the that top layer and export to PDF. Your text should look clean in the PDF. Cheers! Hope this helped.



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