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14

Generically, it's called a "fleuron". Some specifically call it an "aldus leaf". A fleuron is essentially an ornamental typographic character. The Aldus Leaf being a commonly used one. More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleuron_(typography)


9

Method one - works with any shape. Create a no-fill, no-stroke rectangle and place a $ sign in the middle of it. $ sign must be on top of the rectangle. The amount of space between the $ sign and the rectangle edges will determine the spacing between the repeated $ signs. Drag all that to the Brush panel and choose Pattern Brush when asked. Then click OK ...


8

How one can represent several grayish materials in 6 by 6 px using realistic colors? Well... you can't, at least if they're supposted to look different. Personally I'd stick to using just the three colors bronze, silver, gold which have a fairly well recognized order, known from sports-medals. As soon as you add more metals or elements you start to assume ...


7

This is probably most likely considered a "rosette" and the style of the time period would be probably be called "Romanesque." As far as this particular design, I don't know if it is a class of design, but it was built up using some very basic geometrical manipulation. The cross is an obvious choice from a cultural perspective as well as a geometrical ...


6

The issue with silver, platinum and diamond is that they are all usually represented with similar colors. Color alone would not be enough, but shape can go a long(er) way. You mention you want your icons to be really small, if that's the case, only way to go is very simple shapes, like Stein mentions. I don't think it would be a good idea to have two ...


6

Yes! It's called GREP styles, and you'll find it under paragraph styles. It allows you to enter a "regular expression" ( code-based super powerful advanced search), then, it applies a character style of your choice to anything that matches those criteria, instantly and automatically. If you edit text so a snippet no longer ...


4

Another approach to this particular situation is to use a relatively obscure (in my opinion, anyway) feature of the Transform Effect. It's under Effect > Distort and Transform > Transform and not under Object > Transform. The Transform effect doesn't create copies of your object, so it's light on memory. It is also a live effect, so if you change ...


4

Window > Symbols (Shift+Ctrl+F11) It's probably already open in a tab by your Swatches and Brushes Then you can just select your objects as a group and drag them right onto that window and it will prompt you to make them into a Symbol as a Graphic or Movie Clip.


4

Make sure you've looked at the ticks and crosses available in Arial Unicode MS, Wingdings and Wingdings 2. Can be difficult to find in Character Map though, as they don't appear at consistent points in the Unicode table. These are not free fonts of course, but given you're producing an image sprite rather than embedding, this is not an issue.


4

The question asks about prime and double-prime symbols for minutes and seconds, which have been used for ages, and even feature in a piece of piano music (or what would be piano music, if there were a note played). However it then veers off from the question title to ask about extending this to using degree ° for hours. Don't. Prime/Double prime ...


3

Allrighty - I´ll jump in. You could simply use smiley-faces, or you could use a coloured bar of some sort. Another alternative is to simply colour the text, so that the least relevant is a paler colour. Target with or without dart. These examples are very crude, but I hope you get the general idea. Of course, you could combine them. (Should I come up with ...


3

No. It depends entirely on the font. Some fonts have the superscripting built in, others provide you with relatively full height glyphs. Among those that are predesigned, there are varying levels of optimization for varying point sizes. That last point is critical. The principal considerations are: Make sure the glyphs are legible (some go with the ...


3

Edit: Anything depending on unicode characters depends on a) what characters exist in the fonts available to the client and b) what characters and unicode features are supported by the browser. Both are generally pretty bad. This is an example of something that works in Webkit browsers (Chrome, Safari... but not Firefox which mangles these characters) on a ...


3

No. You can't have multiple, differing, iterations of the same symbol. You can use the Symbol tools, like the Symbol Stainer, but that won't allow specific color assignments within any symbol. If you need different colored symbols, you need different symbols. You can easily swap symbols. Simply select a symbol on the artboard and then use the Control bar ...


3

I'm not sure of a general library, but this is the symbol for centre of gravity in engineering. You also see it used on crash test dummies and vehicles, where apparently it's a danger symbol.


