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0

The workarround I found for you is that you download Inkscape https://inkscape.org. Then save it as eps. Now you can import this eps.


3

Select > Select All Click the Merge button on the Pathfinder Panel Click the white shapes and delete them Click the bottom shape and change the color Note I'm using the Direct Selection Tool (the white arrow) for a reason here. You should do the same.


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Ok if I got you right, you just need to draw the rectangle (it seems you have it already) to divide your circle into (shoulder and bottom part which you'll remove later), select to objects circle and rectangle go pathfinders / devide remove the rect and the bottom part select it and change the color. save as / svg


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You need to test the compatibility on diferent target devices, mainly mobil ones to see if your background works. According to this: http://caniuse.com/#feat=svg-css It is now safe to use it inline. If the image is a flat design I would use a png. I would not use a svg for background, just for diagrams. I do not think a background needs to be "that" ...


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Try to check "Preserve Illustrator editing capabilities" while saving, it should fix the problem. Moreover, be sure that: "responsive" is not checked your artwork isn't bigger than your canvas your canvas' size doesn't contains decimal values I use Illustrator to generate .svg for the web and it works pretty well.


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That happens because the tree images aren't in the same folder that the SVG resides, there are two ways that you can solve it: Copying the necesary files to the same folder that the SVG resides. Embed the image in the SVG file (see this).


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I'm not sure how you built the .ai file, but I usually download an icon or create outlines on a piece of art and text. What you do is select the artwork and copy it, then open a new document, set the artboard to what you want it to be, then paste in place. The svg will have a viewport and a viewbox with 0 for the x, y coordinates.


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So I have the same problem with clipping of icons in exporting svg. Here is kind of a hack way I played around with that makes the clipping problem go away: Create a mask layer (of the share you desire) under your icon layer. See screenshot below:


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Its just linear interpolation of point positions. Here is a quick illustrator script example: #target illustrator var sel = app.activeDocument.selection; if (sel.length === 2){ if(sel[0].typename == "PathItem" && sel[1].typename == "PathItem") { for (var incr=-0.4; incr < 1.5; incr += 0.2){ if (incr != 0 ...


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You can make the SVG file at any size you want using CSS. If you added a class to the SVG HTML <img class="icon" src="my-svg-file.svg"> CSS .icon { width: 50px; } The icon will now be 50px wide. This is a pretty in depth tutorial CSS Tricks - Using SVG. An important thing to remember Notice the artboard is cropped up right agains the ...


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The reason why the font does not render correctly to the actual font type is because, when the SVG is saved using the Illustrator application. The application automatically converts the design to code. And if observed closely the font name within the code does not match to the actual font installed within the system. To overcome the issue of font rendering ...


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After you're done creating an SVG in Inkscape, you can just select the clipart and copy it using Ctrl+C and then paste it in GIMP using Ctrl+V. It is as simple as that. However, Ctrl+C from Inkscape and Ctrl+V in GIMP may not work sometimes. In that case, you might want to copy it from Inkscape just like before and then go to GIMP, Go to Edit > Paste As ...


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Here are a few simple things you can do while in Illustrator to keep file size low: Merging as many shapes together as possible. Expanding paths if you must use a path instead of a shape. Reducing decimals places to 1. This is found in the advanced options in Illustrator when saving the image as an SVG. Don't preserve AI editing capabilities either. Avoid ...



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