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38

Any font has built-in spacing determined by the "side bearing" of each character. In metal type, the side bearing is the physical right or left edge of the individual piece of type that determines its spacing from the characters on either side. Digital fonts mimic this in the basic design process. "To kern" means to adjust the spacing between a pair of ...


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From the Wikipedia article on letter spacing: In typography, letter-spacing, also called tracking, refers to the amount of space between a group of letters to affect density in a line or block of text. Letter-spacing can be confused with kerning. Letter-spacing refers to the overall spacing of a word or block of text affecting its overall density ...


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Art is typically something that an artist designates as art, or society has deemed culturally important. It’s often a physical work (or just an idea) that had a certain aesthetic or intellectual intent. It’s purpose can vary, from being an outlet of personal expression, to excite the eyes, to set a mood/emotion, to provide commentary, etc. Design is ...


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A wireframe is about functionality. It can be a really simple sketch that demonstrates what sort of things you can do in your design. For example, a wireframe of a website will show the navigation, the main buttons, the columns, the placing of different elements. A mockup is a preview of what the website (in this case) will look like. It's a realistic ...


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I've been a designer for 8 years and I worked with many designers and artists. To summarize it quickly I would say: Artists are concerned about the design itself, they want to make something beautiful in their own way. Designers want to solve problems first, then to make it pretty according to the target and client.


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It is called Vignetting, which, as you described: […] is a reduction of an image's brightness or saturation at the periphery compared to the image center. It can appear as Mechanical (filters used in a shoot, improper lens hood, etc) Optical (lens) Natural (illumination falloff) Pixel (digital sensor's alignment to the scene) Photographic film (the ...


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They're almost interchangeable - but there's a difference of emphasis that can be useful. If you talk about the typeface, your focus is on the end result, some type's appearance and aesthetics in use. It might have come from a font, or it might not: hand-painted signs, graffiti art, comic lettering, calligraphy, logos etc can all have distinctive typefaces ...


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After some digging, I found it is called a catchword. Read more about it here: http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/65963/in-old-books-why-is-the-first-word-of-the-next-page-printed-at-the-bottom-of-th I always assumed this was to improve readability, as the reader could continue more seamlessly onto the following page, but it turns out it was also ...


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It's important to know that Minimalism is a thought process instead of an end look. If you design with the goal is make it more "minimalist," chances are you're doing it wrong. The thought process involves creating elements that are absolutely necessary without adding anymore value-less clutter. One of my favorite quotes: “Perfection is achieved, not ...


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Type Family - You didn't mention this but it's important. The design of all the characters comprised of a family and all its encompassing faces. Helvetica is a type family. Helvetica Condensed is a type family, Myriad Pro is a type family, etc. Typeface - the specific weight or instance of a particular family. I.E. Bold, italic, oblique are all typefaces. ...


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What is it A "visual library" would be a collection of photos, painting, graphics, patterns, artwork and colors that could be kept in your head, in print, or digitally. Working on it You can work on it by viewing and studying as many photos, graphics, patterns, artwork and colors as you are able. And I mean, really study them. Think about why someone ...


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So, my question is: Does the difference between a 'font' and a 'typeface' subside in the language? Or are font and typeface now used interchangeably even by pros? Well, the two are still different. The simplest possible way of describing the difference is thus: You use a font to generate letters in a given typeface. By "font" we usually now mean a ...


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I don't think your understanding is incorrect you're just seeing systems that try to help the user by pasting what it thinks they want. Since some ligatures ('fi', 'fl') are fairly common outside of typesetting systems, software recognizes that the user probably didn't enter that glyph, rather another app transformed their typed characters. In short: ...


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You should search Guilloché (Guilloche) if it's not digital smoke you looking for.


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It's called a Halftone From Wikipedia: Halftone is the reprographic technique that simulates continuous tone imagery through the use of dots, varying either in size, in shape or in spacing. "Halftone" can also be used to refer specifically to the image that is produced by this process. It is used to produce the appearance of continuous tone images in ...


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If you ask someone in the publishing world what they are called they will point you to what's called a "Chapter Ornament" or a "Book Ornament". If you want to get further technical on the design process, book designers will refer to them if they are at the beginning of a chapter as a "Chapter Heading Ornament" or at the end of the chapter as a "End of ...


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Wireframes are rudimentary shapes or lines used to designate position and/or size only. The goal of any wireframe is to "fit" the elements into a layout, not indicate how elements may actually appear in a final design, only where they will be located. Mockups are built on top of wireframes and go further to show overall appearance aspects of a design ...


7

Info-graphics , Informative Graphics and Visualizations: Are they the same term ? I'd say: Yes, "Info-graphics" is just a shorthand for "Informative Graphics", and No, "Visualizations" is a more general term than "info-graphics." I.e., a visualization does not need to be an info-graphic, whereas an info-graphics is a visualization.


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In the field of computing, 'icon' is certainly the most popular term for it. I believe it has been used in this field since the early 1980s when the first mouse-controlled graphical user interfaces emerged (Xerox, Apple) Outside the digital world, these simplified and standardized graphics have been called pictograms / pictographs since long before this ...


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I refer to them as artifacts. The term is general for lots of different types of distortion, but the kind of stray pixels you are talking about could be the result of a number of causes, so for a more specific term you'd need a more specific situation.


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The difference is really seen in line breaks, capabilities, and edit ability. Text wraps are self aware. They see the object being wrapped and adjust when that object changes. Increase the dimensions of a wrapped object and the text reflows to work around new dimensions. Most apps also provide a method to adjust the offset of wrapped text. So you can ...


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Landing Page Coming Soon Page Pre-launch / Pre Launch / Launching Soon Page


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I'd generally call this kind of graphics typographic artwork or, from the times when these advertising graphics and commercial signage were drawn by hand, lettering artwork. This is especially true for the second example (blue). The first one maybe not so much. See also: letter art. There is also a different genre of graphics called 'typographic art'.


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Just changing the size to make the width the same but the height different is simply called "typesetting". Making sure that multiple lines (read: a paragraph) fit left-aligned, right-aligned, center-aligned, or block-aligned is called "justification". But since some of your lines only contain a single word, the terms you are probably looking for here are ...


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I've not come across a standard term for these. They've been variously referred to as "splash," "screech" and "decal" in conversation with different designers over the years.


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Is there an accepted use of these terms in the context of typography for web? No. The only web-centric terms would be those dedicated to CSS styles which would include: font-family = either a specific or generic name for a computer font (digital file). Specific names would be something like Helvetica. Generic names would be something like monospace. ...


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It's called "halftone". http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halftone


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Depending on the context and who you're talking to, this is referred to as "keying" (also referred to as Chroma Key), "matting" (mostly video), "masking" (you'll come across "clipping mask" as a term which is interchangeable with "mask" in most cases) or extraction. These are all names for the same general technique, which is the basis of Compositing.



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