2

It sounds like you're referring to accent marks, also called diacritics. The link has a very thorough list. Each font has certain accented characters built into it. You can see them through a font management program (I don't know what system you're using). It will present you with a sheet of every character available in the font. If the one you want isn't ...


2

I think the term you may be looking for is diacritic: a glyph added to a letter, or basic glyph. ... Some diacritical marks, such as the acute ( ´ ) and grave ( ` ) are often called accents. Diacritical marks may appear above or below a letter, or in some other position such as within the letter or between two letters. As the Wikipedia quote ...


2

After Google and symbols.com, it looks like graphicdesign.stackexchange.com is probably your next best bet. The term for the symbol you posted depends on the field it's being used in: In print, it's usually known as a registration mark. In architecture it's described as a position mark. In recorded crash testing, it's referred to as a calibration mark. ...


2

[...] what is an effective research process for looking into the existing meanings of a symbol you might be using in a drawing or icon? If you don't recognize the symbol and you can't easily locate it using methods like Googling for "symbol" or "symbols" or using other reference material you have available, then perhaps the symbol has no traditional, ...


2

I/O means input-output, right? Something that is traditionally conceptualised using flow diagrams? So why not, a box subtly styled to vaguely resemble your company's products (e.g vent-like lines on the edges? plastic/brushed aluminium texture?), a jagged electricity-like or curly cable-like arrow from the left going in, and the same arrow on the right ...


2

Not by applying styles to the symbols themselves. THe entire purpose of symbols is that they are identical elements. You can duplicate a symbol, edit the specific internal elements and apply styles to those. Then use that new symbol. You would need a separate symbol for each different internal appearance.


2

↺ ↔ ⇋ 🔃 🔁 This question is really merely a matter of looking through the tables until you find a symbol which is acceptable. Then ensuring you have a font available which supports that character. On my system, unfortunately half of the above are not supported (at least not in my currently active ...


2

↻ ↱↲ ↷ over reversed ↷ (you can get that in HTML & CSS3, alternative characters would be ⃕) ⃝ with ^ and reversed ^ put onto the circle to simulate arrows (again: requires CSS3 to mix&match these) ѻ and hope noone will look too close ;) Sorry, but there isn't a character that matches exactly your requirements.


2

This might work: Turn each object independently into a symbol. Select them all (the bounding box Re-size them all together so they are closer to the center point (as you indicated, each object will get re-sized) With all the symbols still selected, right click and select "Reset Transformation". The symbols will recover their original size but stay in the ...


2

I would try the noun project for these icons. You can either take inspiration from what you find there or use what you find there as long as you purchase it or give the artist attribution. These are broad concepts that call up different imagery for different people depending on their cultural background. Who is your audience? Is this also for the daycare ...


2

A few things to note: gold, silver, bronze are known ranks for most people. platinum and diamonds are known to be valuable, but I don't think most people would know where to rank them in regards to the initial 3 color, alone, is not enough to make an icon fully accessible visually--lots of people are colorblind or may be using a crappy screen, or their ...


2

I did some research on this, and in no way did I find that there is a symbol for accountancy. I do not think this line of enquiry is productive. As I see it: your job is to make a good logo. Good logos are not always the ones that figuratively picture a subject. I think you are better off dropping looking for "commonly understood symbol", and rather ...


1

If you wish to move a group of all objects to a center pint, without resizing them, you'll have to do it manually or in specific groups (left, top objects - right, bottom objects, etc). There is no method to concentrate objects around a given point without resizing. Scripting may be able to do this. But I'm not certain.


1

Assuming that by slices you mean the 9-slice scaling feature of a symbol, it does apply to common library symbols. I use it quite often. If you have problems with your image, you'll have to be more specific on how exactly this "doesn't seem to carry over". In case you mean the slices inside a web-layer that are used for export, the same thing, they work as ...



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