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14

Generically, it's called a "fleuron". Some specifically call it an "aldus leaf". A fleuron is essentially an ornamental typographic character. The Aldus Leaf being a commonly used one. More information: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fleuron_(typography)


10

Sorry about this, but I have just found the answer to my problem: Given this, I then created my own using Adobe Illustrator (seen in the following image). The outermost circle I used as one unit (in my case, 100 px diameter). Thanks anyway.


9

Method one - works with any shape. Create a no-fill, no-stroke rectangle and place a $ sign in the middle of it. $ sign must be on top of the rectangle. The amount of space between the $ sign and the rectangle edges will determine the spacing between the repeated $ signs. Drag all that to the Brush panel and choose Pattern Brush when asked. Then click OK ...


8

Sorry I came upon this question so late. You can have symbols instances with different colors to some extent. Use the Appearance panel to add a fill or stroke color to the selected symbol instance. Here I have added different fill colors to each instance of the same symbol.


8

How one can represent several grayish materials in 6 by 6 px using realistic colors? Well... you can't, at least if they're supposted to look different. Personally I'd stick to using just the three colors bronze, silver, gold which have a fairly well recognized order, known from sports-medals. As soon as you add more metals or elements you start to assume ...


8

In general, no, you don't want more than one 'aha' element in a logo. That's not to say you can't, or no one has, but it's a tough thing to pull off successfully. In this particular example, you actually have 3 things going on...the 'bike', the 'saddle' and the 'speech bubble'. And I do think they are all competing. None of them stand out in terms of scale ...


8

User experience is more important than precision. Take the phone icon for example. Phones haven't looked like this for a long time, but the icon is still very effective for communicating. The two concepts you are trying to communicate are shower and woman. Luckily, there are common icons for both so it's most communicative to just combine the icons. ...


8

Bathroom icons don't describe what you do in there, they describe who goes in. It's become a universal sign for restrooms as it's one of the few spots that's segregated by sex in most locations. But it can work equally as well for showers/changing rooms.


7

Asterism ⁂ (Unicode character U+2042 and HTML symbol ⁂ as well as Alt + 8258 on Windows) Used to 'indicate minor breaks in text,' call attention to a passage, or to separate sub-chapters in a book. Currency Symbol ¤ (Unicode character U+00A4 and HTML symbol ¤ or ¤ as well as Alt + 0164 on Windows) Used to denote a ...


7

After you insert a new symbol you can right click on the layer and "Detach from symbol" Now scaling it will only effect that one instance.


7

This is probably most likely considered a "rosette" and the style of the time period would be probably be called "Romanesque." As far as this particular design, I don't know if it is a class of design, but it was built up using some very basic geometrical manipulation. The cross is an obvious choice from a cultural perspective as well as a geometrical ...


7

Imitation of an older convention It's clear that the designers of more recent currency symbols have their own rational for including the slahses or 'strikouts' in the symbol. It's also clear that these elements naturally evolved in older currency symbols through the use of abbreviation and shorthand. It's more than likely that modern currency symbols are ...


6

Flourish, Filigree, or Ornament are common terms. Usage doesn't generally change the name. Simply because it's been used by the book designer to separate content, there's no special term I'm aware of for that specific type of usage.


6

Yes! It's called GREP styles, and you'll find it under paragraph styles. It allows you to enter a "regular expression" ( code-based super powerful advanced search), then, it applies a character style of your choice to anything that matches those criteria, instantly and automatically. If you edit text so a snippet no longer ...


6

The question asks about prime and double-prime symbols for minutes and seconds, which have been used for ages, and even feature in a piece of piano music (or what would be piano music, if there were a note played). However it then veers off from the question title to ask about extending this to using degree ° for hours. Don't. Prime/Double prime ...


6

The issue with silver, platinum and diamond is that they are all usually represented with similar colors. Color alone would not be enough, but shape can go a long(er) way. You mention you want your icons to be really small, if that's the case, only way to go is very simple shapes, like Stein mentions. I don't think it would be a good idea to have two ...


6

I like the II sign depicting pause on the players. Its advantage is that you can place a "stop" square or other signs of similar style, so the all bunch of signs will be successive.


6

In my opinion. Forget the option 1. It is for toddlers. I thought Junior as a son that have the same name as the father. Posible terms, kid, minor, child, under 15... For the icon, probably a head with a cap. I think that is representative of that range of age. (And maybe not pointing forward, but lateral or backwards) ...


6

These kinds of ornaments can also sometimes be called fleurons. A set of them is included in the Wingdings typeface with different transformations to allow for easy symmetrical decorations. ☙ ❧ There are some fleurons available in the Unicode specification under the Dingbats block (PDF). Fleurons 273E ✾ SIX PETALLED BLACK AND WHITE FLORETTE ...


6

Here's a link to a quick discussion on international symbology you might find interesting since you’ve already read about the ISO standard. A Brief History of International Symbols As the article and @johannes mentioned in the comments to your question, there is the American Institute of Graphic Arts (AIGA) 50 icon set designed in 1974 that has become a ...


6

The lines across currency symbols make them easier to identify clearly in handwritten documents. An error in the identification of even one alphanumeric character or symbol in a handwritten document can result in a very costly mistake or a lawsuit. Clear, unambiguous documents are also harder to forge. Having rational rules for currency symbols promotes ...


5

how about #1 and #2? Or from the noun project: this icon for drops labled #1 and this icon for poop labeled #2


5

No. You can't have multiple, differing, iterations of the same symbol. You can use the Symbol tools, like the Symbol Stainer, but that won't allow specific color assignments within any symbol. If you need different colored symbols, you need different symbols. You can easily swap symbols. Select a symbol on the artboard and then use the Control bar to swap ...


5

In Sketch Symbols and Shared Styles work across pages, but not cross-document. One way is to have a page (symbols page) with all the symbols you need and copy only the necessary for each project. A second approach (actually is the technique I've been using) is to have a template with two pages, one for all the symbols and another blank page in the ...


5

What about something like this ▧? I can't seem to make it larger so here's a pic Unicode number: U+2668 / HTML-code: ▧


5

I can expalin the the horizontal bars in INR (Indian Rupee) ₹ When Designer Udaya Kumar designed it he explains: The parallel lines at the top (with white space between them) are said to make an allusion to the tricolor Indian flag and also depict an equality sign that symbolizes the nation's desire to reduce economic disparity. (Wiki)


4

Make sure you've looked at the ticks and crosses available in Arial Unicode MS, Wingdings and Wingdings 2. Can be difficult to find in Character Map though, as they don't appear at consistent points in the Unicode table. These are not free fonts of course, but given you're producing an image sprite rather than embedding, this is not an issue.


4

Another approach to this particular situation is to use a relatively obscure (in my opinion, anyway) feature of the Transform Effect. It's under Effect > Distort and Transform > Transform and not under Object > Transform. The Transform effect doesn't create copies of your object, so it's light on memory. It is also a live effect, so if you change ...


4

Window > Symbols (Shift+Ctrl+F11) It's probably already open in a tab by your Swatches and Brushes Then you can just select your objects as a group and drag them right onto that window and it will prompt you to make them into a Symbol as a Graphic or Movie Clip.


4

I'm not sure of a general library, but this is the symbol for centre of gravity in engineering. You also see it used on crash test dummies and vehicles, where apparently it's a danger symbol.



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