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11

There are many reasons why you would want to rasterize text. I agree that in general one does not want to do it if it can be avoided. Reasons for rasterization: You dont trust the end users application to do it correctly or you are having some issues with your own/a known rasterization engine. In these cases you can gain benefits. This can be a valid ...


8

Type that is not rasterised depends on a font file for its appearance. Usually, this font file is present on the system you make the type on. So far, no problem, and no need to rasterise the type. It only reduces editability, right? The fun starts when you want to send the file you're working in to another machine. You might want to do that to share your ...


7

To some extent its what others said, however, a big point was left out -- Smart Objects. Smart Objects were introduced in Adobe Photoshop CS2. Prior to this in order to use a number of Filters and techniques would require the type (and any vector really) be converted to Raster. This is for stuff like Glowing Edges, Texturizer, etc. Then Before version 7 ...


7

If possible you should always retain the vector information in your type, ideally by leaving your type as an editable text layer, converting it to a smart object or converting it to a shape layer. However, certain filters and tools in Photoshop (depending on which version of Photoshop you are using) can only be used on raster layers. From Photoshop Help / ...


6

The purpose of rasterizing text, effects, or anything for that matter, is to have a flat, non-editable, non-variable file format, and a fixed interaction with its background, whenever the output needs it. (1) In commercial printing, all work is at some point rasterized. If you send a vector file, for example your flyer for print, the RIP (Raster Image ...


5

When you outline text it creates a group, with each letter being its own shape. You can't use a group as a mask, what you need to do is create a compound path from your group. With your outlined text selected: Object → Compound Path → Make (or hit cmd + 8) But—You don't need to outline text to use it as a mask. Just use your live text as a mask and theres ...


3

The behavior you're seeing is because you're actually rotating a text frame...much like InDesign, as you said. You can rotate the object the way you want using the Rotate Tool (R) or the Free Transform Tool (E).


3

I believe the setting is "Type Object Selection by Path Only" under the Type tab in Preferences. If that box is checked it will behave the way you are describing.


2

Here's where the word "creative" comes in. Try a search for Novelty or Quirky typefaces. Maybe you can find a stock typeface that will please your client. There are tens of thousands of unmodified stock typefaces that are quite distinctive. Once you have some likely candidates, you can apply effects to them to modify them in a way to make them unique for ...


1

If your text is a text layer ('A' preview icon), then: Make a Path that follows the arc, Use Layer>Text along path (this menu is only available on text layers). This creates another path, which is your text following the arc path. Y Select>From path to create a selection from this Bucket-fill the selection. Slightly complex, but the result is much ...


1

Some thoughts. That is not necesarly a resolution issue, but how thin lines are processed. 1) An aliased image consist in some transition pixels to simulate smoothness If you have a thin line, lets say below of a pixel in size, you get just the aliased part: A gray line. In thin lines this diference is very notorious. One posible solution is making ...


1

It is in fact based on the font you're using, and how it's built, as @Alex mentioned above. Here's an example of four different fonts, same font size, exact same setting in each text box: The first font is standard Arial. The second it a fairly common sans-serif font, AG Book Pro. The third and fourth are fancier fonts I got from dafont.com. As you can ...


1

The answer to this question delves deeply into the theoretical aspects of graphic design. It has to do with how the human eye perceives the weight of something, and how that weight creates a hierarchy of importance within that context. Instead of getting caught up in all that, the answer is simple. Text should be emphasized (bold or italics) when it is the ...


1

There is a hacky way you can achieve this. Give your text a stroke Now, select your text box and click Object > Effects > Inner Glow Make sure your effect is applied to Object in the 'Settings for' drop-down menu Change the 'Blending mode' to Normal Select your stroke colour Set 'Opacity' to 100% Set 'Source' to Edge Adjust the 'Size' to the ...



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