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You you need to change the output save pattern from 's/svg$/filename.svg/' to 's/svg$/png/', and you enter the width and height that you want as the pixel values. for i in *; do rsvg-convert $i -w 64-h 64 -f png -o echo $i | sed -e 's/svg$/png/'; done


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Leaving a "last resort" method here. Not ideal since it involves mucking about with code and seems to require access to a code editor. The ideal method would involve standard design software where it's harder to accidentally break things. But if anyone is in a similar position and can muck about with code and regex, here's an example set of steps based on ...


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It is is currently not possible to modify SVG styles in the browser, however this is set to change soon, once the SVG2 specification is finalized and adopted by vendors. However W3 use a polyfill script on the aforementioned article to emulate the effect


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Just found your question. Here is a solution based on a Forum post by user 'loonquawl': You open the XML Editor (under Edit) and look for the color used (select the object on the canvas, and it gets highlighted in the XML Editor), copy the color (it is one of the values in "Style" e.g. fill:#ffff00 and insert it into the Style Box in the Search Dialog ...


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Make sure that every path gets a thin stroke in the same color as the fill. I wouldn't know how to do this automatically in Inkscape or AI, but depending on your how geek you are, you can do search and replace in a text editor on the SVG file. SVG files are human readable ASCII files (well, kinda readable). You'd need to use a text-editor that can do ...


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I have no experience with EMFs in particular, but the general problem when converting between different vector formats is that certain objects (such as text, Bézier polygons with borders or gradients) are not available in the target format. Ideally, Inkscape converts its objects to objects which are supported by the target format. If you experience losses ...


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The best way around this is to expand your fonts/any other assets in your SVG that aren't rendering properly when you open it in the browser. What this means is, you need to highlight your text areas and turn them into Illustrator paths instead of leaving them as selectable text. The easiest way to do this is: Select all of your text Go to Object >> ...


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I would save a backup with fonts active, and then save another version with fonts converted to outline, saved as .svg format for usage on the web.


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Since SVG files are the one I needed the most, OpenClipart had some good images that look good for my purposes. As member Rachuru suggested, iconfinder did the job for icons. I have upvoted both answers, but will accept Rachuru's because iconfinder helped me to find icons I needed. I have posted this answer just in case someone else needs free SVG images. ...


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I copy and paste only the paths I want in the SVG to a newly created art board and save to SVG from there. Additionally, to ensure it's optimised for file size as much as possible, I use the Pathfinder and Divide then Merge the paths. Before using Pathfinder, all paths should be fully expanded.



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